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Forum: Getting There When You Can’t Drive – March 19th

UMA College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College present Getting There When You Can’t Drive at 2 pm on Sunday, Mar. 19
at Jewett Hall auditorium in Augusta.

Sponsored by UMA Senior College and the College of Arts and Sciences, the forum will present three speakers who will discuss the transportation situation in Maine for non-drivers. “Aging in Place” is an oft-stated desire of Maine senior citizens. A workable transportation system, particularly in rural areas, is a significant element in meeting this need. This program will address some steps, both working models and proposals, which could move Maine forward in keeping older people in their own homes

Jess Maurer will give an overview of Maine’s transportation problem and some solutions – diverse initiatives to serve various types of communities.

Bob MacDougall will focus on current transportation in Augusta and some ideas for the future that his Age Friendly Committee is considering.

Irene Goff will discuss “Neighbors Driving Neighbors”, a local initiative, how it started and the current status of the program.

Jess Mauer is the Executive Director of the Maine Association of Area Agencies on Aging. She advocates for the health and economic security of older adults at the national, state and local levels on behalf of Maine’s five Area Agencies on Aging.

Bob MacDougall is currently the Chair for the Augusta Age Friendly Committee, spearheading that initiative, and sits on the AARP Maine state volunteer advisory board. He is very involved in planning Augusta area transportation.

Irene Goff is the Coordinator for Neighbors Driving Neighbors (NDN) serving Belgrade, Fayette, Mount Vernon, Rome, Vienna. “I enjoy talking with people in my community connecting them with volunteer drivers so they can get to where they need to go.” Panel Moderator: Chuck Acker, Forum on the Future (FoF) Chair.

Chuck Acker, Chair of Forum on the Future Committee, will be moderator. The second part of the program will feature a question and answer session. UMASC forums are free and open to the public. Free refreshments are served during the break.

UMA Senior College is open to persons of fifty years or older, and their spouses and partners. Its’ all-volunteer faculty offers programs of courses on a wide variety of subjects for nominal membership and tuition fees. It provides monthly musical programs—Concerts at Jewett—for low admission prices. The Forum on the Future produces four forums a year on topics which are both timely and significant for Maine people. To learn more about UMASC or to request curriculum materials. please call 207-621-3551, email us at umasc@maine.edu or check out our web page at www.umasc.org..

Free Dental Cleanings and Exams available for kids on February 17​th at UMA Dental Health Clinic

UMA is hosting its annual “Give Kids A Smile Day” in partnership with the American Dental Association on Friday, February 1​7​th from 8:00am – 5:00pm at the UMA Dental Hygiene Clinic located on UMA’s Bangor campus at 201 Texas Avenue in Bangor.

Children ages 1-18 can schedule free dental appointments to get cleanings, exams, x-rays, fluoride, sealants and dental health education. Students from UMA’s Dental Hygiene and Dental Assisting programs will be handling the appointments with the aid of local volunteer dentists and faculty members from UMA’s Dental Health Programs.

For more information about the event contact the Dental Health Programs at 262-7872

In the wake of heightened awareness caused by the distribution of Klu Klux Klan (KKK) fliers in the central Maine area, the District Attorney for Kennebec and Somerset is hosting an open forum on discrimination at the University of Maine at Augusta’s Jewett Hall Auditorium on February 8th from 6:00pm – 9:00pm; a snow date is set for the same time and place on February 16, 2017.

Portland Press Herald article about the event »

The event is an opportunity for residents of Augusta, Gardiner, and surrounding communities to join a town hall forum discussion about the KKK fliers and discrimination in the community led by Maeghan Maloney, District Attorney for Kennebec and Somerset counties.

Event speakers include Maine Attorney General, Janet Mills who will talk about what constitutes a hate crime, and UMA Social Science Professors James Cook and Lorien Lake-Corral who will present on the distinction between prejudice and discrimination and research on racial discrimination in the United States; including a historic incident in Bath and Bangor in the 1800s. In addition Fatuma Hussein, the founder and executive director of the Immigrant Resource Center of Maine; and Ahmed Al-Abbas, owner of Mainely Groceries in Augusta and Hallowell will also be speaking at the event.

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the District Attorney’s office at (207) 623-1156.

The Plaid Dragonflies: Singing Through the Genres at UMA Jewett Auditorium, Sunday, February 12, 2017, 2PM

Val Bennett

Val Bennett

The “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College will feature the Plaid Dragonflies: Singing Through the Genres on Sunday, February 12, 2017, 2PM at Jewett Hall Auditorium.  (Snow date: February 19th).

The duo of Val Bennett and Tess Zardus, The Plaid Dragonflies, will play and sing tunes from a variety of genres as they weave their magical harmonies into the music of the Beatles, Johnny Cash, Bette Midler, Bonnie Raitt and others, as well as their own songs.  They’ll explain their inspirations for music and writing and will encourage you to sing along if you wish.  Val and Tess come to Concerts at Jewett at the request of UMA Senior College students who heard them perform in the classroom and wanted to hear more.  You’ll also hear their special guest, Dave Thibodeau on the bass guitar.

Tess Zardoff

Tess Zardoff

Val Bennett has been performing solo and with bands for years throughout Maine.  She began playing guitar at age 10 and soon found that she enjoyed songwriting. Val is a soloist and bandleader of The Over EZ Band, an all girl band.  She co-wrote and co-produced a CD, the Plaid Dragonflies, with Tess Zardus.

Tess Zardus started with the violin at age 8, wrote poetry and lyrics early on, and studied clarinet, trumpet, baritone, keyboard and vocals.  She came to Maine in 2004, joined Val’s Over EZ Band, and learned to play the bass from Dave Thibodeau.

Dave Thibodeau, tutored by his touring bluegrass musician father and concert violinist grandfather, began playing guitar at the age of 10.  After moving to Maine, Dave studied bass at UMA and has played in diverse ensembles around New England.

T

Dave Thibodeau

Dave Thibodeau

ickets are $10, students $5, 12 & under free.  Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop  and at the door.  Call 621-3551, or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or for mail order tickets.

Website: www.concertsatjewett.com

The next concert is Sunday, March 5, 2017, 2PM – Choro Louco, a Brazilian Choro band from Portland

The UMA College of Arts and Sciences and the UMA Senior College (UMASC) will be presenting their next forum on the future at 2:00 pm on Sunday, March 19, 2017 at Jewett Auditorium.

We hear a lot these days about the loss of former employers and jobs in our state and in our country…a major concern.   While many look at this as a decline in our prospects, others are proposing and implementing a new prosperity as does one of our speakers, Alan Caron, author of Maine’s Next Economy:  How the State’s Innovators, Entrepreneurs and Doers are Growing a New Prosperity.

A weekly columnist for the Maine Sunday Telegram and the Central Maine newspapers, he will address the transition of Maine’s natural resource economy towards a more innovative and entrepreneurial future.  He has worked on a wide-ranging variety of issues such as protecting jobs we have, and helping grow new ones.  He others include improving education and transportation, expanding renewable energy and high speed internet statewide.  A lifelong resident of Maine, he holds a Master’s Degree in Public Policy and Management from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

Our second speaker is also a Maine native and graduate of the University of Maine who has been an active member of the outdoor sports scene all of his life.  Author of Maine Sporting Camps, and A Life Lived Outdoors, he has been active in community and state affairs, and several outdoor related campaigns and referendums.  Executive Director of the Sportsman’s Alliance of Maine for 18 years, he now writes full-time:  an award winning outdoor news blog on his website and that of the Bangor Daily News, and a weekly column for the Central Maine newspapers.   He and his wife travel throughout Maine inns and restaurants and discuss their adventures in  The Traveling Mainers, a column also for the Central Maine Newspapers.  He will discuss the decline of Maine woods for hunting and fishing, and how sporting camps are meeting the challenge in a variety of new services for recreation and vacationing.

The program will be moderated by Marilyn Canavan, UMASC, and a former Maine legislator.  All forums are free and open to the public.

UMASC is open to all aged 50 or older, their spouses and partners.  To learn more about this program or other activities, call 621-3551, e.mail us at umasc@maine.edu,  or check out our web page at www.umasc.org.

Brendan Gilpatrick joined the Moose family in November of 2016 as the Staff Associate for Fitness and Athletics & Head Men’s and Women’s Cross Country Coach.  He quickly became an asset to the program and his enthusiasm for the position has been a benefit to the students and staff around him.

An interesting fact about Gilpatrick is that he races Mountain Ultra Trail (in distances of up to and beyond 100 miles) and has been doing so for over 10 years now. This weekend, Brendan will head to Hawaii to take part in a 100 mile race through the Hawaiian jungle with 25,000 feet of climbing over the course of the race.  For this race, there is roughly a 40% finish rate as the course is technical and littered with roots making the 36 hour finish requirement of the race seem even more daunting.

Gilpatrick has a history with the “HURT 100”. In 2010 he finished the 100-kilometer race in 6th place. In 2013 he returned to race the full 100-miler and imploded 60 miles into the race. Most recently, in 2015, he finally finished the 100-miler with a top 10 finish in just over 26 hours.  On Saturday morning at 6AM he will be standing on the start line surrounded by others who have taken a chance and decided to follow a dream.

Training 10 to 15 hours a week on top of a full-time job as well as running a coaching business has been difficult, but he has found that the greatest personal development comes from going after something big and scary.

He has learned more about himself by waking up at 4 in the morning to drive to the mountains to run for 4 hours in subzero temperatures than he ever has finishing any race, and that is something he has tried to help his athletes discover. “One of the most important things a coach can do is to help an athlete take the skills and passion they have for their sport and channel it into every aspect of their life,” notes Coach Gilpatrick.

Ohana is the Hawaiian word for family and it is one of the most important facets of Hawaiian culture. “Family” is also the word on the back of the UMA men’s and women’s warmups where you would typically see someone’s last name.  Gilpatrick noted: “starting a new job can be stressful but the community here at UMA has truly embraced and encouraged me to pursue my personal goals however grand and unusual they may be.”

Gilpatrick’s Moose family will certainly be cheering him on through this incredible journey.  To follow live standings, please visit: https://ultrasignup.com/live/live.htm?dtid=21653.

 

HybridExhibtion

“HYBRID” an exhibit of sculpture, printmaking, video technology, photography, graphic design, film and new media opens Monday, December 19th in UMA’s Danforth Gallery.

“HYBRID” is an eclectic mix of works by seven artists from the MFA Intermedia Program at the University of Maine Orono utilizing installation, print, video technology, graphic design, printmaking and unconventional collected materials.

Artists SueAnn Gaitligs, Tara Law, Matt LeClair, Stanley Levitsky, Adam Paul, Virginia Valdes, and Wade Warman explore concepts such as: human conditions of emotions and anxieties, environmental issues and their relationship to technology, commerce and creativity, self-identification, notions of “self-help,” and finding humor in our shared human conditions.

The exhibit runs from December 19th to February 2, 2017. A reception will be held at noon on February 2nd with an artist talk at 1:00pm in UMA’s Danforth Gallery located in Jewett Hall.

3 minute video about exhibition: https://vimeo.com/195698478
For more information: www.artsuma.com
To learn more about the MFA program visit: http://intermediamfa.org

The Veterinary Technology program at the University of Maine at Augusta will be hosting an Open House on Saturday, December 3rd from 12:00 – 3:00pm. The event is intended for prospective students interested in applying to UMA’s Bachelor’s in Veterinary Technology program.

Featuring labs setup along with students who can talk first-hand about their experiences within the program, attendees will also have the opportunity to meet Vet Tech faculty members and talk with admissions representatives about the process for applying.

The open house will take place at the clinical laboratory which is located on UMA’s Bangor campus on the first floor of Camden Hall. There is no need to register ahead of time.

For more information about UMA’s Bachelor in Veterinary Technology visit: http://www.uma.edu/academics/programs/veterinary-technology/ or contact Program Coordinator, Roger Barkman at (207) 262-7855.

Flyer for Visiting Artist from ChinaThe University of Maine at Augusta will be welcoming Min Yao from Nanjing, China on its Augusta campus this month to meet with students and faculty. She will hold a public presentation on Monday, December 5th at noon in the drawing studio in the Art Building located behind Jewett Hall.

A native of Nanjing, one of the four ancient cities in China, Min Yao is a young, energetic graphic designer and film maker from Nanjing, China.

In her own words, “my art explores the expression of traditional Chinese characters in modern times,” she explained. “At the same time, as a native of Nanjing, I am interested in viewing an historical retrospection of family history that is defined by the political turmoil, occupation and ancient Chinese traditions that has impacted generations of families in our city,” she added.

In addition to her numerous exhibitions in China, Min Yao is also the recipient of several awards in art, technology and innovation.

She has a Bachelor Degree from Changzhou Institute of Technology and is currently completing her graduate studies in graphic design at the prestigious Nanjing University of the Arts where she focuses on traditional Chinese design as well as the study of “western design thinking.”

UMA will held an awards ceremony for local high school students enrolled at UMA through the Bridge Year Program on Saturday the 3rd at Spectacular Events in Bangor.

WABI TV 5 News Coverage of the event »

A demonstration of UMA’s commitment to Bridge Year students as they pursue college credit, UMA President James Conneely will handed out awards to participating local high school students who have earned a GPA of 2.75 or higher.

The Bridge Year Program is a state-wide concurrent enrollment program that combines college level academics with career and technical education for Maine high school juniors and seniors. Bridge Year courses earn both high school credit towards graduation, and college credit toward a future college career.

In its third year participating in the Bridge Year Program, UMA is the largest stakeholder providing courses to roughly 260 juniors and seniors from 16 local high schools throughout Maine. Other participants include Eastern Maine Community College, University of Maine at Fort Kent, University of Southern Maine and University of Maine.

In addition to the Bridge Year Program, UMA also participates in the tuition waiver program, also known as Dual Enrollment or Aspirations. Like Bridge Year, this program provides early college options for Maine high school juniors and seniors. UMA’s Dual Enrollment program initially required on-campus classroom attendance, but has recently made more online options available which broadens the program to high school students throughout the state who may live further away from UMA’s campuses.

2016 fall jazz week posterThe University of Maine at Augusta presents the fall 2016 UMA Jazz (and more) Week on Tuesday, November 29, Friday, December 2, and Saturday, December 3, 2016.

The semester culmination of UMA’s Jazz program students, the concerts are free and will be held at UMA’s Jewett Hall Auditorium at 7:00pm each night. No tickets or reservations are required.

The full calendar of Jazz (and more) Week events includes the following ensemble performances:

  • Tuesday, November 29, 7:00 pm: Senior Recital – Joe Murphy, Composition
  • Friday, December 2, 7:00 pm: Progressive Rock Ensemble – Scott Hughes, Dir. and Contemporary Sounds – Pamela Jenkins, Dir.
    Live Stream Link »
  • Saturday, December 3, 7:00 pm: Envok (Jazz vocal ensemble) – Marcia Gallagher, Dir. and Jazz On Tour – Duane Edwards, Dir.
    Live Stream Link »

For further information, please call (207) 621-3286.

Priority Consideration for Spring Semester Adult Degree Completion Scholarships Ends December 1st

While it is never too late for Mainers to resume their college educations, the priority consideration for the University of Maine System’s Spring Semester Adult Degree Completion Scholarship ends December 1st.

Maine has approximately 200,000 stranded adult learners who have invested time and money into a college education without earning their degree.  With funding support from the Maine Legislature the University of Maine System established the Adult Degree Completion Scholarship Program in 2014 to provide up to $4,000 annually to help adults with demonstrated financial need resume their course work and earn a career-advancing college degree.

Applications are accepted throughout the year but the deadline for priority consideration for scholarships for the Spring of 2017 is December 1, 2016.   Any Maine resident who has earned at least 30 college credits toward a first baccalaureate degree who has been away from class for at least three years could be eligible for financial support to resume course work through any of Maine’s public universities.

Visit Learn.Maine.Edu and click on “scholarships” for application materials and additional eligibility information or call 1-800-868-7000 to get started.

Aid is awarded based on financial need and course load.  In just two years Maine’s Adult Degree Completion Scholarships have helped 304 adult learners get back on track toward a degree, funding 795 semesters of college completion work with an average award of $1,295 per semester.

Adult Degree Completion Scholarships have been awarded to adult learners from 132 different Maine communities proving that proximity to a college campus is no longer a barrier to earning a college degree.   Maine’s community-based University Centers, improvements in connectivity, and the development of distance programing gives every Maine resident access to public higher education regardless of age, location, or background.

Specially trained education navigators at Maine’s public universities are also available to answer questions and help busy adults with applications, choosing classes, financial aid, and getting the resources they need to balance class work with adult responsibilities.

“Far too many Mainers have invested time and money into an education but had to stop short of their goal of graduating with a college degree,” said James H. Page, Chancellor of the University of Maine System. “With the dependency between educational attainment and economic opportunity growing stronger every year, Maine’s universities are committed to providing the access, support, and resources adult Maine learners need to realize their goals.”

2017 National Veterans BadgesThe University of Maine at Augusta has once again been recognized with three different national awards for its commitment to educating and providing opportunities to America’s veterans, service members and their families.

Designated a 2017 Military Friendly School for the 7th year in a row, named a 2017 Military Times Best for Vets Colleges for the 5th year in a row, and a 2017 Military Advanced Education & Transition Top School for the 3rd year in a row, the awards highlight UMA’s continued rich tradition of supporting military-experienced students.

In addition to its most recent national awards, UMA was also named a 2016 Best Online Bachelor’s Programs for Veterans by U.S. News & World Report earlier this year.

The rankings for each of the awards are based on factors such as military support services, both online and on campus, graduation and employment outcomes, success rates, military culture, financial aid, and flexibility for veterans, service members, and their families.

Among the support UMA offers is a peer mentor program for veterans, veteran’s lounges, as well as admissions and advising staff, many of whom are veterans themselves, trained to help veteran and service members to translate specialized military credit and/or other previously earned credits into a college major.

The University of Maine at Augusta has campuses in Augusta and Bangor, and eight University College Centers in communities across Maine.

For more information about UMA’s Veterans Program visit: uma.edu/veterans.

Registration Now Open

UMA Students discussing coursework on the Campus Green

  • Registration is open through January 19th. 
  • Classes begin on January 17th. 
  • For help with your wish list in MaineStreet contact the Advising Center at 207-621-3149.

Ways to Register:

Need more information?

Registration »

Programs & Degrees  »

Open Houses & Admission Events »

Each semester University of Maine System (UMS) students must complete the Student Financial Responsibility Statement as a condition of enrollment. This statement is designed to ensure your awareness and understanding of billing policies and your financial obligations as a UMS student. Please check your MaineStreet To-Do List to view and acknowledge the statement. Please contact UMA Student Financial Services at 207-621-3412 if you need assistance.

 


 

jessepottslarge-2

Jesse Potts
Artist reception, Wed. Nov.16 noon
with lecture at 1pm

 


“The Flood,” a new collection of sculpture, photography, and installation by artist Jesse Potts is currently on display at UMA’s Danforth Gallery through December 9th.
These works emerged from Potts meditation on the purpose and meaning of “home” and exploration of ways that meaning can shift based on one’s perception of whether “home” is permanent or temporary. Filled with metaphors and a mash-up of symbols this exhibition suggests both stability and movement.

VIDEO OF INSTALLATION

For more information: www.artsuma.com

Augusta, Maine – The University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) will host a climate change event on November 10, 2016 at 12:00 in the Fireplace Lounge, Randall Student Center, 46 University, Drive, Augusta.

Hosted by the UMA English program, the guest presenter will be Elizabeth Rush Meuller, Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at Bates College Her work chronicles Maine residents whose lives have been impacted by climate change. The archive of the event is available at www.bates.edu/climatechange.

The event is free and open to the general public. For more information contact Ellen Taylor at ellen.taylor@maine.edu

Augusta, Maine – The University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) will host a week of events honoring Veterans. Named a military friendly school by G.I. Jobs Magazine for the past five years, UMA has also been named recognized by US News & World Report for offering one of the best online Bachelor’s degree programs for Veterans.

Events will be held on both UMA’s Augusta campus, 46 University Drive, Augusta; and Bangor campus, 1 University Drive, Bangor.

The week of events begins on Sunday, November 6. All events are open to the general public.

Sunday, November 6, 2016, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm UMA Augusta Kick-off

  • UMA Veteran’s Affairs: Table in Jewett Hall, Augusta Campus
  • Senior College: Concert at Jewett Series, Don Campbell: Honoring Veterans
  • Welcome by UMA President James Conneely
  • Kennebec Honor Guard 

Monday November 7, 2016, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm Bangor Kick-off

  • UMA Veteran’s Affairs: Table in Eastport Hall, Bangor Campus
  • Thank you cards & Recognition Cake
  • Welcome by Assistant Provost for Community Outreach & Economic Development Pamela Proulx-Curry

Tuesday November 8, 2016

  • UMA Veteran’s Affairs: Table in Randall Student Center Foyer
  • Writing Center: Thank you cards 

Wednesday November 9, 2016, 11:45 am – 1:00 pm Fireside Lounge

  • UMA Veteran’s Affairs: Table in Randall Student Center Foyer
  • Writing Center: Thank you cards
  • 12:00 Open Mic: Veteran Stories, Special Guest: Gary Crocker
  • Welcome by Aviation Program Coordinator, Gregory Jolda

Thursday November 10, 2016, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

  • UMA Veteran’s Affairs: Table in Randall Student Center Foyer
  • Writing Center: Thank you cards
  • Cake and Ice cream Social
  • 12:30 Flag Folding Ceremony
  • Received by UMA’s nursing education program 

Friday November 11, 2016

  • UMA Day of Observance

Sunday November 13, 2016, 1:00 pm – 3:30 pm Hannaford Hall, Brunswick Landing

University College Bath/Brunswick

  • Searching for Home: Coming Back from War documentary screening
  • Welcome by Vice President for Student Engagement & Enrollment Management Claire Good

Maine Attorney General Janet MillsNovember, 2016 | Augusta, Maine – Maine’s Attorney General Janet Mills will be the featured speaker at an aging forum on November 15 at the University of Maine at Augusta (UMA). The forum will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Fireplace Lounge of the Randall Student Center on UMA’s Augusta campus, 46 University Drive. The event is free and open to the general public, and will be broadcast LIVE to UMA’s Bangor Campus in 136 Eastport Hall. Weblinks to the event are available. You can find more information about Weblinks, and RSVP, here.

The forum is hosted in collaboration with UMA Senior College and the UMA Aging Initiative and is consistent with the University of Maine System’s initiative to enhance research and awareness of aging successfully in Maine. Begun in 2015 through institutional support from a Presidential Mini-Grant to enhance student retention, the lunch and learn forums bring together students, faculty, and community members to address topics related to aging in a discussion format.

Don CampbellThe “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College will present Don Campbell: A Veterans Appreciation Concert on Sunday, November 6, 2016, 2PM at UMA Jewett Auditorium.

Maine native singer-songwriter Don Campbell’s music is inspired by sources as diverse as the Celtic and Canadian Maritimes music of his family to Dan Fogelberg, Vince Gill, the Beatles and novelist Stephen King, and he writes in many musical genres. This concert will include some of his original songs and is billed as “a Family-Friendly and Non-Political Concert to Celebrate our Heroes.” Don Campbell says “Since 1994 I’ve decided to try to bring more of an awareness to our Veterans and the sacrifices of their families…I believe that people who live in the sunlight of Freedom should gratefully remember who and how it was earned for them.”

Jewett Hall’s auditorium has limited space available for wheelchair placement. It is recommended that individuals who may require such a space contact UMA Senior College, 621-3551, to reserve one. Wheelchair spaces will be assigned in the order in which reservations are received.

Veterans admitted free. Tickets are $10 for all other adults, students $5, 12 & under free. Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop and at the door. Call 621-3551, or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or for mail order tickets.

Website: www.concertsatjewett.com

The next concert is Sunday, December 18, 2016, 2PM at South Parish Congregational Church in Augusta – A Christmas Concert with the Downeast Brass and Jay Zoller, organist.

Media contact:
Irene Forster
445-5227
iforster@fairpoint.net

Augusta, Maine – The University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) will host a debate between the candidates for Kennebec County Sheriff.

The debate between Ryan Reardon (D) and Ken Mason (I), will take place October 24 from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. in Jewett Hall Auditorium on the UMA campus, 46 University Drive, Augusta. Sharon McMahon Sawyer, an Assistant Professor of Justice Studies at UMA, will serve as moderator. The event is free and open to the general public.

For more information call: 207.621.3185

UMA Professors flying UAVs on Campus GreenAugusta, Maine – Is Maine poised to become the training hub for an ever expanding $82 billion industry with business, first responder, and military applications?

It will when plans unfolding at the University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) take shape. The first step is already in place.

President James F. Conneely and officials in the Aviation program have announced that in October, UMA will be the first institution of higher learning in Maine to offer an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) or “drone” course. Scheduled to begin on October 27 at the Augusta campus, the 7 week intensive UAV course will offer a path for individuals to seek an FAA remote pilot’s license. Registration information is available online at www.uma.edu or call 1-877-UMA-1234.

The non-credit course will serve both licensed pilots and non-pilots alike, with enrollment open to the general public. Planning is underway for the UMA Aviation program to offer a comprehensive series of UAV courses, preparing graduates to successfully sit for the FAA exams required to work as a professional UAV pilot. Starting salaries for pilots holding commercial FAA licenses and this remote pilot certificate can exceed $100K-a-year.

“There is a strong job market for licensed UAV pilots,” noted Conneely, a pilot himself. “Serving the need to train UAV pilots will most certainly lead to economic growth for the state of Maine, attracting business investment or sparking development.”

“Applications for UAV’s are varied and growing,” noted Tom Abbott, Project Manager for the Small UAV Pilot Training Center at UMA. These include business applications such as using UAV’s to conduct engineering inspections; monitoring power transmission lines and pipelines; examining crop health in the forests of Maine using infrared technology; and Search and Rescue applications, among many other uses.

Conneely and Abbott believe that UMA is uniquely well-positioned to expand its Aviation program to incorporate UAV training as a fourth-year option in the Bachelor’s in Aviation degree program.

Civil Air Patrol Colonel Dan Leclair, an Instructor in the program and Northeast Regional Commander for the Civil Air Patrol, has been involved with national level UAV training programs for the past 3-years and is an integral part of this new program. UMA officials are optimistic that with the right kinds of support, possibly including public and private partnerships, that UMA could become a UAV training hub serving a national market.

“Maine is projected to achieve 5% of the national UAV market,” Abbott said. “We think that we can do significantly better than that.”

Augusta, Maine – The Charles Danforth Gallery at the University of Maine at August (UMA) will host a panel discussion as part of the current exhibition, [stillness] by Susan Bickford currently on view until October 27.

On Thursday, October 20 a panel discussion entitled “Leaving a Trace: Art + Climate Change,” will be held in the Danforth Gallery on the UMA Augusta campus, 46 University Drive from 12 Noon to 1 p.m.

The four panelists include: David Fields: Senior Research Scientist Zooplankton Ecologist Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences; Jan Piribeck: Professor of Digital Art and Foundations University of Southern Maine; Julie Poitras Santos:  Artist + Assistant Professor, MFA in Studio Art, Maine College of Art; and Anna Witholt Abaldo: Co-Director, Joseph A. Fiore Art Center, Gallery Curator Maine Farmland Trust.

The diverse panelists will describe the work that they do as related to Art + Climate Change, and give an example of how it is able to shift the public consciousness toward conservation or not. They also will respond to questions such as:  What do we need to make visible to slow down/arrest climate change? How do we work together scaling our efforts to effect a larger shift? Is there any proof? How do we overcome powerlessness? What are the questions we need to be posing right now?

The currently Danforth exhibition, [stillness] Susan Bickford – is a work of performance art centered around the reversing falls in Sheepscot Village. It was shot from five cameras which have been synched, and exist in this show as a video installation. Organizer Susan Bickford invited 10 artists to retreat for 3 days to experience the stillness at the falls, drop into it and respond. The result is a deep ecological approach to art making, interdisciplinary, collaborative, and improvisational.

For more information visit ArtsUMA.com. Follow on Facebook: Danforth Gallery at UMA.

Climate Change: How Will Maine Cope?

Forum on the Future LogoAugusta, Maine – What steps can be taken to slow the advance of climate change? This and other questions about climate change will be addressed during a University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) forum.

Sponsored by the UMA College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College and moderated by Chuck Acker, the forum will take place on Sunday, October 30 at 2 p.m. in Jewett Hall on the UMA Augusta campus, 46 University Drive, Augusta. The forum is free and open to the general public.

Dr. James F. Conneely, President of UMA, will welcome the audience. Climate change is the theme for the 2016 – 2017 academic year at his institution. The year will be marked by significant opportunities for the exploration and discussion of the causes and effects of climate change, in addition to how individuals and collective efforts can make a difference in its mitigation.
Featured participants include Ivan Fernandez, Ph.D., a soil scientist and affiliate of the Institute on Climate Change at the University of Maine. Co-author of a report entitled Maine’s Climate Future, he will discuss planet warming, mitigation and adaptation.

Andrew E. Smith, State Toxicologist for Maine’s Center for Disease Control (CDC), will discuss dealing with health threats resulting from climate change. These threats include excessive heat and disease-bearing ticks.

The presenters will explore the challenges associated with climate warming and its potential to impact both Maine’s economy and the health of Mainers.

UMA Senior College is open to persons fifty years or older and their spouses. An all-volunteer faculty offers courses on a wide variety of subjects for nominal membership and tuition fees. Senior College hosts monthly musical programs entitled Concerts at Jewett for moderate admission prices. Forum on the Future produces four programs a year on topics which are both timely and significant for Mainers. A forum on Elections 2016 was recently presented. Next year Senior College will host forums on Maine’s economy and transportation for elderly people.

Project>LoginCollaborative Consulting Augusta, Maine – Businesses and others in need of Information Technology (IT) help will soon participate in an annual event at the University of Maine at Augusta (UMA).
The Project Login Networking Event will take place on Thursday, September 29 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the Fireside Lounge, Robinson Hall on the campus of UMA, 46 University Drive, Augusta.

The Project>Login campus networking receptions bring together college students, college faculty, and employers. Students are able to hear about internships and job prospects in Maine from a variety of employers. Employers are able to share information about their companies and interact with students who might be a great fit for internships or job opportunities. These events are a great opportunity for students to engage with employers and learn how their work in the classroom directly connects to the workplace.

Project>Login, a program of Educate Maine, is a campaign to increase Maine’s computing and information technology professionals through education, information, and internships. Project>Login collaborates with Maine’s businesses, universities, and K-12 schools to educate, engage, and employ more people in the fields of computing and information technology.

Campus networking receptions attended by current employers and professionals in the field provide students with the perfect venue for learning about current trends in the field of CS/IT and what skills are needed to land the perfect internship or dream job. Networking with businesses that are looking for employees with specific skills is an ideal way to ensure success after graduation, note organizers of the event.

Businesses that will attend include Tyler Technologies, State of Maine Office of Information Technology, Collaborative Consulting, aizoOn, and AthenaHealth, among others.

Businesses that are interested in meeting Computer Information Systems (CIS) students for possible internship or job opportunities may contact Jason at jason@educatemaine.org.

This Thursday, September 22, the Portland Press Herald will be sending a photographer to photograph a group of UMA faculty and staff who are attempting the zero-waste challenge. Please consider joining us if you are available — it’d be great to congregate a large group. We’re meeting in the RSC Fireside Lounge at 10:30 and the whole shebang should take no more than 20 minutes or so. Questions? Please contact Lisa Botshon (botshon@maine.edu).

Missed our first column? Check it out here: UMA’s Zero-Waste Challenge

Subsequent columns will be written by other members of the UMA community.

 

UMA 2016 ConvocationI would like to welcome you to the 2016-2017 academic year. A special welcome also to our Rising Scholars, each of whom has been nominated for recognition by a member of the faculty or staff.

During this program Colin Woodward, State and National Affairs Writer for the Portland Press Herald and the Maine Sunday Telegram, will deliver our keynote address.

Convocation is a time of optimism, possibilities, and new beginnings. We gather together today to recognize and celebrate the strengths of our community and connections that we share with one another.

We take stock of our plans, hopes and aspirations while focusing on what it means to be a contributing member of the greater UMA community.

Businesswoman Nita Ambani has observed that: “Education is not a tool for development… It is the foundation for our future. It is empowerment to make choices and emboldens the youth to chase their dreams.”

In the context of higher education, the most common currency is that of dreams. But what does that mean? It means the world of possibilities and choices that are before each student at UMA. It is a pathway for personal growth the likes of which humankind has never improved upon, because all that has improved humankind has been achieved through knowledge – universities serving as formalized structures to nurture intellectual development and personal growth.

Community relates to our shared sense of purpose, ensuring the success of our collective quest for excellence. I think it is fair to say that we ask the best of ourselves each day, whether it is seeking knowledge or imparting it.

Rising Scholars congratulated during Convocation processionalThe support systems that we have in place to nurture each student is a trait of our community. Our interconnectedness and shared sense of purpose shapes who we are and defines how we serve.

I submit that community is perhaps the one common trait that best defines the essence of UMA, for it is a vessel into which we pour the essence of who we are as individuals. Our community draws its collective strength from the individual efforts of every student, faculty and staff member.

The academic theme for this year is climate change, which is certainly a timely and worthy subject to coalesce our diverse talents around as a focus, or rallying point, for scholarship and imaginative exploration and expression.

There are several definitions of the word climate. One definition of climate is: the composite or generally prevailing weather conditions of a region, as temperature, air pressure, humidity, precipitation, sunshine, cloudiness, and winds, throughout the year, averaged over a series of years.

Rising Scholars congratulated during Convocation processionalBut there is a second definition of climate that I would like to mention and consider, which is: the prevailing attitudes, standards, or environmental conditions of a group, period, or place.

Extending the theme of climate beyond larger regional and global scientific concerns, I would offer a bit of a twist on this subject and mention that as just defined climate also means how we interact with one another, support each other, and express our talents for the good of each other and this institution.

UMA has its own distinctive institutional climate that relates to its mission of access and quest to help each student to reach his or her best potential. The crossroads of our programs and purpose is a place of engagement, possibility and promise. As such, for members of this community, all roads lead both to and from UMA.

Rising Scholars congratulated during Convocation processionalWhether we serve as professionals or pursue studies on this campus, the Bangor campus, or at one of our eight University College centers in communities across Maine, we are all devoted to nurturing a positive, welcoming climate of empowerment.

The ideal campus climate at UMA is one that sees personal discovery as a natural outcome of rigorous scholarship. Our community therefore engenders an ideal climate of opportunity and growth when our high standards nourish the needs and aspirations of our students, who as graduates, will provide the leadership necessary to ensure the sustainability of this planet.

I wish you every success in the coming year and would like to leave you with a quote from philosopher Soren Kierkegaard, who said: “Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced.”

 

Fiddle-icious in concertAugusta, Maine – Fiddle-icious will offer a performance on Sunday, October 16 at 2 p.m. in Viles Auditorium at Cony High School, 60 Pierce Drive in Augusta.

The performance is part of the “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by the University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts (UMA) and Sciences and UMA Senior College.

Fiddle-icious is composed of a diverse group of enthusiastic fiddlers and other musicians of all ages and walks of life with members from Kittery to Augusta. Their music comes from the Irish, Scottish, Quebecois and Acadian traditions and includes reels, jigs, marches, hornpipes, waltzes, step-dancing and singing.

Fiddle-icious is directed by Don Roy, a designated Master Fiddler from Gorham, considered a “living cultural treasure” here in Maine. Both Don and his wife Cindy are committed to keeping Maine’s musical heritage alive with this non-profit, all volunteer community organization.

Tickets are $10, students $5, 12 & under free. Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop and at the door. Call 621-3551 or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or for mail order tickets.

The next concert in the series is Sunday, November 6, 2016, 2PM – Don Campbell Honors American Veterans. Veterans admitted free.

Augusta, Maine – They come from communities across Maine, each with a success story pointing to Maine’s bright future.

On Friday, September 16, distinguished faculty, staff, students from the University of Maine at Augusta (UMA), the UMA Bangor campus and eight University College Centers in communities across Maine, will gather on the Augusta campus to celebrate Convocation 2016. The event will be held on UMA campus green from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. UMA is located at 46 University Drive, Augusta.

Colin Woodard, 2016 Convocation Keynote Speaker

Colin Woodard, 2016 Convocation Keynote Speaker

Colin Woodard, a New York Times bestselling author and award-winning journalist, will serve as Keynote Speaker. Other speakers scheduled include Dr. James Conneely, President of UMA, Dr. Peter Milligan, Professor of Biology, and Ellen Stoops, a Biology major. ‘

Milligan and Stoops will provide perspectives on climate change, the theme for the 2016 – 2017 academic year. The year will be marked by significant opportunities for the exploration and discussion of the causes and effects of climate change, in addition to how individuals and collective efforts can make a difference in its mitigation.

“Convocation is a time to recognize UMA students who have shown exceptional academic promise,” noted Dr. James Coneely, President of UMA. “We also recognize meritorious achievement and distinguished scholarship.”
A unique aspect of the UMA’s Convocation is recognition of Rising Scholars, students who have been nominated by faculty and staff for demonstrated academic achievement or promise. The initiative was established in 2011 and many Rising Scholars from prior years attend. Rising Scholars participate with faculty in a formal Professional.

This year professionals from UMA Aviation, Maine’s only four-year Bachelor’s degree program in aviation, will use an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), commonly known as “drones,” to document Convocation from unique aerial views. The fast growing UAV segment of the aviation industry is projected to become a multi-billion dollar industry within years, with the potential to spark statewide economic development in Maine. A fourth-year UAV track is planned at UMA, offering BS in Aviation graduates entry into one of the most lucrative and in-demand fields for new college graduates.

With campuses in Augusta and Bangor, and eight University College Centers in communities across Maine, UMA is one of only two entities in the University of Maine System with a statewide mission. Serving over 6,000 students, UMA is the third largest entity in the University of Maine System and fifth largest institution of higher learning in Maine.

Since assuming duties as President in January of this year, President Conneely has focused attention on both the exceptional scholarship taking place at UMA, its affordability, and its mission of access to higher education for Mainers across the state.

Six UMA faculty members are Fulbright Scholars and the institution has been nationally ranked by U.S. News & World Report for its online Bachelor’s degree program and Bachelor’s degree for Veterans. With over 300 students who are Veterans and active military, UMA has also been named a military friendly school by G.I. Jobs Magazine for the past five years.

Mostly Maine Composers Concert

Featuring a work for flute and harp by UMA Professor of Music Richard Nelson

D’Anna Fortunato, mezzo-soprano
Peter H. Bloom, flute, alto flute, bass flute and piccolo
Thomas Hill, clarinet
Mary Jane Rupert, piano and harp

Saturday, September 24, 2016 at 3:00 pm

University of Maine Augusta
Jewett Auditorium
46 University Drive, Augusta, ME 04330

Free and open to the public.

Information: richardn@maine.edu   (207) 621-3214


“Fortunato was in sumptuous voice.”  – The Boston Globe

“a mezzo-soprano of profound musicality and technical aplomb” –The Village Voice

“her lustrous mezzo-soprano, her warmly communicative musical personality…an irresistible combination”

New York Magazine


Program 

Play of Light (2010, for flute, piccolo, bass flute, and harp) by Richard Nelson (for Bloom and Rupert)

The premiere of Dividend (2016, for voice, flute, clarinet and piano), a new piece written for the occasion by Beth Wiemann, Chair of the Music Department at U Maine Orono

Souvenir for Clarinet and Piano (1990) by Elliott Schwartz, professor emeritus at Bowdoin College

Soliloquy III for Solo Flute (2015) by Elliott Schwartz (written for Peter H. Bloom)

Ah, Winged Muse and other songs by Michael Viens

As It Fell upon a Day for (voice, flute, and clarinet) by Aaron Copland

Kleemation (2003, flute and piano) by Elizabeth Vercoe

Four Fragments from the Canterbury Tales (voice, flute, clarinet, and piano) by Lester Trimble


Mostly Maine Composers Concert Flyer

UMA Professor Rick NelsonGrammy-nominated mezzo-soprano D’Anna Fortunato, an admired favorite on the international concert stage, will celebrate Maine composers in a concert with esteemed colleagues Peter H. Bloom, multiple flutes; Thomas Hill, clarinet; and Mary Jane Rupert, piano and harp.   The program, Mostly Maine Composers, will be a tribute to Elliott Schwartz, the dean of Maine composers, in his 80th year, and will honor several other Maine composers including UMA faculty member Richard Nelson, University of Maine’s Beth Wiemann, Elizabeth Vercoe (Chamberlain, Maine) and Michael Viens (Cape Neddick, Maine). A vivid, wide-ranging concert will provide a dazzling tour of recent works by these pre-eminent Maine composers, together with Aaron Copland’s charming As It Fell Upon a Day and Lester Trimble’s witty and captivating Four Fragments from the Canterbury Tales.   The Maine composers will be on hand to introduce their pieces and to discuss the music in an informal Q&A following the concert.

About the Musicians:

D’Anna Fortunato, mezzo-soprano; Peter H. Bloom, flute, alto flute, bass flute and piccolo; Mary Jane Rupert, piano and harp

Grammy-nominated mezzo-soprano D’Anna Fortunato, called “affecting, superb” by The New York Times,  has performed with pre-eminent American symphonies (Philadelphia, New York Philharmonic, San Francisco, Houston, Cleveland, Boston, Dallas, and others); has performed leading roles with New York City Opera, Glimmerglass Opera, Florida Grand Opera, Opera San Jose and other companies; and has appeared in festivals including Berlin’s Spectrum Concerts, the Rome Bach Festival, Marlboro, Casals, Tanglewood, Blossom, and Newport.   In 2006, she was a Grammy nominee in three categories including best classical vocal recording.   She has recorded 40 CDs on labels such as Harmonia Mundi, London/Decca, Sony Classical, Nonesuch, Koch International, Naxos, and Albany.  A regional Met Winner, she also received the Naumburg Prize and the Jacopo Peri Award.  She serves on the faculty of the New England Conservatory.   The Village Voice called her a “mezzo-soprano of profound musicality and technical aplomb,” while New York Magazine praised “her lustrous mezzo-soprano, her warmly communicative musical personality…an irresistible combination.”

Flutist Peter H. Bloom performs in the U.S., Canada, Europe and the Far East; is featured on 40 recordings (Sony Classical, Dorian, Leo Records, other labels); and is a winner of the American Musicological Society’s Noah Greenberg Award.  The Boston Globe called his playing “a revelation for unforced sweetness and strength,” while Jazz Improv praised his “exquisite melody.”  He has given lectures and master classes across the globe on such wide-ranging topics as historical performance, new music, musical improvisation, jazz standards, exploratory jazz, and masterworks of the literature.  He serves on the faculty of the Snow Pond Composers Workshop, is contributing editor for Noteworthy Sheet Music, and is historical performance consultant to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston.

Pianist/harpist Mary Jane Rupert, acclaimed by The New York Times as exhibiting “indeed, real sensitivity,” has given solo recitals from Carnegie Hall to Beijing Concert Hall and has appeared as pianist and harpist with symphony orchestras and chamber ensembles throughout the United States.   She serves on the music faculties of Tufts University and Boston College and taught previously at Western Michigan, Missouri Western, MIT and Wellesley College. Dr. Rupert holds a BM in Piano from Oberlin College, and an MM in Piano, MM in Harp and DM in Piano Performance and Music Literature from Indiana University.  Bloom and Rupert tour the globe as the Duo “2” (“the very best players playing at the height of their powers” – University of Canberra, Australia).

Thomas Hill, clarinetThomas Hill, clarinet, praised as “among the best clarinetists anywhere” (The Boston Musical Intelligencer) is widely engaged as soloist and ensemble performer.  He has performed, toured, recorded and broadcast throughout the Americas and in Asia as a member of the Aeolian Chamber Players (New York City) and the Boston Chamber Music Society. Mr. Hill was principal clarinetist of the Boston Philharmonic for 22 years, and has served as principal clarinetist of the New Haven Symphony, The Long Beach Symphony, the Handel and Haydn Society, the Mainly Mozart Festival Orchestra, the San Diego Symphony and the Cascade Festival Orchestra in Oregon. He has performed with both the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops. Mr. Hill holds both a Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree with Honors from the New England Conservatory. He also attended the Cleveland Institute of Music where he was a member of the class of Robert Marcellus. His teaching credentials have included artist-professor affiliations with the New England Conservatory, the Boston Conservatory, the Longy School of Music, the Foundation for Chinese Performing Arts and the university systems of New York, California, Massachusetts and Missouri.

About Richard Nelson:

Composer/guitarist Richard Nelson is Professor of Music and head of the Sonic Arts and Composition Concentration at the University of Maine at Augusta. He is recognized for his skillful integrations of contemporary jazz and classical composition and performance. His works have been performed by ensembles such as ALEA III, the Aardvark Jazz Orchestra, the Charleston Symphony Orchestra, Speculum Musicae, and his own Imaginary Ensemble at venues including the Piccolo Spoleto Festival, Miller Theater, the University of Cape Town (South Africa), and other U.S. festivals, clubs, and universities. He has received fellowships and awards from the BMI Jazz Composers Workshop, the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, the Charles Ives Center, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, among others.   As a guitarist, he has performed across the U.S. and abroad.  AllAboutJazz.com called him “an ambitious and daring composer,” praising his CD Pursuit as “a distinctive synthesis of modern jazz and contemporary orchestral music.” A major current project is a collection of compositions for New York City-based Makrokosmos Orchestra, which Nelson co-leads with colleague Tim O’Dell. Nelson studied composition at Indiana University with Donald Erb (Masters degree) and at Columbia University with Mario Davidovsky (Doctor of Musical Arts). He was a Visiting Artist at the University of Cape Town in 2004.

For information about the other composers on the program, contact Rebecca DeLamotte.

The Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine [HHRC], in partnership with the Kennebec Valley Art Association, is proud to announce “Equal Protection of the Laws”, an exhibition featuring the work of 17 Maine artists inspired by the rights granted by the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. “Equal Protection of the Laws” will be open to the public on Thursday, September 22nd and will be on display at the Klahr Center until Friday, December 16th.

The opening reception for the exhibit will be from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. with a program beginning at 5:30 p.m. on September 22nd. This event is free to attend and refreshments will be provided. Donations are always gratefully accepted.

The Klahr Center, located on the campus of the University of Maine at Augusta, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday or by appointment.

Several additional programs are being planned for the fall in association with this exhibition as well. To stay up to date on events at the Michael Klahr Center, visit hhrcmaine.org and sign up to be included on the HHRC’s email list.

Susan Bickford’s New Media Installation, [stillness], on view at UMA’s Danforth Gallery, reception September 29, from 4:00 – 6:00.

(stillness), an immersive projected installation with five simultaneous videos by artist Susan Bickford is currently on display at UMA’s Danforth Gallery through October 27th.

Combining the natural phenomenon of the reversing falls in Sheepscot Village with a collaborative performance, Bickford produces five videos for the viewer to experience. The gallery becomes a vast chasm to feel, see and hear the wonders of this pristine Maine location.

(stillness) at the Danforth GalleryBickford’s installation is presented as part of UMA’s 2016/2017 academic theme of climate change. This year presents a significant opportunity to explore and discuss the causes and effects of climate change, but also how individual and collective efforts can make a difference.

Susan Bickford lives in Newcastle, ME, and teaches visual art at UMA. She has her BFA ’85 and Bachelors of Industrial Design ’86 from Rhode Island School of Design and her MFA ’01 in Studio Arts from Maine College of Art. She has exhibited in such places as the Englewood Art Center in Englewood, Florida; in the Vanguard component of the Maine Woman Pioneers show at the University of New England and the Portland Museum of Art Biennial. She has designed projections for numerous theater productions including “Metamorphoses” at Colby College and “Sunday in the Park with George” at the Heartwood Regional Theater Company.

Bickford utilizes her art practice to bring the public awareness back to that sense of belonging. Her message is very simple; “We are a part of this.” Her work does not directly focus on environmental problems but instead it seeks to present an opportunity for meditative reflection within the nature. Visit http://www.susanbickfordinteractive.com to view other works by the artist.

The Danforth Gallery, located in Jewett Hall on the UMA campus, is free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday from 9:30 AM to 4:30 PM, and on Fridays from 9:30AM to 1:00PM.

Sandy Maisel, professor and Chair of the Department of Government at Colby College“Elections 2016 – Significance for Maine’s People” is the title of a forum to be held at the University of Maine at Augusta on Sunday September 18, 2016. The forum will start at 2:00 PM in Jewett Auditorium. The speakers will be two well-known analysts and scholars of politics: Sandy Maisel, professor and Chair of the Department of Government at Colby College, and Mark Brewer, Acting Chair of the Political Science Department at the University of Maine. The forum is sponsored by the Senior College of the University of Maine at Augusta.

The forum will be presented shortly after Labor Day, when the presidential campaigns in a most unusual epoch in U.S political history will be reaching their highest pitch. The panel of experts will attempt to reach beyond the political rhetoric and drama to tease out how the results, one way or the other, are likely to effect the future of Maine’s people. They have been asked to address the respective platforms of the Democratic and Republican platforms and, depending on the down-ballot results, how and to what extent the platforms may be implemented. At stake in the elections are significant national decisions, such as the selection of Supreme Court Justices, tax policy, reaction to threats of global warming, national security, immigration, race relations and health care. With its aging population, out-migration of young people, resource-based economy, Maine stands to be vitally effected by the outcome of the elections. Not only is the choice of President crucial in the direction taken in all these areas, selection of legislators at both national and state levels also stand in the balance and can influence the future of Medicare, the opioid crisis, Social Security, income and property taxes, adaptation to climate change, and college debt, among many significant issues. The intention of the forum is to provide information, not to stage a debate. There will be ample opportunity for members of the audience to ask questions and make comments to the speakers.

Mark Brewer, Acting Chair of the Political Science Department at the University of MaineIn his research, Mark D. Brewer, Ph.D., focuses on political behavior, with research areas including partisanship and electoral behavior at the mass and elite levels, linkages between public opinion and public policy and the interactions that exist between religion and politics in the United States. In the Forum he will address the Platform of the Republican Party.  L. Sandy Maisel, Ph. D., is founding director of the Goldfarb Center for Public Affairs and Civic Engagement at Colby, has written more than twenty books on campaign and elections quality, the two party system, and at one time was himself a candidate for the Democratic nomination for Congress from Maine. His current research includes Jewish American Political Identity and Public Lives of Ex-Presidents. In his remarks he will look at the Platform of the Democratic Party.

UASC forums are free and open to the Public. Free refreshments are served.

UMA Senior College is open to persons of fifty years or older, and their spouses. Its all-volunteer faculty offers programs of courses on a wide variety of subjects for nominal membership and tuition fees.   It provides monthly musical programs – Concerts at Jewett- for low admission prices. The Forum on the Future produces four forums a year on topics which are both timely and significant for Maine people. Coming up are forums on Maine’s climate future, the economy, and transportation for elderly people.

For questions contact UMA Senior College at (207) 621-3551, or e-mail UMASC.maine.edu. Check our website at www.umasc.org.

Corlew Book Cover - FINALLY, A SONG FROM SILENCEUniversity of Maine at Augusta (UMA) Assistant Professor of Psychology Laura Kate “Kati” Corlew recently published a book called, Finally, a Song from Silence (poetry from when I was young).

A selection of writings from before she was a psychologist, a researcher, and a professor, Corlew blends developmental psychology with personal experience to reflect on a time when she was a troubled teen who poured her heart into poetry, addressing various topics like identity development, depression and suicide, love and heartbreak, and gender, sex, and sexuality.

With a Ph.D. and an M.A. in Community and Cultural Psychology, the book is a change from Corlew’s many published works in quantitative and qualitative analysis in the American Journal of Community Psychology, The Encyclopedia of Primary Prevention and Health PromotionThe Community Psychologist, the Global Journal of Community PsychologyWeather, Climate and Society, the Review of Disability Studies and Centerings.

Corlew has been a professor at UMA since 2014 teaching psychology classes as part of UMA’s Social Sciences degree program, primarily on the Bangor campus. Prior to her position at UMA, Corlew did research in psychological recovery and risk perception regarding natural disasters and climate change.

For more information on the book visit: https://songfromsilence.wordpress.com/

The University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College announce the 2016-2017 concert schedule for the 14th season of “Concerts at Jewett” held at UMA’s Jewett Hall Auditorium.

The series, sponsored by local businesses and private contributions, features talented Maine performers representing a variety of musical forms.  Profits will be used to subsidize present and future lectures and concerts to benefit the community.

2016/2017 Season:

  • Sunday, October 16, 2016, 2PM – Fiddle-icious. A multi-generational orchestra from across Maine, preserving the cultural heritage of Maine, French and Canadian fiddle music and step-dancing; directed by legendary Don Roy.  At Cony High School, 60 Pierce Drive, Augusta.
  • Sunday, November 6, 2016, 2PM – (snow date Nov.20) – Don Campbell Honors American Veterans. Don and his band join UMA/UMASC in honoring Veterans of all ages and branches of the military. Vets admitted free. Invite an American hero to join you for this very special concert.
  • Sunday, December 18, 2016, 2PM – A Christmas Concert with Downeast Brass and Jay Zoller, organist.This annual concert features a stellar brass quintet, an outstanding organist and a restored 1866 E.&G.G. Hook organ. At South Parish Congregational Church, 9 Church St., Augusta.
  • Sunday, January 8, 2017, 2PM – (snow date Jan.15) – Dave Rowe and The Squid Jiggers return to Jewett at our audience’s request. Dave presents his reflective originals and, when paired with Troy Bennett, great vocal and instrumental harmonies on robust Maine and Maritime songs.
  • Sunday, February 12, 2017, 2PM – (snow date Feb. 19) – The Plaid Dragonflies. Enthusiastically recommended by Senior College students, Tess Zardus and Val Bennett will present a medley of popular songs from the 40’s through today.
  • Sunday, March 5, 2017, 2PM – ( no snow date) – Choro Louco, a Brazilian Choro band from Portland will present the unique rhythms and intricate harmonies of Brazil’s Choro music.
  • Sunday, April 9, 2017, 2PM – Sarah Geller, a young Farmington native who performs in NYC, will share her outstanding violin skills. “Ms. Geller’s talents shine through to audiences who thrill at her abundant musicality and probing interpretations.”  Michael Shapiro, Music Dir. and Conductor, The Chappaqua Orchestra (NY).
  • Sunday, May 7, 2017, 2PM – Masanobu Ikemiya, a highly acclaimed concert pianist, peace activist and environmental steward. He is also a Concerts @ Jewett favorite, featuring intricate pieces by master composers, light-hearted ragtime rhythms and videos of places and projects that inspire him.

All concerts, except for Oct. 16th and Dec. 18th are at UMA Jewett Auditorium.  Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza of Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop and at the door. Subscriptions (7 or more concerts) at reduced rates are available by mail.  Be a PATRON – contribute $100 or more to the Community Presentations Fund and attend all concerts free.  For further information, call 621-3551, email umasc@maine.edu, or visit concertsatjewett.com.

The U.S. Department of Education recently announced that the University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) has been selected to participate in the Second Chance Pell Pilot Program.

The program provides Pell grants to students in a limited number of state and federal prisons and is expected to help improve the chances of successful and productive reentry after prison release. Only 69 colleges and universities were selected out of 200 eligible applicants.

Representatives from UMA, the Maine Department of Corrections (MDOC), and University College (UC) attended an inaugural convening of the Second Chance Pell Pilot Program in Washington, D.C. this month to accept the award with other selected colleges and universities nationwide.

UMA has been providing post-secondary education to Maine State Prison (MSP) inmates through generous private funding from the Sunshine Lady Foundation (SLF) for the past 10 years. This May, UMA graduated 17 students at the Maine State Prison.

The Second Chance Pell Pilot Project will enable UMA to build on the success of its current prison education program through continued educational offerings; in addition, UMA will expand post-secondary education opportunities to a second MDOC facility, the Maine Correctional Center in Windham, ME, in 2017.

They did not have internet access.  They were allowed a pencil, their desire to learn and access to professors from the University of Maine at Augusta (UMA).

Through the entire process, which for some inmates took close to a decade from start to finish, they weathered the daily trials that come from both the stigmatization of a felony conviction and the weight of their own past.

Dorris Buffet and President Conneely

Dorris Buffet and President Conneely

Class time was largely a refuge from prison life, and to participate in the UMA degree program was a privilege.  Supported by The Sunshine Lady Foundation, a philanthropic focus for Doris Buffet, sister to billionaire investor Warren Buffet, the program’s screening process is rigorous, thorough and realistic. It recognizes that lives do not change in a short period of time, but validates the concept that education is, over time, a transformative choice that creates its own orbit of freedom.

“This program changed the conversation,” one inmate said during the Maine State Prison Graduation Celebration, held on June 15 at the prison.  “I would be in line listening to a conversation in front of me about philosophy, while the conversation behind me was about drugs.”

The graduates, who earned either an Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies or a Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies, faced unusual challenges to reach the day of their graduation.  These included negotiating the constraints of prison life, where one’s best intentions to stay out of trouble can be defined by some else’s determination to cross your path.  At times class time was interrupted by the blare of an alarm, a notification of trouble and call to assemble in the gym for a head count.  In prison there are no time outs, exceptions, or days off.

Defining a New Paradigm for Incarceration

Even studying could pose a problem if access to needed textbooks was not readily available, or being viewed as weak by some for pursuing course work.  In prison, weakness is often construed as an invitation to abuse.

The day of graduation was like most others.  Family gathered to express their sense of pride in the achievements of their sons, brothers, or fathers.  The guest of honor, Doris Buffet, one of the greatest benefactors of prison educational programs across the United States, was escorted past several security checkpoints by Dr. Joseph Fitzpatrick, Commissioner of the Maine State Department of Corrections.

Portland-based WGME CBS 13 was on hand to film a story that would air during the early evening newscast.

Upon arrival in the large room that would serve as the graduation site she was welcomed by Randall Liberty, Warden of the Maine State Prison.  He personally greeted many of the University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) faculty and administrators as they arrived, thanking them for their work to benefit inmates.

2016 Maine State Prison GraduationThe graduation room featured a podium with microphone, seats for graduates, and tables for guests.  Ms. Buffett was seated with her companions strategically adjacent to the podium, a place befitting the guest of honor.  Without Ms. Buffet and her Sunshine Lady Foundation there likely would be no graduation, only the droll, unbroken rhythms of prison life.  On this day possibilities underscored presentations by a host of dignitaries including Dr. James Conneely, President of UMA and Deborah Meehan, Director of UMA’s University College Center in Rockland.

Before the playing of Pomp and Circumstance and the procession of graduates in mortarboards and gowns, Ms. Buffet chatted with a steady stream of well-wishers, some of whom were additional inmates currently pursuing degrees.  They were given permission to attend on a case-by-case basis.

A Glimpse beyond Stereotypes

“My brother (Warren) came to a (prison) graduation and said ‘there’s such love in this room,’” Doris said.  The seemingly incongruous juxtaposition of “love” with the context of a prison graduation was apropos of the event and atmosphere in the room.  Transcendent hope might accurately describe the setting on this day as a guard opened a side door, ushering graduates into the room.

They marched to applause and cheers in single file to the far side of the room, abruptly changing direction to take their seats across the front of the room.

Soon, despite the lack of mobility for graduates and guests alike, the setting dissolved into the background of the occasion.  The graduation became a time to reminisce on classes, give thanks to professors and supporters, and evoke lessons learned.

Bill Halpin, a UMA Adjunct Faculty Member in Humanities, offered a lengthy invocation that explored both theology and philosophy with surprising depth.

The tone was decidedly lighter as Meehan took to the podium.  A slight woman with a ready smile and effervescent presence, Meehan drew from an easy rapport with the inmates that was borne of experience.  She had been involved in the day-to-day administrative details of the program, including the hurdles inmates sometimes faced.

“Today is a remarkable and celebratory day as we recognize the academic achievements of these 17 men,” Meehan said.  She next spoke directly to the graduates, effortlessly delivering one of the best applause lines of the day by upending the cart into which guests had placed their stereotypes about prison life.

“The transformation that we have 2016 Maine State Prison Graduationwitnessed, from the beginnings of your college experience until today, is nothing short of profound,” she stated.  “As students, you have learned how to learn, how to expand your thoughts and interests, and even developed interests you never knew you had.  In fact, as a result of Ellen Taylor’s Women and Gender Studies course, some of you are now self-declared feminists – which thrills me!”  Meehan grinned to the booming laughter that followed.

Later in the program Abdi Awad, an inmate and native of Somalia, who received the Perseverance Award, declared that he had, as a result Professor Taylor’s course, become a feminist.  Awad won the Perseverance Award in part because he could not speak English when he started the program, but not only learned a new language but went on to earn an Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies degree with honors.

Paying it Forward, Inmates as Role Models

Meehan encapsulated the importance of Doris Buffet and The Sunshine Lady Foundation, who made the transformative opportunity possible.

She pointed out that in the 1980’s there were 350 college programs in prisons nationwide.  Higher education was an integral part of prison life.  That changed after the signing of the violent Crime Control Act in 1994, when federal financial aid was removed for those incarcerated.

“When colleges left prisons, the hope left also and for a long time it seemed that nobody cared,” Meehan said. “… and when uneducated prisoners got out, they often went right back into prison.  But thankfully someone has cared!  Hope was restored for you and 40 plus other UMA graduates (of the UMA Maine State Prison degree program) by someone who recognizes that education provides you with a more fulfilling life, and quality of life, while you are here.”

Thanking Doris for the over $2 million she has gifted to prisoner education in Maine, Meehan underscored a theme of the day, namely that the philanthropy of a caring individual and her foundation has provided a sea change in the way that a group of convicted felons experience the world around them.

With opportunity comes responsibility, Meehan stressed.

“I ask you to think about the next generation of college students who will follow you here at Maine State Prison,” she noted. “We count on you to help us recruit capable candidates and to encourage, support and mentor them through the college program.  In general, and within the larger Maine State Prison community, be great role models, demonstrate leadership, and continue to make us proud of you. By doing so, you pay honor to this program which has meant so much to you.”

During his address President Conneely praised the choices made by the graduates.

“I am here to praise your achievements and recognize the character that each of you has demonstrated in pursuit to better yourself,” Conneely stated.  “Your stories are varied and personal.  We all know individuals who have overcome insurmountable odds, and through perseverance, went on to both rebuild their lives and earn a college degree.”

“In every circumstance leading to such success, there is a choice that was made to take a different path,” Conneely continued.  “By pursuing an education you chose a different path.  You have taken the opportunity to redefine yourselves as individuals, essentially saying that where you are is not who you are.”

After remarks there was the formal conferring of degrees by President Conneely, Dr. Brenda McAleer, Dean, UMA College of Professional Studies and Dr. Gregory Fahy, Dean, UMA College of Arts and Sciences.

Dr. Joseph Fitzpatrick, Commissioner, Department of Corrections, also offered a welcome. Remarks were also given by Randall Liberty, Warden, Maine State Prison and Leo Hylton, who received his Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies and represented students.

This sentiment encapsulated the festivities.  This was a time to recognize the power of choice and transformation.  That as much as any other, serves as a fitting punctuation to Warren Buffet’s observation about the prison graduation that he attended.

Whether love, hope, transformation or all three rolled into one, the 2016 Maine State Prison Graduation defied easy stereotypes.  That alone was cause for celebration, but there was so much more …

2016 Best Online Colleges and Universities BadgePresident James Conneely announced that the University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) has been named one of the “Best Online Colleges and Universities” in a 2016 ranking by College Choice.

“More than 40 percent of our students take classes online,” said UMA President James Conneely. “It’s a priority that we ensure they have a quality and meaningful collegiate experience and that they have the resources they need to be successful in obtaining their degrees.”

The College Choice rankings are based on factors such as the engaging methods of teaching, and technological resources, number of online degrees offered, academic reputation, affordability, and scholarly quality of the faculty teaching online courses.

Their data comes from the National Center for Educational Statistics, from the websites of the universities themselves, and publications like U.S. News and World Report.

With campuses in Augusta and Bangor, eight local centers in communities across Maine, and 12 degree programs available completely online, UMA provides access to high quality distance, online and on site education, excellent student support, and innovative professional and liberal arts programs.

See the full ranking »

Augusta, Maine – From his corner desk overlooking a large classroom equipped with computers and a Redbird FMX flight trainer (flight simulator), Greg Jolda reviewed the first four-years of the aviation program at the University of Maine at Augusta (UMA).

Aviation Student Shows off her WingsA 20-year veteran pilot in the United States Air Force with over 3,000 military flight hours and another 900 instructional hours, Jolda also taught at the United States Military Academy at West Point before moving to Maine.

Since its inception at UMA, the third largest public university in Maine with a history of serving traditional aged students, non-traditional students and veterans, Jolda has been intimately involved with every aspect of UMA’s aviation program.

During the first year students earn their private pilot’s license.  They next earn their instrument rating during the second year.  The third year brings a focus on earning a commercial rating for single and multi-engine planes, giving students the credentials to fly for hire.

Fourth year studies lead to the designation of instructor pilot.  Instructor pilots are able to train students in all phases of flight including instrument use.  Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in Aviation.


Now poised to expand in range or program offerings and the size of the student body, Jolda says that an Unmanned Arial Vehicle (UAV) certification track as a second track for the curriculum’s fourth-year is being considered. 
Fourth year students would have the choice of pursuing the current path leading to the designation of instructor pilot, or pursuing a UAV pilot certification.  That addition to the curriculum may be a year or two away, Jolda says. 

In May, Ben Rogers became the first to graduate from the program.  He plans to attend Officer Candidate School in the U.S. Marines and fly C-130’s and fighter jets.  Those are exactly the kinds of career opportunities first envisioned for the program, Jolda says.

UMA Aviation Student with PlaneThe program is rigorous by any measure.  Successful students find a good balance between their classes and flight training.  Students needing housing have been successful in finding accommodations in or near the school, and the school maintains a list of quality rentals adjacent to campus.

Just miles from the Augusta State Airport in the central corridor of a largely rural state with a high density of airstrips, UMA is ideally located to support the long-term needs of its aviation program.  Named a military friendly school by G.I. Jobs Magazine for the past five years, the program features a level of flexibility that allows students to pursue some non-flight related courses online.  Veterans and civilians who have FAA Certifications often receive credit for their certifications, allowing them to reach their goals more quickly.

The program began in the fall of 2013 when former UMA president Allyson Handley engaged in a private-public partnership with Maine Instrument Flight, a highly regarded flight school located at the Augusta State Airport.  The partnership provides students with the opportunity to attain their Bachelor’s degree and become an FAA-certified commercial pilot under one program.

Dr. James Conneely, UMA’s new President, is a private pilot who understands the intricacies of the industry and recently spoke as a guest at Maine Instrument Flight’s 70th birthday celebration.

“Maine Instrument Flight provides flight training and ground training with their instructors in our facilities,” Jolda explained.  UMA provides student support and academic courses leading to a bachelor’s degree.

The addition of the Redbird RMX was a leap forward for the program.  The state-of-the-art flight simulator and trainer allows students to practice flying from any airport in the world, while affordably gaining core skills.

UMA Aviation Student Taking Off from Augusta Aiport“This provides realism for the flight training,” said Jolda.  One of only two in the state of Maine (the other being at the Sanford Seacoast Regional Airport), the full-motion simulator is used to supplement students’ flight training.  Instructors can control weather conditions and add challenges such as disabling an engine, Jolda says.

Among the other selling points of the program is overall affordability.  Because of UMA’s low public tuition rates, the Aviation program is significantly less expensive than comparable programs.  Veterans with military education benefits may pay up to 100% of tuition and fees.  For more information on program costs, visit uma.edu/aviationcosts.

Students receive flight instruction and hours, insurance, and tuition.  This is enhanced by the availability of financial aid and scholarships.  The door-to-door student experience is further supported by comprehensive job placement services and an industry in need of pilots, with demand expected to continue.

On this latter point, Jolda says that UAV applications across a host of industries will be a safe bet for widespread expansion. 

Uses for UAV’s will include search-and-rescue, engineering, and possibly even product delivery services.


UMA Day Logos - UMA, Sea Dogs, UC

UMA Night at the Portland Sea Dogs
Wednesday, August 3, Game Time at 7 p.m.
Hadlock Field – 271 Park Ave, Portland, Maine 04102

Deadline to purchase tickets – 4pm July 27th!

Join UMA students, alumni, faculty and staff and their families as we watch a Portland Sea Dogs game, featuring the first pitch thrown by UMA President James Conneely.

The event features an all-inclusive ticket, with special discounts for students and alumni:

  • Special third base seating together with the everyone attending from UMA
  • A delicious buffet, from 5:30 – 8pm, including hotdogs, hamburgers, pulled BBQ chicken, baked beans, coleslaw, Sea Dog biscuits and soft drinks.
  • Screening of UMA multi-media presentations
  • UMA and UC table in concourse with special gifts

Tickets:

  • Regular Price $26 per person – purchase online
  • Augusta and Bangor Offices of Student Life: $10 tickets to students – purchase online
  • UMA Alumni: $15 for all alumni and family members (up to 50 tickets discounted) – purchase online
  • UC Rockland: $10 each for students tickets – purchase online
  • UC Saco – Students Free; $15 for family members up to 3.
    Contact Dan Philbrick danielp@maine.edu or Joseph DeMotta joseph.demotta@maine.edu to get tickets
  • UC Rumford/So. Paris: Students Free; $15 for family members up to 3.
    Contact James Bradley james.bradley@maine.edu

Purchase tickets

Discounts will be factored in during your purchase (with the exception of UC Saco and UC Rumford/So. Paris Center students who should contact the representatives indicated in the discount list above).

Mark TardifUniversity of Maine at August (UMA) President James Conneely has named Mark Tardif as Executive Director of Strategic Marketing and Public Affairs.

In his new position Tardif will oversee the Office of Public Affairs, which includes all UMA efforts in the fields of community relations, public relations / marketing, social media, internal / external communications and publications, and web management. With campuses in Bangor and Augusta, and eight University College (UC) Centers across Maine with a system-wide mission, UMA serves the third largest student population in the University of Maine System.

Conveying the Full Measure of UMA and UC

Tardif will oversee a series of strategic marketing, communications and branding initiatives that have been initiated by President Conneely, who took office in January. Among these efforts is the comprehensive rebranding of UMA to more accurately reflect the full measure of its leading-edge leadership, achievement (six faculty who are Fulbright Fellowship recipients), service and innovation.

These marketing and communications initiatives include strategic messaging, web site and logo redesign. A public unveil of the new brand designs for the UMA community, media, stakeholders and general public is planned for the fall of 2016.

A Lewiston native and graduate of St. Dominic Academy of Auburn, most recently Tardif served as Director of Marketing and Communications for University College (UC), a unit of UMA with a system-wide mission to deliver over 100 degree and certificate programs online and at eight Centers in communities across Maine.

Tardif has held a teaching, journalism, administrative and communications positions in Maine, Massachusetts and London, U.K.

A Champion of Integrated Marketing

During his decade of service to Unity College, Tardif held multiple positions. These included serving as Associate Director of College Communications and Associate Director of Media Relations. In addition to participating in the creation of the first Department of Marketing in the history of Unity College, he was responsible for managing a successful multi-year branding campaign that gained a national profile for the environmental college. An aspect of that campaign involved strategic use of the tagline America’s Environmental College.

He also managed collaborative communications / marketing projects with a variety of national concerns including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology School of Architecture, 350.org, and the Responsible Endowments Coalition. The national identity solidified by Tardif’s efforts led to Unity College’s nomination in 2013 for the inaugural Greenest University of the Year Award. It was the only institution of higher learning from the United States that was nominated. The national profile created by Tardif’s efforts led to Unity College’s nomination in 2013 for the inaugural Responding to Climate Change (RTC) Greenest University of the Year Award. It was the only institution of higher learning in the United States that was nominated.

As Public Relations Officer at Thomas College he promoted the first guaranteed job placement program in the United States and advanced the integrated marketing concept. He championed new programs and strategic initiatives such as a partnership with the Maine Criminal Justice Academy,

An English educator, Tardif taught English at Central Maine Community College and Southern Maine Community College. While at Northeastern University he studied international marketing and business in the United Kingdom (U.K.), was a news reporter for the Enfield and Haringey Advertiser newspapers of London, U.K., and served as an intern on the City Desk at the Boston Globe.

His articles has appeared in a variety of publications including College Planning & Management magazine, The Higher Education Workplace magazine, Inside Higher Education, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and University Business magazine, among others.

A varsity rower at Northeastern University, he also coached men’s and women’s crew at Bates College.

Tardif earned a Bachelor of Science degree in English from Northeastern University, a Master of Arts in Teaching, English Education, from Boston University, and a Master of Science, Computer Technology Education, from Thomas College, where he served as a commencement speaker in 2001.

University College is online at Learn.Maine.edu. The University of Maine at Augusta is online at UMA.edu.

President Conneely recently did an interview on WGAN’s Morning show. He spoke about UMA’s statewide mission in serving adult & non-traditional learners as well as the importance of serving Maine as part of the University of Maine System’s One University initiative.

WGAN Interview »

UMA Provost Joseph Szakas today announced the University of Maine at Augusta’s 2016 Spring Full-Time Dean’s list and the Fall 2015/Spring 2016 Part-Time Dean’s List. The Full-Time Dean’s list is issued once a semester and the Part-Time Dean’s list is issued once a year. See the requirements for each list »

Spring 2016 Full-Time Dean’s List

Androscoggin

Paul Cote, Auburn; Jon Dupee, Auburn; Kathryn Breed, Durham; Corinne Davenport, Durham; Robert Stevens, Greene; Sierra Sirois, Leeds; Cheryl Carter, Lewiston; Miriah Dinwiddie, Lewiston; Miranda Dixon, Lewiston; Jennifer Doyon, Lewiston; Dan Ireland, Lewiston; Mary Mccarthy, Lewiston; Bethany St Hilaire, Lewiston; Sarah Starkey, Lewiston; Patricia Varney, Lewiston; Marcea Crawford, Lisbon Falls; Heather Bronish, Livermore Falls; Michael Hebert, Livermore Falls; Walt Whitman, Livermore Falls; Naomi Banks, Sabattus; Joshua Martin, Sabattus; Jennifer Fusco, Turner; Cassea Leavitt, Turner; April Thrasher, Turner

Aroostook

Ashley Drinkall, Caribou; Casey Barton, Cary Plt; Jessica Chasse, Connor Twp; Abigail Theriault, Connor Twp; Sasha Valcourt, Fort Kent; Ashley Drew, Houlton; Emily Hanson, Houlton; Katelynn McClure, Houlton; Jonathan McQuarrie, Houlton; Jessica Caron, Linneus; Shasta Shields, Linneus; Noah Jacques, Littleton; Timothy Cook, Monticello; Bethany Cheyenne Goldsmith-Nichols, Monticello; Anthony Pranses, Portage

Cumberland

Michael Barry, Brunswick; Amy Feeley, Brunswick; Jordan Johnson, Brunswick; Cara Mia, Brunswick; Gabriel Smith, Brunswick; Jennifer Freeman, Cumberland Center; Crystal Cain Castro, Gorham; Ellen Stoops, Harpswell; Rachel Ruel, Harrison; Sarah Howe, Naples; Angelika Demers, New Gloucester; Melissa Robertson, New Gloucester; Christine Auclair, Portland; Jon Dow, Portland; Adam Frederick, Portland; Kevin Martin, Portland; Krysten Rich, Portland; Jonathan Call, Scarborough; Nadezda Hinds, Scarborough; Evelyn Johnston, Sebago; Michelle Aliberto, Standish; Taliesin Amero, Windham; Ruth Klemanski, Windham; Laura Brooks, Yarmouth

Franklin

Jessica Savage, Avon; Sharon Doray, Chesterville; Michaela Kavanah-Koehn, East Wilton; Erica Bracy, Freeman Twp; Brianna Farrington, Jay; Dorine Wright, Jay; Benjamin Hitchcock, Kingfield; Ericka Tidmore, Kingfield; Janna Winslow, New Sharon; Danielle Wilbur, Phillips; Patrick Carlton, Wilton

Hancock

Wesley Shepard, Amherst; Savannah Raiten, Blue Hill; Gayle Chambers, Bucksport; Savannah Cole, Bucksport; Eric Kettell, Bucksport; Katie Shook, Bucksport; Colin Barclay, Eastbrook; Stephanie Jordan, Eastbrook; Michelle Merchant, Eastbrook; Leeanna Conners, Ellsworth; Kyle Munn, Ellsworth; Carly Spear, Ellsworth; Harlee Webber, Elsworth; Nathan Eisworth, Franklin; Dana Ralbusky, Hancock; Patrick Skeate, Hulls Cove; Elizabeth Bishop, Lamoine; Malerie Lockhart, Lamoine; Amber May, Lamoine; Carlos Rosales, Lamoine; Lauren White, Lamoine; Vance Eldridge, Orland; Ashley Gray, Orland; Molly Orcutt, Orland; Anna Stockman, Southwest Harbor; Megan Tripler, Swans Island; Colleen Sargent, Trenton

Kennebec

Chad Welch, Albion; Aaminah Aleem, Augusta; Keith Arvanitis, Augusta; Élise Bolduc, Augusta; Carmen Bragg, Augusta; Nicholas Bragg, Augusta; Victor Cociu, Augusta; Keith Daniels, Augusta; Anna DeMerchant, Augusta; Shelby Edwards, Augusta; Michael Emerson, Augusta; Robert Foss, Augusta; Christopher Hall, Augusta; Corey Harris, Augusta; Sarah Harris, Augusta; Noah Hoffman, Augusta; Jay Joslyn, Augusta; Jason Kengott, Augusta; Rayna Knight, Augusta; Pierre Laot, Augusta; Jennifer Lavertu, Augusta; Abby Leach, Augusta; Anthony Lopatosky, Augusta; Roger Mackbach, Augusta; Bethanie Mazzaro, Augusta; Kelly Murphy, Augusta; Zachary Pulsifer, Augusta; Jacob Quimby, Augusta; Kendra Robinson, Augusta; Serena Schnepper, Augusta; Ryan Soucie, Augusta; Rebecca Sproul, Augusta; Nicholas Stiles, Augusta; Dale Varnum, Augusta; Rebecca Wheeler, Augusta; Evelyn Withee, Augusta; Matthew Withee, Augusta; Bradley Bickford, Belgrade; Richard Cormier, Belgrade; Thomas Stinson, Belgrade; Trisha Cowan, Belgrade Lakes; Lauren Pelletier, Belgrade Lakes; Sydnee Cutler, Benton; Taylor Watson, Benton; Ashley Whittemore, Benton; Kannikar Chottisavang, Chelsea; Allison Hutchins, Chelsea; Emily Smithson, China; Michael Hollander, Clinton; Courtney Koller, Clinton; Marc Weymouth, Clinton; Brittany Hanson, Fairfield; Jordyn Poulin, Fairfield; Eric Sander, Fairfield; Roland Choate, Farmingdale; Michael Jordan, Farmingdale; Bonnie Smith, Farmingdale; Paul Fowler, Gardiner; Emily Jamison, Gardiner; Megan Kenyon, Gardiner; Hannah Mercier, Gardiner; Jeffrey Mercier, Gardiner; Gretchen Migliaccio, Gardiner; Elizabeth Norris, Gardiner; Daniel Ouellette, Gardiner; Robert Thompson, Gardiner; Haley McPherson, Hallowell; Abbey Slinker, Hallowell; Alyssa Chabot, Kents Hill; Taylor McFarland, Manchester; Kari Mullen-McLaughlin, Manchester; Rosemary Bryant, Monmouth; Daryl Madore, Monmouth; Diana Timberlake, Monmouth; Jackqulyn Galbreath, Mount Vernon; Kristen Hall, Mount Vernon; Brett Wilson, North Monmouth; Sara Moore, Oakland; Mariah Basinger, Pittston; Brooke Brochu, Pittston; Halee Flewelling, Pittston; Shana Jackson, Pittston; Jessie Kendall, Pittston; Tori MacDougall, Pittston; Dana Storer, Randolph; Jonathon Lawrence, Readfield; Carolyn Anderson, Sidney; Joshua Bonney, Sidney; Samantha Matthews, Sidney; Arik Ross, Sidney; Christina Smith, Sidney; Peggy Breault, South China; Hannah Bridges, South China; Jeanne Hanson, South China; Heather Seigars, South China; Jodi Shaw, South China; Danielle Morin, Vassalboro; Judith Rodriguez Salas, Vassalboro; Michael Allen, Waterville; Dorothy Bolduc, Waterville; Sadie Donovan, Waterville; Holly Gerard, Waterville; Sarah Malloy, Waterville; James McCafferty, Waterville; Jessica Morton, Waterville; Jade Noonan, Waterville; Jeffrey Stout, Waterville; Andrew Webber, Waterville; Ashley Wing, Waterville; Betsy Dufour, Wayne; Daniel Allen, West Gardiner; Leanne Buttery, West Gardiner; Thomas Colfer, West Gardiner; Charlotte MacDonald, West Gardiner; Craig Brann, Windsor; James Longfellow, Windsor; Tammy Atkins Poulin, Winslow; Sara Ferrigan, Winslow; Luke Hendsbee, Winslow; Crystal Morgan, Winslow; Elizabeth Bellegarde, Winthrop; Joseph Emery, Winthrop; Abigail Helm, Winthrop; Caitlin LaFountain, Winthrop; Madison McCarthy, Winthrop; Clinton Pettengill, Winthrop; Daryl Reed, Winthrop; Brandon Rogers, Winthrop

Knox

Molly Kelley, Appleton; Kendall Espinosa, Camden; Douglas Lord, Camden; Rebecca Robinson, Camden; Ashlee Seavey, Camden; Sarah Steele, Camden; Saphrona Stetson, Camden; Leah Davis, Hope; Brenna McAfee, Owls Head; Elizabeth Brown, Rockland; Bethany Clough, Rockland; Nikki Hayes, Rockland; Erik Jackson, Rockland; Debra Lund, Rockland; Rita Robbins, Rockland; Carrie Sachse, Rockland; Marc Belley, Rockport; Violet Bemis, Rockport; Jacqueline Campbell, Rockport; Alyssa Dixon, Rockport; Chase Macioch, Rockport; Barry Saucier, Rockport; Erica Smith, Rockport; Xara Sunne, Rockport; Jocelyn Mclean, South Thomaston; Keariel Peasley, South Thomaston; Tabbitha Johnston, Thomaston; Alayna Joyce, Thomaston; Kerry Thompson, Union; Katheryn Anderson, Washington

Lincoln

Tyson Bailey, Alna; Reilly Kane, Boothbay; Rachel King, Boothbay Harbor; Nicole Taylor, Bremen; Cassandra Burton, Damariscotta; Paige Geroux, Jefferson; Jessica Peaslee, Jefferson; Nicole Mahoney, New Harbor; Maranda Hatch, Newcastle; Zakariah Vanderlaan, Southport; Patricia Carriere, Waldoboro; Logan Gallagher, Waldoboro; Dawn Heal, Waldoboro; Leslie Lorentzen, Waldoboro; Zachary Melvin, Waldoboro; Luke Myers, Waldoboro; Jason Palmer, Waldoboro; Courtney Alexander, Whitefield; Benjamin Garthoff, Whitefield; Caleb McGuire, Whitefield; Katrina Shaw, Whitefield; Rebeccah Smith, Whitefield

Oxford

Laurie Hanscom Harmon, Albany Twp; Savannah Clough, Bethel; Amy Stevens, Buckfield; Marianne Young, Carthage; Kathleen Berberian, Greenwood; Tia Sprague, Greenwood; Tiffany Labbe, Hartford; Jessica Freeman, Mexico; Denielle Richard, Mexico; Maria Brown, Norway; Kelley Evtushek, Norway; Raymond Heikkinen, Norway; Miles Laidlaw, Norway; Aleks Krastins, Oxford; Sheila Albanesi, Rumford; Candace Arsenault, Rumford; Daniel Richard, Rumford; Jessica Rodrigue, Rumford; Nadia Tag, Rumford; Teresa York, Rumford; Jennifer Constantine, South Paris; Diana Davis, South Paris; Naomi Foster, South Paris; Deborah Laverdiere, South Paris; Bryanne Starbird, Waterford; Laura Abbott, West Paris; Martha Thompson, West Paris

Penobscot

Kelsey Best, Bangor; John Birmingham, Bangor; Olivia Bjork, Bangor; Mark Bridges-Music, Bangor; Courtney Carter, Bangor; Carly Cloukey, Bangor; Christina Demmons, Bangor; Nicholas Dorr, Bangor; Susanna Fay, Bangor; Emily Ford, Bangor; Sarah Freeman, Bangor; Elisia Gamlin, Bangor; Mildy Hall, Bangor; Elliot Huguenard, Bangor; Aylah Ireland, Bangor; Amy Jones, Bangor; Erin Kinney, Bangor; Emily Luce, Bangor; Kelly Lyon, Bangor; Teresa McGraw, Bangor; Jordan Platt, Bangor; Marissa Potter, Bangor; Thomas Richmond, Bangor; Jessie Robinson, Bangor; Keely Shorette, Bangor; Ian Stewart, Bangor; Olivia Stowe, Bangor; Jeremy Tanis, Bangor; Jessica Walsh, Bangor; Matthew Clark, Brewer; Amber Clukey, Brewer; Holli Corbett, Brewer; Krystal Higgins, Brewer; Crystal Karim, Brewer; Patrick Nolan, Brewer; Kelli Okyere, Brewer; Kayla Rockwell, Brewer; Anastasia Salls, Brewer; Hannah Wheelock, Brewer; Kellie Moors, Carmel; Andrea Robinson, Carmel; Taylor Jenkins, Clifton; Janice Cross, Corinth; Hollis Kimball, Corinth; Emily Oko, Corinth; Maranda Drouin, Dexter; Sabrina Tatseos, Dexter; Alexander Waite, East Millinocket; Gretchen Currie, Eddington; Skip Van Dyne, Eddington; Brandi-Jo Dewitt, Glenburn; Vivian Larrabee, Glenburn; Danielle Ventucci, Glenburn; Michael Williams, Greenbush; Lance Ambrose, Hampden; Samantha Bowler, Hampden; Haley Brown, Hampden; Megan Collins, Hampden; Reanne Curran-Meether, Hampden; Kimberly Dunham, Hampden; Megan Sommers, Hampden; Jennifer Alley, Hermon; Misty Beylerian, Hermon; Chelsey Henderson, Hermon; Kaitlyn Reynolds, Hermon; Alyson Tarr, Hermon; James Umble, Hermon; Megan Whitney, Hermon; Remay Burke, Holden; Ashlie Page, Holden; Richard Thorp, Holden; Priscilla Clark, Howland; Miranda Milne, Howland; Rachael Doane, Hudson; Suzanne McLay, Kenduskeag; Nicole Ciulla, Lee; Jason Ludden, LEE; Brennan Derepentigny, Levant; Jamey House, Lincoln; Linwood Severance, Lincoln; Kevin Sutherland, Mattamiscontis Twp; Jenna Walsh, Medway; Alana Boisvert, Milford; Terri Brown, Milford; Allyson LaPoint, Milford; Brad O’Brien, Milford; Kathleen Pelkey, Milford; Lorrie Nadeau, Millinocket; Brooke Getchell, Newburgh; Kara Bickford, Newport; Drew Graves, Newport; Monica Aaskov, Old Town; Amanda Bagley, Old Town; Danielle Gray, Old Town; Zachary Levesque, Old Town; Nicholas Moeller, Old Town; Jessica Pike, Old Town; April Sawyer, Old Town; Pamela Frace, Orono; David L’Heureux, Orono; Alicia Nejako, Orono; Staci Plog, Orono; Raelene Bouchard, Orrington; Russell Costain, Orrington; Dusty Hillman, Orrington; Shelly Kearns, Orrington; Emily Leonard, Orrington; Ashlee Mandravelis, Prentiss Twp; Kami Guiggey, Stacyville; Amy Butler, Stetson; Taylor Chasse, Veazie; Laurie Dow, Woodville

Piscataquis

Tucker Dow, Dover Foxcroft; Melissa Higgins, Dover Foxcroft; Jennifer Sylvain, Dover Foxcroft; Tianna Breau, Greenville; Josie Knowles, Sangerville; Lynn Torre, Sangerville; Ashley Mace, Shirley Mills

Sagadahoc

Angela Commeau, Bath; Andrew Reed, Bath; Abbie Kontio, Bowdoinham; Lisa LaPointe, Bowdoinham; Alyssa Rollins, Bowdoinham; Erynn Taylor, Bowdoinham; Sarah Brewer, Phippsburg; Sonia Campbell, Phippsburg; Matthew Carter, Richmond; Sarah Coughlin, Richmond; Alissa Coulombe, Richmond; Elise Faris, Richmond; Jamie Plummer, Richmond; Casandra Sutter, Richmond; Kayla-Ann Taylor, Richmond; Jena Beaulieu, Topsham; Nicholas Little, Topsham; Melissa Ward, Topsham; Kristine Wyman, Topsham; Kit Cates, Woolwich; Linzi Fitzgerald, Woolwich; Hallie Johnston, Woolwich

Somerset

Jamie Kemper, Bingham; Benjamin Snowman, Canaan; Jennifer Snowman, Canaan; Haley Strout, Cornville; Wendy Rolfe, Detroit; Lauren Bean, Embden; Lydia Mather, Fairfield; Danny Chambers, Harmony; Arend Thibodeau, Harmony; Nathan Michaud, Hartland; Brianna Wilshusen, Hartland; Catherine Ayres, Madison; Olivia Demchak, Madison; Rebekah Powell, Madison; Penny Spencer, Moscow; Jennifer Bradley, Palmyra; Kathleen Reheuser, Palmyra; Joshua Whitcomb, Palmyra; Monica Diehl, Pittsfield; Brittney Glencross, Pittsfield; Jennifer Therrien, Pittsfield; Philip Walden, Pittsfield; Melissa Wone, Pittsfield; Heather Elkins, Shawmut; Rebecca Chretien, Skowhegan; Gretchen Clark, Skowhegan; Robin Cochrane-Crane, Solon; Billie Lawrence, Solon; Kaitlyn Babin, Starks

Waldo

Heather Marlow, Belfast; Cassandra Thayer, Belfast; Michelle Vellaro, Belfast; Cassie Shink, Freedom; Krysti Hall, Islesboro; Megan Raymond, Liberty; Maylynn Bubar, Lincolnville; Margaret Fowler, Lincolnville; Elizabeth Heal, Lincolnville; Janelle Thornley, Montville; Russell Hughes, Northport; Katherine Blodgett, Searsmont; Holly Brown, Searsport; Brittany Flewelling, Unity; Joshua Roberts, Unity

Washington

Sammi Gray, Addison; Alicia Roderick, Baileyville; Angelica Underhill, Calais; Donna Dalangauskas, Cherryfield; Carolyn Engels, Harrington; Rebecca Weaver, Machias; Jordan Clark, Milbridge; Kimberly Carter, Princeton; Joh’lene Howard, Princeton; Amanda Khederian, Steuben; Lacey Phelps, Waite

York

Garth Douston, Arundel; Catherine Geren, Biddeford; Mallyssa Leng, Biddeford; Ashley Nadeau-Belanger, Biddeford; Delanie Rouleau, Dayton; Keegan Smith, Lebanon; Jocelyn Acheson, North Waterboro; Rebekah Higgins, North Waterboro; Lisa Hubert, Old Orchard Beach; Emma-Marie Banks, Parsonsfield; Stacy Casvikes, Saco; Miranda Harvey, Saco; George Sevigny, Shapleigh; Lien Fajardo, Springvale

National

Engelfried Bruce, San Ramon, CA
Toth Darby, Port Charlotte, FL
Ledesma Michelle, Cantonment, FL
Dore Gabrielle, Winter Haven, FL
Stratford Jennifer, Idaho Falls, ID
Sallee Cassie, Elizabethtown, KY
Alford Christina, Dayton, OH
Taylor Lisa, Astoria, OR
Sagnip Hope, East Stroudsburg, PA
Kopp Vanessa, Moncks Corner, SC
David Derek, Madison, WI
Ireland DAnn, Casper, WY

International

Samuel Karleen, Kolonia, Micronesia
Elliott Heather, Wainwright, Alberta, Canada
Reul Brittany, Mannheim, Germany

 

Fall 2015/Spring 2016 Part-Time Dean’s List

Androscoggin

Katrina Salmon, Auburn; Karen Richard, Durham; Tonya Robert, Greene; Karen Twidwell, Greene; Jenny Graves, Lewiston; Laura Leighton, Lewiston; Danielle Murphy, Lewiston; Holly Szady, Lewiston; Grace Dube, Lisbon; Jaime Hoar, Lisbon; Libby Wade, Lisbon; Molli Cullins, Lisbon Falls; Daniel Leclair, Minot; Ashley Cass, Poland; Emily Martin, Poland; Laurie French, Sabattus; Choanna LeClair, Sabattus; Amanda Caldwell, Turner; Christianna Caldwell, Turner; Mandy Girard, Turner

Aroostook

Kelly Langley, Chapman; Danielle Dorward, Hammond; Jenna Swallow, Hodgdon; Belinda Langlois, Linneus; Rebecca Fore, Littleton; Josefine Small, Ludlow; Courtney Nelson, Oakfield; Melony Lowery, Orient; Susan Hillegass, Saint David; Carrie Kyllonen, Sherman; Trudee Ramsay, Silver Ridge Twp; Angela Lagasse, Sinclair

Cumberland

Keith McDonald, Bridgton; Dawne Wilcox, Bridgton; Cynthia Anthony, Brunswick; Chad Ceccarini, Brunswick; Emma Clayton, Brunswick; Katherine Gabri, Brunswick; Elizabeth Kinsella, Brunswick; Andrea Maillet, Brunswick; Jennifer Nicholson, Brunswick; Pauline McCann, Casco; Adam Wallace, Freeport; Eric Philbrook, Gray; Janette Laplante, Naples; Jaimee Anderson, Portland; Dylan Charlesworth, Portland; Jean-Claude Kramo, Portland; Molly Wilson, Portland; Jeffrey Lavoie, Scarborough; Melissa Moody, Scarborough; Sabrina Newcomb, Sebago; Alivia Cram, South Portland; Wendy Carey, Westbrook; Garrett Murray, Westbrook; Hannah Keaney, Windham

Franklin

Bethany Masse, East Dixfield; Renee Blanchet, Farmington; Brad Cobb, Farmington; Kimberlie Knox, Farmington; Stacy Maxham, Farmington; Leighann Palmer, Farmington; Karen Reed, Farmington; Jessica Whitney, Industry; Lacey Dunham, Jay; Joyce Walsh, Jay; Annette Tibbetts, New Sharon; Lyndsay Beane, Phillips; Josiah Twitchell, Strong

Hancock

Eric Davis, Bucksport; Karla Glick, Bucksport; Peter Stewart, Bucksport; Wendy Martin, Dedham; Carrie Brown, Deer Isle; Rebekah Knowlton, Deer Isle; Tracilynn Morey, Deer Isle; Katherine Tardif, East Orland; Jaymee Webber, Eastbrook; Chantelle Fitzsimmons, Ellsworth; Timothy Hilton, Ellsworth; Abby Hoke, Ellsworth; Jennifer Lagasse, Ellsworth; Chelsea Salisbury, Ellsworth; Kristen Schlaefer, Ellsworth; Ashleen Sullivan, Ellsworth; Brittany Whitmore, Ellsworth; Jessica Masse, Hancock; Susan Closson, Lamoine; Nina Zeldin, Lamoine; Isabel Hopkins Keene, Northeast Harbor; Shadrach Ross, Orland; Rebecca Steele, Orland; Kendall Smith, Otis; Nadine Goodwin, Seal Cove; Lynnie Lyman, Sedgwick; Patricia Knapp, Sullivan; Derek Nicholas, Surry; Danielle Freeman, Verona Island; Kaylee Bouchard, Waltham

Kennebec

Christina Allarie, Augusta; Christeena Billings, Augusta; Chad Botting, Augusta; Sarah Brunelle, Augusta; Sean Collyer, Augusta; Courtney Cook, Augusta; Cynthia Cotnoir, Augusta; Cheryl Doucette, Augusta; Kelly Doyle, Augusta; Emily Dutton, Augusta; Kathryn Dutton, Augusta; Jon Fortin, Augusta; Courtney Frost, Augusta; Danielle Guimond, Augusta; Andrew Hathaway, Augusta; Sarah Holland, Augusta; Allison Hunt, Augusta; Michelle Lacroix, Augusta; Brittany Landry, Augusta; Anthony Lavertu, Augusta; Evan Martin, Augusta; Brianne McNally, Augusta; Diane Morin, Augusta; Jeffrey Nicknair, Augusta; Rita Pare-Peters, Augusta; Jesse Patkus, Augusta; Courtney Porter, Augusta; Tristan Power, Augusta; Amber Raye, Augusta; Kyle Smith, Augusta; Deidrah Stanchfield, Augusta; Meghan Stetson-Bartlett, Augusta; Koriana Thompson, Augusta; Faye Tibbetts, Augusta; Hue Tran, Augusta; Rebecca Day, Belgrade; Jessica Demers, Belgrade; Erin Leary, Belgrade; Natasha Moody, Benton; Audra Anderson, Chelsea; Melanie Aubuchon, Chelsea; Cassandra Beaulieu, Chelsea; Amber Rogers, Chelsea; Jilliane Johnson, Clinton; Julie Dore, Fairfield; James Vigue, Fairfield; Ann Cookson, Farmingdale; Roger Cookson, Farmingdale; Sarah Fortin, Farmingdale; Julia Kimball, Farmingdale; Marcela Lawton, Farmingdale; Jonathon Markham, Farmingdale; Lisa McClaine, Farmingdale; James Mrazik, Farmingdale; Emily Ray, Farmingdale; Andrew Thomas, Farmingdale; Brian Beavis, Gardiner; Jesse Blier, Gardiner; Michael Drashcovich, Gardiner; Ashley Gero, Gardiner; Rachael Graves, Gardiner; Danielle Seigars, Gardiner; Carlton Spotswood, Gardiner; Shelley Vermillion, Gardiner; Hillary Ware, Gardiner; Charity Williams, Gardiner; Patricia Chadwick-Robbins, Hallowell; Erica Castonguay, Litchfield; Megan McGrother, Litchfield; Kayla Smart, Litchfield; Donna Davis-Rankin, Manchester; Aaron Klajbor, Manchester; Shawna Degen, Monmouth; Ashley Goodwin, Monmouth; Samantha Remington, Monmouth; Courtney Sullivan, Monmouth; Eric Berg, Mount Vernon; Joshua Heck, Mount Vernon; Tiffany Kaplan, N Monmouth; Stephanie Palleschi, North Monmouth; Christopher Cole, Oakland; Lisa Jacunski, Oakland; Melissa Phair, Oakland; Nichole Stewart, Oakland; Jacksie Witham, Oakland; Carla Ahearn, Pittston; Torey Jones, Pittston; Dawna Gallant, Randolph; Melanie Skidgel, Randolph; Mitchell Bickford, Readfield; Megan Gasbarrone, Readfield; David Giroux, Readfield; Derek Nelson, Readfield; Katherine Voynik, Readfield; Thomas Carrothers, Rome; Samantha Marden, Sidney; Amy McKenna, Sidney; Jaime Spadea, Sidney; Sarah Basham, South China; Crystal Clark, South China; Eric Languet, South China; Bonnie Nichols, South Gardiner; Patricia Ranks, South Gardiner; Larisa Batchelder, Vassalboro; Colleen Cook, Vassalboro; Irene Lee, Vassalboro; Nicholas Roberge, Vassalboro; Ericka Roy, Vassalboro; Amy Wilson, Vassalboro; Erica Rackliff, Vienna; Julianne Bradford, Waterville; Jamar Croom, Waterville; Melissa Denis, Waterville; Ryan Donovan, Waterville; Vanessa Glazier, Waterville; Dustin Niedt, Waterville; Melissa Oprendek, Waterville; Dori Rancourt, Waterville; Tanya Evans, Wayne; Alison Lincoln-Rich, Wayne; Stephanie Love, West Gardiner; Heidi Peckham, West Gardiner; Carly Pelletier, West Gardiner; Ashley Smart, West Gardiner; Samantha Stuart, West Gardiner; Christian Zwaga, West Gardiner; Carolyn Clark, Windsor; Jody Cunningham, Windsor; Hope Edwards, Windsor; Brie-Anne Mellor, Windsor; Erin Turner, Windsor; Brenda Bolduc, Winslow; Kayla Corson, Winslow; Amanda Johnson, Winslow; Lisa Morin, Winslow; Travis Whitman, Winslow; Allison Woodside, Winslow; Jacqueline Gosselin, Winthrop; Randall Hooper, Winthrop; Kevin True, Winthrop

Knox

Wendy Byrd, Appleton; Brianna McClintock, Appleton; Cheryl Agnese, Camden; Tegan Atwell, Camden; Molly Brosnan, Camden; Sarah Duggan, Camden; Pablo Espinosa, Camden; Ashley Goff, Camden; Stephanie Griffin, Camden; Katharine Marki, Camden; Riley Peterson, Camden; Jasmin Pike, Camden; Stephanie Stiehler, Camden; Barbara Toler, Camden; John Tooley, Camden; Debra Whittier, Camden; Jacqueline Sterling, Cushing; Travis Swanson, Cushing; Brooks Crane, Hope; Stephanie Mank, Hope; Lara Smith, Hope; Rebecca Twaddel, Hope; Miranda Cousins Sternberg, Owls Head; William Kelly, Owls Head; Sean Swift, Owls Head; Olivia Cole, Rockland; Tiffany Dennison, Rockland; Kathy Estabrook, Rockland; Alexandra Grotton, Rockland; Steven Heller, Rockland; Elisabeth Kurr, Rockland; David Mills, Rockland; Suzanne Minzy, Rockland; Nathanael Morin, Rockland; Krysta Murphy, Rockland; Alice Newbert, Rockland; Christopher Nickerson, Rockland; Carol Patterson, Rockland; Amy Taylor, Rockland; Taylor Yattaw, Rockland; James Christie, Rockport; Priscilla Davis, Rockport; Julia Smith, South Thomaston; Brittany Willis, South Thomaston; Katelyn Taylor, Spruce Head; Crystal Baughman, Thomaston; Craig MacIntosh, Thomaston; Matthew Whitman, Thomaston; Jesse Poole, Vinalhaven; Naomi Aho, Warren; Susan Burnell, Warren; Terrence Costa, Warren; Mari Grover-Blum, Warren; Celena Kent, Warren; Lori Richardson, Warren; Kathryn Rose, Warren; Mikala Walton, Warren; Melody Davis, Washington; Ashlee Francis, Washington; Chandra Pitcher, West Rockport

Lincoln

Irene Parcher, Alna; Jennifer Adams, Boothbay; Rachael Sloat, Boothbay; Jason Hardwick, Boothbay Harbor; Cassandra Fabiano, Damariscotta; Candice Carrier, East Boothbay; Susan Peters, Edgecomb; John Robinson, Jefferson; Adam Simmler, Jefferson; Carrie Valentine, Somerville; Melinda Butterfield, Waldoboro; Jennifer Harvey, Waldoboro; Tasha Readinger, Waldoboro; Erica Sawyer, Waldoboro; Danica Simmons, Waldoboro; Juanita Thomas, Waldoboro; Virginia Campbell, Whitefield; Jenna Caswell, Whitefield; Ian Shaw, Whitefield

Oxford

Rebecca Hunt, Bethel; Molly MacGregor, Bethel; Debra Perry, Bethel; Jacqueline Steele, Denmark; Howard Jones, Dixfield; Ashley Hutter, Hebron; Erin Beedy, Mexico; Lisa Deherrera, Mexico; Kathrine Newton, Mexico; Suzanna Gallant, Norway; Heather Way, Norway; Dena Marsh, Otisfield; Cathleen Arsenault, Rumford; Meagan Berry, Rumford; Shawna Chase, Rumford; Courtnie Lovely, Rumford; Kristen Almeida, Sweden; Clarissa Cote, West Paris; Kendra Davis, West Paris; Misty Heath, West Paris; Erica Johnson, West Paris

Penobscot

Richard Azud, Bangor; Tanya Brown, Bangor; Cara Buttitta, Bangor; Rick Canarr, Bangor; Elisabeth Cawley, Bangor; Dustin Corey, Bangor; Kelly Gould, Bangor; Aaron Graham, Bangor; Rachel Herrin, Bangor; Barbi-Gayle Hill, Bangor; Jan Huntington, Bangor; Nicholas Mitchell, Bangor; Michelle Shepherd, Bangor; Sheila Stafford, Bangor; Kathleen Vanadia, Bangor; Danielle Gendreau, Brewer; Ryan Seymour, Brewer; Megan Young, Brewer; Brandi Cossar, Corinna; Alissa Gervais, Corinth; Diana Davis, Dexter; Matthew Forget, Dexter; Stephanie Tasker, Dexter; Karen Sylvester, Eddington; Beth Stewart, Exeter; Jennifer Atkinson, Glenburn; Alison Bailey, Hampden; Jonathan Bergman, Hampden; Renee Dobson, Hampden; Heather Hunter, Hampden; Heather MacKenzie, Hampden; Christine Doyle, Hermon; Angel Miller, Hermon; James Pettingale, Howland; Richard Sereyko, Howland; Pamela McCue, Hudson; Tanisha Stewart, Hudson; Carla Giuka, Levant; Lauren McLaughlin, Levant; Suzanna Michaud, Levant; Colleen Towers, Mattawamkeag; Cassandra Binder, Medway; Courtney Garrett, Medway; Nancy Guay, Millinocket; Trista Lovell, Newburgh; Faith Wilson, Newport; Allen Colby, Old Town; Abigail Ireland, Old Town; Kristi Murray, Old Town; Travis Gudroe, Orono; Tanya LaBelle, Orono; Ryan Eslin, Orrington; Julie Buhler, Patten; Lacey Qualey, Stacyville; Penny Sands, Stillwater; Carolyn Kirbach, Veazie; Victoria Toby, Winn

Piscataquis

Mary Watters, Brownville; Maria Wooten, Brownville Junction; Michaela Hayes, Dover Foxcroft; Jeremy Loguercio, Dover Foxcroft; Pamela Raymond, Dover Foxcroft; Brittany Robinson, Dover Foxcroft; Valerie Saunders, Dover Foxcroft; Michelle Sylvia, Guilford; Shannon Mitchell, Milo; Stephen Perkins, Sangerville

Sagadahoc

Sarah Beaulieu, Bath; Sophie Gagnon, Bath; Julie Geroux, Bath; Ashley MacArthur, Bath; Sandra Paxson, Bath; Morgan Sheafer, Bath; Julia Stires, Bath; Kenneth Walden, Bath; Shannon Lajoie, Bowdoin; Nicole Lewis, Bowdoin; Sue-Ellen Baxter, Bowdoinham; Susan Bryer, Bowdoinham; Sarah Gardella, Bowdoinham; Maegan Rice, Georgetown; Megan Fuller, Richmond; Jerry Kiesow, Richmond; Kevin Marshall, Richmond; David Craig, Topsham; Tonja Daye, Topsham; Kathleen Filtranti, Topsham; Margaret Grant, Topsham; Amanda Bernier, West Bath; Jodi Johnson, West Bath; Jessica Washburn, West Bath; Jessica Bartmess, Woolwich; Susan Beauregard, Woolwich; Danielle Namer, Woolwich; Amanda Richards, Woolwich

Somerset

Britney Holt, Cornville; Whitney Holt, Cornville; Jessica Robichaud, Fairfield; Shelly Dubois, Hartland; Darcy Michaud, Hartland; Myra Estes, Madison; Cynthia Kennard, Madison; Elizabeth Carrier, Palmyra; Abby Rust, Pittsfield; Diana Coulstring, Skowhegan; Kylie Damon, Skowhegan; Chelsae Hatfield, Skowhegan

Waldo

Zachery Bucklin, Belfast; Paula Rehlander, Belfast; Tracy Wheelden, Belfast; Emily Allen-Perry, Belmont; David Goguen, Belmont; Wanda Ferguson, Brooks; Mercedes Reynolds, Liberty; Brian Baker, Lincolnville; Thomas Carter, Montville; Christopher Beaulieu, Northport; Rebecca Lux Soc, Palermo; Jennifer Bennett, Prospect; Michele Chadwick, Searsmont; Melissa Harding, Searsmont; Lillian Bryan, Searsport; Amanda Harriman, Searsport; Roger Smith, Searsport; Timothy Wilson, Searsport; Christopher Poulin, Stockton Springs; Jennifer Pacholski, Swanville

Washington

Rebecca Fletcher, Cherryfield; Tammy Denning, Cutler; Heather Harriman, Lambert Lake; Abdul Qudus, Milbridge; Gabriel Winski, Trescott Twp

York

Renee DesRoberts, Biddeford; Joann Cope, Cornish; Rachel Leonard, Lyman; Johannah Cushing, Old Orchard Beach; Katherine Hopkins, Saco; Heather Levasseur, Saco; Erica Sawtelle, Saco; Molly Brown, South Berwick; Lacey Wakefield, Waterboro

National

Robert Miller, Anthem, AZ ,
Dawn Treude, Scottsdale, AZ
Terry Powell, Gold Canyon, AZ
Hsiu Mei Tsai, San Gabriel, CA
Christine Richardson, West Hartford, CT
Sabrina Leech, Millsboro, DE
Janette Ash, Englewood, FL
Monica Bamio-Aparicio, Hialeah, FL
Kristina Randazzo, Clearwater, FL
Julie Landi, Fort Pierce, FL
Celeste Sawyer, Winter Springs, FL
Lisa Lance, Panama City Beach, FL
Pamela Collins, Meridian, ID
Cynthia Carter, Burley, ID
Ryan Hanback, Sandwich, IL
Andrea Figaratto, Oak Bluffs, MA
Tayo Banjo, Watertown, MA
Richard Trumbull, North Brookfield, MA
Jeanette Schmidt, Durham, NC
Rebecca Ross, Goldsboro, NC
Jennifer Allen, Ossipee, NH
Ryan Gilbert, Sunapee, NH
Irina Kirilina, Brooklyn, NY
Joseph Taylor, Elyria, OH
Alexandria Smiley, Madras, OR
Erica Hons, Lock Haven, PA
Joshua Messinger, Roslyn, PA
Marianna Tremaine, Bartlett, TN
Steven Shearer, Sterling, VA

International

Melody Groves, military personnel stationed over seas

 

Full-Time Dean’s List Requirements

To qualify for the full-time Dean’s List, students must a) complete a minimum of 12 credit hours of 100-level or higher UMA coursework (exclusive of of pass/fail courses) whose semester grade point average in these courses is 3.25 or higher, with no grade below C- in any of these courses

Part-Time Dean’s List Requirements

UMA recognizes part-time students annually by naming them to a part-time Dean’s List. To qualify, students must a) complete a minimum of 12 credit hours of 100-level or higher UMA coursework (exclusive of pass/fail courses) during two consecutive semesters in an academic year (fall and spring); b) take no more than 11 credit hours of 100-level UMA coursework in either semester, and c) achieve a combined grade point average of 3.25 or higher over the two consecutive semesters, with no grades lower than C-.

For questions about the Dean’s Lists contact Ann Corbet in UMA’s Registrar’s Office at 207-621 3145 or annie@maine.edu.

17 Warren inmates earn college degrees

Penobscot Bay Pilot
WARREN — Abdi Awad is an unlikely graduate of the University of Maine at Augusta’s class of 2016. He not only had to learn the college-level course material behind the proverbial prison bars, he also had to simultaneously learn the English language. His studies were done without referencing the internet, without dedicated study times in dedicated quiet rooms, and without time off work and prison life to cram and prepare.

Full article »

Maine State Prison holds college graduation day

WGME News Channel 13
WARREN (WGME) – It was college graduation day at the Maine State Prison Wednesday. 17 inmates were awarded associates or bachelor’s degrees from the University of Maine at Augusta. Their tuitions are paid for by Ms. Doris Buffet and her Sunshine Lady Foundation. Ms. Buffet is the sister of billionaire Warren Buffet.

Full article »

University of Maine at Augusta joint statement with the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine (HHRC) about healing, hope and the way forward.

The recent tragedy in Orlando demonstrates the importance of community in all of its forms; we join together as a community to show our support for the affected parties, and reflect on the deaths of innocent people and the terrible loss to family and friends.

The community of educators and learners at the University of Maine at Augusta and the staff at the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine send messages of hope, healing and support to all those touched by this tragedy.

But we also know that this increasing pattern of tragedies cannot continue. We must not only reflect, but act. Only by educating ourselves on the issues, and standing up to say “no more” can we hope to end this all too frequent trend. Though we may disagree on the cause of such an event, America is strongest when we come together to make the world a better place.

As Abraham Lincoln said, “a house divided against itself cannot stand.” We must use this moment to unite to end these occasions of senseless violence.

Admit in a day graphicProspective students will have the opportunity to apply and be accepted to UMA right on the spot.

The University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) is hosting an, “Admit in a Day” event on Thursday, June 23rd from 1:00 — 4:00pm at the Fireplace Lounge in the Richard Randall Student Center on its Augusta Campus.

The event is an opportunity for prospective students to apply and be accepted into one of UMA’s degree programs right on the spot, which includes a wavier of the normal $40 application fee.

Prospective students will need to come to the event prepared with required paperwork including, high school or GED transcripts, college transcripts (if applicable), immunization records, 2015 federal tax forms, and W-2 forms.

Admissions counselors, financial aid experts, and academic advisors from the University will be on hand to help students apply, choose the right academic path, decide on a financial plan and get started on a course schedule.

For more information about the event, including questions about the required documentation and the admission process, please contact Enrollment Services Staff Associate Morgan Huckey at (207) 621-3075 or morgan.huckey@maine.edu.

To learn more about UMA Admissions events visit: http://www.uma.edu/admission/openhouse/

aviationUMA’s Aviation Program flight training partner, Maine Instrument Flight (MIF) will be celebrating its 70th birthday on 18th from 12:00pm to 4:00pm inside their airplane hangar located at the Augusta State Airport at 215 Winthrop Street in Augusta.

Open to the public, the event will feature MIF airplanes on display, as well as airplane rides for those interested from 1:00pm – 3:00pm, and an array of refreshments for all to enjoy. Members of the community, UMA faculty, staff and students, and MIF flight instructors and administrators are all expected to attend.

Launched in the fall of 2013 as a public-private partnership with MIF, UMA’s Aviation program is the only program of its kind in the State of Maine. It provides students with the opportunity to attain their Bachelor degree and become an FAA-certified commercial pilot under one program. This spring at its 2016 commencement ceremony, UMA graduated its very first Aviation student, Ben Rogers.

Information about UMA’s Aviation program will be available at the event, including representatives from Admissions, Enrollment Services, as well as faculty and students from the program.

Want more information about UMA’s Aviation program?

For more information about the event, contact Maine Instrument Flight.

Senior Exhibit Poter

Graduating UMA art students share their perspectives through art.

May 13- June 3, 2016
Saturday, May 14th, noon-2pm
D
anforth Gallery

UMA’s Senior Art Exhibition, Shaping Origins showcases the work of 8 graduating UMA art students from May 13th to June 3rd at the Charles Danforth Gallery. An opening reception will be held at noon on May 14th immediately following the university’s commencement ceremony.

This year’s exhibition demonstrates each artist’s transcendence of the formal elements of art through a range of concepts. These fundamentally diverse themes include video game realities, abstracted shadows, recontextualized architecture, anatomical structures, gender issues and mental chaos.

The artwork of each artist, which includes photography, printmaking, painting, mixed media, and drawing, are presented in a body of work developed throughout the year as part of their thesis projects.

The Danforth Gallery is located in Jewett Hall. Gallery hours are Monday – Thursday 9:00am – 5:00 pm, Fridays 9:00am – 2:00pm.

The exhibiting artists:

  • Miranda Lynn Dixon, from Lewiston, Maine
  • Karen Giles, from Vassalboro, Maine
  • Mike Hidalgo, from Waterville, Maine
  • Christina Lahaye, from Sidney, Maine
  • Clinton Pettengill, from Winthrop, Maine
  • Roxanne Rollins, from Augusta, Maine
  • Rachael Marie Sloat, from Boothbay, Maine
  • Jessica Smith, from Brunswick, Maine
Links:

Professor Robert KatzUMA art professor Robert Katz will leave for China this week to participate in a joint Canadian, American and Chinese academic exchange at the Jiangsu Second Normal University in Nanjing.

Katz has prepared multiple presentations that will include a discussion of his recent sculptural projects; a presentation of a film installation entitled, Were The House Still Standing: Maine Survivors and Liberators Remember the Holocaust that he created for the Michael Klahr Center, home of the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine located on the UMA campus; and a presentation of the work of his UMA art colleagues.

Jiangsu Second Normal University is much larger then UMA with a student population of about 25,000 and 17 academic departments encouraging multi-disciplinary research.

This is Katz’s second recent invitation to visit China. In 2012, he was one of seven North American artists selected to exhibit their art at an exhibition entitled, West Meets East at the prestigious Jiangsu Chinese Art Academy. During this visit he was asked to present his art at universities throughout China.

“The challenge of speaking at conferences and universities in China is that so few in the audience understand or speak English. All communication is through an interpreter. You are compelled to choose your words carefully and speak at a slower pace so that the interpretation can be accurate,” said Professor Katz.

One of Katz’s goals for his visit is to help facilitate an exchange between the art faculty at UMA and their Chinese counterparts.

Katz has taught drawing, design and sculpture classes at UMA since 1981.

On Monday May 5th a group of UMA Student Nurses from the Student Nurses Association (SNA) along with two UMA nursing faculty members traveled to Portland to volunteer to cook dinner for families staying at the Ronald McDonald House. The facility is a free resource that provides a clean and welcoming safe haven for families in crisis because of a child with a challenging medical need.

The trip was organized by SNA member, UMA commencement speaker and recent nursing graduate, Brittany Hanson, who benefited from the Ronald McDonald charity when her child was ill.

Funds to facilitate the trip were mostly raised by the SNA students themselves. In addition, one of the students, Christine Harden, was able to get four pounds of fresh haddock donated to the cause.

The group purchased food to cook on premises, as well as more than $300 worth of toys which are given to the children who stay at the Ronald McDonald House when their siblings are critically ill.

While there, they made corn chowder, haddock chowder, salads, and also brought bread and mini cupcakes for those staying at the facility at the time.

Student Nursese Volunteering Student Nursese Volunteering Student Nursese Volunteering 0509161709

Conneely at CommencementOn Saturday, May 14th at the Augusta Civic Center, the University of Maine at Augusta held its 48th Commencement Exercises. Nearly 450 students, including those who take classes at UMA’s Bangor campus, online and University College Centers throughout the entire state, received select associates and bachelor’s degrees from UMA this year.

Presiding over the Commencement exercises was UMA President James Conneely, nursing graduate Brittany Hanson was this year’s student speaker and Maine State Senator Roger Katz was the keynote.

2016 Commencement Remarks »

Commencement in the News:

UMA confers degrees on more than 400 during ceremony

Kennebec Journal/Morning Sentinel
AUGUSTA — When Kay O’Brien was growing up in Southwest Harbor, her family didn’t have enough money to send her college. After a 47-year nursing career, O’Brien is one of nearly 450 students who received degrees Saturday morning during the University of Maine at Augusta’s 48th commencement at the Augusta Civic Center.

More »

Christie receives UMA’s distinguished student award

Village Soup
Augusta — On Saturday, May 14, the University of Maine at Augusta held its 48th Commencement Exercises where graduates from UMA’s Augusta and Bangor campuses, online programs, and University College Centers across the state walked across the stage..

More »

Conneely reflects on first months on the job at UMA

Kennebec Journal/Morning Sentinel
AUGUSTA — James Conneely is focused on a reorganization and rebranding of the institution as he enters the second half of his first year as president of the University of Maine at Augusta.

More »

Four dogs spent an hour receiving affection from more than 20 people in the library as a way to relieve students’ stress related to final examinations.

By Jason Pafundi, Kennebec Journal

AUGUSTA — Dana Haskell had heard about therapy dogs but had never spent any time with one. But after more than 30 minutes of interaction with four therapy dogs in the University of Maine at Augusta library, Haskell was sold.

“I wish we could have them here every day,” said Haskell, 25, of Augusta. “I’m loving every minute of it.”

The four dogs — two Labrador retrievers and two Cavalier King Charles spaniels — spent about an hour Wednesday in the library, rolling around on the floor, drinking water and receiving affection from students, the library staff and faculty members. The dogs were brought in to help students deal with stress during finals week.

Kati Corlew, assistant professor of psychology, said she has several therapy dogs in her family and can attest to the support they can provide.

“I see a number of my students that bring therapy dogs to their classes and on campus (in Bangor),” Corlew said. “They increase relaxation and calm and help people in anxious situations.”

Corlew said the act of comforting, petting and playing with a dog stimulates the positive neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine.

“They bring out the chemicals of happiness and calm,” Corlew said as she showered Coffee the Labrador with affection. “College is stressful, and (students) who have a sweetheart like this one really benefit.”

A small area in the back corner of the library’s first floor was set up for the canine companions, complete with bowls of fresh water. Chairs were used more as a perimeter than a place to sit, because most people got on the floor with the dogs. Close to 10 students and about a dozen others took turns petting and interacting with the four four-legged friends.

Therapy dogs have been around for decades. They spend time comforting those in hospitals, schools, mental health facilities and treatment centers, and airports. Coffee, who turned 7 on Sunday, spends Friday nights at the Long Creek Youth Development Center, a South Portland facility for juvenile offenders. Coffee’s business card — yes, she is a dog with a business card — was passed out proudly by owner Olivia Rottari. The card noted Coffee likes belly rubs and treats.

Corlew said therapy dogs are helpful to college students because of how much stress the students have in their lives on a daily basis, especially those from diverse backgrounds.

“College students are in a constant state of dealing with life issues and with things happening, so a lot of times, they are always on the brink,” Corlew said. “They have really benefited from therapy dogs.”

Librarian Shiva Darbandi said because of the diverse student population, she and other library staffers thought therapy dogs would be immensely helpful.

“We knew that other university libraries have had therapy dogs come to their schools to help students de-stress,” Darbandi said. “We have veterans, nontraditional students, single moms and single dads, people who have a lot of stress in their lives in addition to the stress of finals, so they were our inspiration.”

This is the first year the library has hosted therapy dogs, and it would be a safe assumption that the dogs will be invited back in the fall. When the library staff posted the event to its social media pages, it became one of its most-mentioned and shared posts.

“We received a ton of likes and shares and followers,” Darbandi said.

Kate Burke, activities coordinator for Wagging Tails Therapy Dogs of Maine, said the main focus of a therapy dog is to make someone smile.

“We are doing such a variety of works in hospitals and schools, and reading programs (in libraries) have become very popular,” Burke said. Her two spaniels, Finnegan and Peko, received plenty of attention from Corlew, Haskell and others. The other Labrador, Cody, had just arrived with his owners from Arizona, where he spends half the year, so he was ready and willing to lay on his back to have his belly rubbed.

Haskell said she came to the library after taking a statistics final earlier in the day because she knew the dogs would be there. When told there would be another six dogs from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday at the Bennett D. Katz Library, Haskell didn’t hesitate.

“Absolutely, I’ll be here,” she said.

UMA’s Bangor campus once again welcomed the Good Shepherd Food Mobile, a mobile food pantry, for the 3rd annual “Rock The Truck” event on Tuesday, May 3rd.

Carrying 4,657 pounds of food (roughly 2.3 tons) at an estimated value of $1,325, the truck distributed fruits and vegetables, as well as meats and bread products to those in need.  An estimated 168 households, representing 470 people from 34 towns were served during the event.

Giving recognition to the need for such a service in the community, most of the food was gone in 1 hour, and a line of about 40 people had formed a half-hour before the event begun.

Nearly 20 UMA students, faculty and staff members volunteered for the event along with and people from Good Shepherd, Penquis, and Community Partnership for Protecting Children (CPPC).

The event was the most successful Rock the Truck event to date.

For more information about the event contact UMA staff member, Colleen Coffey at 207-262-7900.

Rock the Truck event

Rock the Truck event

Rock the Truck event

UMA aviation program to graduate first student on Saturday

Kennebec Journal/Morning Sentinel

AUGUSTA — Ben Rogers was on a flight to Puerto Rico a few years ago when he looked out the window and thought that flying was what he wanted to do.

“It was something I saw myself actually doing,” Rogers said during an interview at the University of Maine at Augusta, where Rogers will be the first graduate of the school’s aviation program.

MORE »

 

UMaine At Augusta’s Aviation Program Graduates First Student

WABI TV

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — The University of Maine at Augusta graduated the first student of the college’s recently established aviation program over the weekend.

The Kennebec Journal reports ( ) next year will bring the program’s first-ever graduating class, but 22-year-old Ben Rogers had the distinction of becoming the first to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in aviation from UMA on Saturday.

MORE »

Professor KellermanUMA Associate Professor of English, Robert Kellerman has been awarded a Fulbright fellowship to teach at Daugavpils University in Daugavpils, Latvia in the spring of 2017 for a semester.

A faculty member at UMA since 2006, Kellerman teaches Medieval English literature, Shakespeare, History of the English language, and intro to LGBT studies, part of UMA’s Women’s and Gender Studies minor. He recently finished a sabbatical where he completed a half dozen articles.

Kellerman underwent a tedious and rigorous process to apply for the fellowship which included the submission of a 15-page application along with various other academic documents and letters of recommendation to the country of Latvia. Representatives from the country as well as the U.S. Fulbright commission then vetted the materials before the fellowship was awarded.

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, Educational and Cultural Affairs, the teaching fellowship will give Kellerman the opportunity to travel abroad to lead master classes and seminars, take courses, visit local schools, and collaborate with other teachers internationally to share educational practices and build global competence.

Kellerman is the sixth UMA faculty member to have been awarded a Fulbright fellowship. Other faculty members have traveled to Slovenia, Ukraine, France and the Philippines on Fulbright fellowship awards. In addition, UMA hosted Fulbright fellow, Mojca Krevel from the University of Ljubljana in the spring of 2014. While at UMA, Krevel taught a course on postmodern fiction.

Erica Brown Blue Grass BandThe “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College will feature Erica Brown & The Bluegrass Connection at Jewett Hall Auditorium on Sunday, May 15, 2016, 2PM.

Erica Brown has been playing the fiddle since the age of seven and touring since she was nine.  She credits her grandfather, who played accordion and harmonica, for her passion for music.  Erica was a recipient of a 2006 Maine Arts Commission Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Award and was recognized as a Master Artist by the Maine Arts Commission that same year.  Don Roy, under whom she was an apprentice, said, “For the music of her heritage and her age, there’s no one any better.”  She has competed in and won numerous fiddle contests throughout New England and Canada.  Erica combines her classical training on the violin with the spontaneity of country and bluegrass fiddle for a fun-filled performance.

Erica Brown’s band The Bluegrass Connection is composed of Steve Roy, Matt Shipman, Ken Taylor, and Read McNamara playing guitar, bass, mandolin and banjo, with Erica Brown on fiddle.

Tickets are $10, students $5, 12 & under free.  Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop  and at the door.  UMA students may receive free tickets from the Student Life Office.  Call 621-3551, or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or for mail order tickets.

Website: www.concertsatjewett.com

UC Student Emma Banks

UC Student Emma Banks

University College (UC) Student Emma Banks was Chosen as the Maine Public Policy Scholar from UMA
She will Study Maine’s High School Equivalency Test

Do students seeking their high school equivalency certificate who are from rural Maine communities have adequate support?  Is Maine’s high school equivalency examination fair? These and a variety of related questions will be examined by Emma-Marie Banks, a resident of Parsonsfield, during her year as a Maine Public Policy Scholar.

One student from each of the System’s seven campuses is chosen to work with a faculty advisor to address a real-life policy issue currently facing Maine.

Banks was recently named the 2016 Maine Public Policy Scholar from the University of Maine at Augusta (UMA).

Public Policy, Comprehensive Service

A UMA social sciences major with a behavioral sciences minor, Banks pursues her bachelor’s degree online and at a distance through University College, which offers over 100 degree and certificate programs administered by its eight Centers in communities across Maine. She was chosen to be UMA’s Maine Public Policy Scholar from a pool of diverse applicant proposals.

The successful proposal that Banks submitted was evaluated by two UMA faculty members, James Cook, an Assistant Professor of Social Sciences, and Lorien Taylor Lake-Corral, Assistant Professor of Social Sciences.

Now in his third year as UMA’s faculty advisor to the Maine Public Policy Scholar program, Cook will guide Banks and hopes that her recommendations will ultimately influence policymakers.  She will begin her work in May, when the 2015 Maine Policy Scholar from UMA graduates.

“The Maine Policy Scholars Program is an opportunity to connect with Maine policymakers, and act as a bridge to a number of rewarding and influential careers in public policy, advocacy, activism and leadership,” noted Cook.

As a resident of a rural Maine community, Banks knows the special challenges that distance can pose.  Banks will evaluate the HiSET test in Maine and identify ways to improve it.  HiSET is Maine’s version of the General Educational Development (GED) high school diploma equivalency test.  Maine adopted the HiSET test in January 2014, contracting with Educational Testing Services to provide its high school equivalency test.

“Emma Banks’ proposal showed intellectual depth, timeliness, and the ability to connect strong academic skills to the resolution of real problems affecting Mainers,” Cook said.

In her application letter, Banks characterized herself as an online student who is passionate about education, especially adult education and high school certificate programs.
Banks serves as a tutor for the University College virtual online academic writing lab, known as VAWLT, which bills itself as a learning resource for today’s distance learners and educators.

“Working as a course embedded writing mentor and tutor through UMA, I have seen how computer mediated communication can play an important role in education,” Banks wrote in her application letter.  She raised the question of whether Maine’s adult education centers would benefit from an expansion into online based services for geographically and / or economically disadvantaged students.

Scholarship, Service and Commitment

The level of scholarship, skill, and ability to address complex issues that Banks displays on a daily basis has impressed her professors and supervisors.

“VAWLT has been a stepping stone for Emma,” noted Michelle Lisi, Coordinator of UC VAWLT.  “Whenever I encourage her to take a step, she’s ready for it.”

Lisi says that Banks is self-directed and able to pace herself.

“She’s really become more like an Assistant Coordinator to the writing lab than a tutor,” Lisi said.  “She demonstrates an exceptional capacity for leadership.  She is a peer leader and role model for her fellow students.”

Banks sees great potential for the expansion of online education to level the playing field between rural and urban or suburban students in Maine.

“I have seen the expansion of online educational resources and support for higher education and K through 12, but I have yet to see that level of support for adult education and high school equivalency examinations,” Banks said.  “The high school equivalency tests require tutoring to even qualify to take the exam.  This is a hurdle for some students.”

The scope and diversity of her policy research will be extensive.

“This project will involve research and interviews in the adult education field to find out what types of support are currently available, and to determine how this support could be expanded or improved,” Banks explained.  “I would like to determine if expanding adult education service into the online world or computer mediated communication would be beneficial to these adult learners and the staff that tutor them.”

A 2009 graduate of Sacopee Valley High School, Banks is passionate about education and the role that technology may play in improving access to resources.

“I think that computer mediated communication is an underutilized tool in education,” Banks stated.  “Its implementation in the adult education world could be life-changing for many people.  Maine’s population is dispersed across a large geographic area, so exploring options that allow learners to connect with resources that allow them to gain access to educational resources at a distance is invaluable.”
Online Education: An Important Resource for Maine

As a University College student Banks has seen firsthand how transformative an experience that access to well-designed and administered online courses can be.

“I have seen how computer mediated education can open up a whole new world to people who otherwise would not be able to even consider the idea of obtaining a higher education,” Banks said.  “I would be incapable of attending college in my current place in life right now if it were not for the online option.  I would love to see this availability expanded into adult education and high school completion.”

The level of scholarship, focus on improving access to educational resources, and drive to learn that Banks has demonstrated has impressed faculty and staff.

Cook feels that Banks’ achievement reflects well upon the University of Maine at Augusta’s learning community.

“This shows that students at the University of Maine at Augusta are actively engaged not only in their own education, but with the welfare of the public education system in Maine,” Cook stated.  “Emma is demonstrating just one way in which a University of Maine at Augusta Education represents a return on investment.  That return accrues not just to the student, but to the benefit of communities across Maine.”

University College: Online, Affordable and Local

Online, affordable and supported by eight local Centers across Maine, University College allows students – traditional, adult, and those returning to complete their degree – access to over 100 certificate and degree programs from the University of Maine System.  Students access the resources of campuses while studying online, at their local Center, or pursuing a mix of online and traditional classroom instruction while staying close to home.

University College is located on the UMA campus, and operates Centers at Bath / Brunswick, East Millinocket, Ellsworth, Houlton, Norway / South Paris, Rockland, Rumford / Mexico, and Saco.

University College offers financial support to students with programs such as the Adult Degree Completion Scholarship, in addition to providing comprehensive advising services.  It is online at learn.maine.edu.

AUGUSTA, Maine – University of Maine at Augusta senior basketball star Brandon Rogers will continue his basketball career, as the California native signed a contract Friday afternoon to play for the University of Essex Blades development team for the 2016-17 season. Rogers will pursue his graduate degree and work towards a professional basketball career while overseas.

Rogers (Turlock, Calif.), a 6’5 center, arrived at UMA as a sophomore and put together three outstanding seasons for head coach Jim Ford, leaving the Moose as a member of the 1,000 point, 1,000 rebound club. He is the first UMA basketball player to continue his career overseas.

“Brandon’s athleticism has grown as high above the rim as he can sore making him a serious candidate for European Professional basketball,” Ford said. “The Master’s program opportunity at Essex University will allow his outstanding leadership to flourish with their program and provide Brandon the opportunity to showcase his basketball abilities.”

The University of Essex specializes in supporting and developing performance athletes, and Rogers will pursue his masters degree in Health Research with the university and then travel on weekends with the Blades and work on continuing his development as a basketball player.

The Blades are a part of the National Basketball Development League which plays games from September to April traveling as far away as Lithuania. Rogers’ goal at the end of one year is to move into the professional ranks overseas.

RigersSigning

Register Here »

(Registration Required)

April 29, 2016
9:00 AM – 4:30 PM

Augusta campus Fireplace Lounge
Bangor campus Eastport 124
Online via Google Hangout

The UMA Interdisciplinary Student Conference includes a variety of presentations, activities, displays, and events on April 29, 2016 from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM. The conference will take place physically in Augusta and Bangor, connected through two Google Hangouts that are also open for distance students’ attendance. Posters will also be on display in both campus locations, and internet spaces including Facebook and Twitter will also display students’ work. More info below.

While all students, faculty, staff, and community members are free to attend all or part of the conference, please register through this link to help us plan for food and space.

How to Connect:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AMEWGSstudies
Twitter Live Tweet: #UMAINT
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/653715958003733/?ref=bookmarks
Google Hangout 1: Fireplace Lounge and Eastport 124 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmwB3WdQbG8
Google Hangout 2: Randall 218 and Eastport 139 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDJ75PLpB2w
2016 INT Conference Website: https://umaint.wordpress.com/
Links to electronic posters and spaces: https://umaint.wordpress.com/electronic-poster-interdisciplinary-connections-in-social-media-spaces/
7:00 PM Jazz Concert Live Stream: https://maine.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=fe9935bf-7d8d-4d2b-9990-b0d06020f789

Posters on Display All Day

Augusta, Fireplace Lounge
Kenneth Walden, Teaching of the Humanities and Social Sciences
Donna Davis-Rankin, The Use of Integrative Modalities to Enhance the Quality of Life for Breast Cancer Patients
Asst. Prof. Sharon McMahon Sawyer and Sarah Gardella JUS ’16, Justice in Cuba
Rachel Palmer, State of Family Therapy for Veteran Families
Megan Forbes, Advocacy and Oil Spill Reporting
Karen Twidwell, Xenoestrogens Cause Breast Cancer: Nurse Advocacy and Education
Masha LaChance, Pattern of Fluorescence in the Huntington’s Disease
SGA, New Orleans Service Trip
Aging Onward, group poster

Bangor, Eastport 124
WGS 101: Praxis Projects from Soup and Substance
Habitat For Humanity
Rachael Doane, Current Therapies for OIF and OEF Veterans and Their Families After Reentry

Electronic Posters and Student Work on Display
AME/WGS 305 and WGS 101: Interdisciplinary Connections in Social Media Spaces
New Orleans Service Trip
Interdisciplinary Colloquium Tour

The Student INT Conference is sponsored by the Student Government Association (Augusta and Bangor), The UMA Honors Program, Nottage Library, We ARE Maine Presidential Mini-grant, Nicole’s grant; Conference Planning Committee members are, Kati Corlew and Sarah Hentges, co-chairs, and Nicole Caruso, James Cook, Amber Howard, Anita Jerosch, Robert Kellerman, Lorien Lake-Corral, Sharon McMahon Sawyer, Brad O’Brien, Elizabeth Powers, Jennifer Stano, Ben Treat

2016 INT Conference Schedule

View the Schedule

8:30 – 9:00 AM: Registration/check-in/refreshments

9:00 – 9:10 AM: Welcome remarks from Dean Greg Fahy

Fireplace Lounge (Augusta), Eastport 124 (Bangor) via Google Hangout 1

9:15 to 10:15: Morning Session I:

Politics, Justice, & Group Dynamics

Fireplace Lounge (Augusta) & Eastport 124 (Bangor), Google Hangout 1
Moderator: James Cook, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Paul Cote – Tribal-State Relations
Lian Oyerbides – Intersections of Justice, Social Services, and Mental Health.
Jason Palmer and Sarah Lemieuz – Political Campaigns
Dan Ouellette – Interdisciplinary Measures & Designs for Group Dynamics
Rebeccah T. Smith, Belfast Re-Entry Center: Turning Lives Around

A variety of approaches reveal the limitations and possibilities of our political systems and structures.  Politics is a variably inclusive effort to answer the collective question, what shall we do?  The answer to that question relies on still further questions. Who is represented, and by whom?  Who has voice and which voices are not heard?  How are political messages shaped by forces of partisanship and identity?  Finally, outside the realm of formal politics, how do social forces shape the decision-making of informal groups?  Presenters on this panel confront these questions with one eye on theory about the political world and another eye on observation of the political world.

Tutoring & Writing

Randall 218 (Augusta) and Eastport 139 (Bangor), Google Hangout 2
Moderator: Elizabeth Powers, Assistant Professor of English

Kim Carter – Write On!
Ann Cookson – Helping Students Alleviate Writing Anxiety
Emma Banks – The Role of a Course Embedded Virtual Writing Mentor and the Importance of Access to Virtual Resources for Distance Learners

How does writing change across contexts? What role do tutors play in supporting writers across the disciplines? In this session, three writing consultants reflect on experiences and share research projects that explore answers to these questions.

10:30-11:30 AM: Morning Session II

Identity, Intersectionality, and Social Media

139 Eastport (Bangor) & Randall 218 (Augusta), Google Hangout 2
Moderator: Sarah Hentges, Associate Professor of American Studies

Carly Cloukey – Who is She?
Jessica Bishop – The Personal Is Still Political
Lisa Tissari – Intersectionality: Solutions for Assimilation
Jason Palmer – Social Media and Happiness

Intersectionality asks that we consider race, class, gender, and sexuality as well as power and politics. Women’s and Gender Studies and Social Media are spaces where we might find empowerment… and maybe even happiness.

Health & Aging

Fireplace Lounge (Augusta) & Eastport 124 (Bangor), Google Hangout 1
Moderator: Amber Howard, Assistant Professor of Biology

Ellen Stoops – FOXO Regulation and the Resulting Impact on Lifespan for Many Different Species
Jamie Kemper – A Cavity in Maine’s Elderly Dental Care.
Chris Enman – Influence of Cigarette Advertisements in America
Karl F.W. Hance – The Effectiveness of Atheism and the Twelve Steps

Is health determined by genetics or behavior? This panel merges science, healthcare issues, advertising, and religion to discuss how our biological make-up, personal choices, and beliefs shape our lives and well being.

11:45 AM – 1:00 AM: Lunch & Keynote Speaker

Chris Scovel, Director MASS Design Group Ltd.
Introduced by Eric Stark, Professor of Architecture

Augusta, Live in Fireplace Lounge (Panera Bread), and Bangor (What’s the Scoop?), Eastport 124 via Google Hangout 1

MASS Design Group, Ltd’s “big idea”: “We design, build and advocate for better buildings, and empower the people who build them.” Chris joined MASS in 2011 and has worked on multiple projects in East and West Africa, India, Haiti and the US. He has lead design teams for new large hospital complexes, new hospital buildings, and renovations. He notes, “That architecture is a service profession need not be limiting. At MASS service is proactive and ambitious, and reaches out broadly beyond our buildings.  MASS serves those who serve others, and expands their impact in the process.”

1:15-2:15 PM: Afternoon Session I

SGA, Interdisciplinary Leadership Roundtable

Randall 218 (Augusta) and 139 Eastport (Bangor), Google Hangout 2
Moderator: Kimberly Carter, Vice-President Augusta Student Government Association
Anthony Guimond, Activities Coordinator; Roger Mackbach, President; Carmen Bragg, Executive Secretary; Patrick Caskin, Public Relations Coordinator

Leadership requires an understanding of people and ideas that cross many different disciplines. Students consider what interdisciplinary leadership looks like and how it can help us build a better student leadership structure at UMA.

The INT Colloquium Student Roundtable/Discussion

Fireplace Lounge (Augusta) and 124 Eastport (Bangor), Google Hangout 1
Moderator: Brad O’Brien, Student Representative to the Board of Trustees
Lian Oyerbides, Carly Cloukey, Kevin Martin, Sierra Scott, Jackie Estrella, Scott Hosier, Betsy Smith, Hannah Priest, Deena Staples

This semester students have heard from more than 20 faculty members about their research and teaching, ranging across almost all of UMA’s programs. From the interdisciplinarity of disciplines to the power of therapies, disaster, texts, yoga, science, music, art and more, we’ll discuss what we have learned about interdisciplinarity and why it is so important for education–at UMA and beyond.

2:30-3:30 PM: Afternoon Session II

Cuba Culture + Change

Randall 218 (Augusta) and 139 Eastport (Bangor), Google Hangout 2

Moderator, Sharon McMahon Sawyer, Assistant Professor of Justice Studies
Margaret Grant, Meghan Stanwood-Schultz, Eli Trask.

Cuba is a country of great contrast.  Cuba is a place where few Americans have gone in the past fifty years.  UMA students will talk about Cuba Culture + Change and what they learned about Cuba and its people based on their research and experiences.

Engaging Allies Across Disciplines

Fireplace Lounge (Augusta) and 124 Eastport (Bangor), Google Hangout 1
Moderators: Kevin Martin, Coordinator of Civic Engagement UMA Honors Program, and Kati Corlew, Assistant Professor of Psychology

We ARE Maine Students
Jeremy Tannis
Alicia Bessey
Jessica Bishop

We are students, but we are also community members and activists. Students talk about their Maine Wabanaki REACH and Safe Zone training experiences as well as the civic engagement work that they participate in–in and out of the classroom. What does it mean to be an ally? How can interdisciplinarity help us change our world for the better?

3:30 – 4:30 PM: Closing Reception

Fireplace Lounge  and 124 Eastport, Google hangout 1
Closing Remarks: Roger Mackbach, President Augusta Student Government Association

  • We ARE Maine Certificates
  • Live Tweet Award #UMAINT
  • Most Sessions Attended Award
  • Bangor and Augusta Outstanding Contribution Award
  • Open Mic

7:00 PM: Jazz Student Concert

Jewett Auditorium Live
Live Link: https://maine.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=fe9935bf-7d8d-4d2b-9990-b0d06020f789

Envok – A student vocal ensemble offering a mixture of jazz, pop, gospel and maybe even a madrigal.

On Saturday, May 14th at 10:00 AM at the Augusta Civic Center, the University of Maine at Augusta will hold its 48th Commencement Exercises.

Graduates from UMA’s Augusta and Bangor campuses, online programs, and University College Centers across the state will walk across the stage to receive associate and baccalaureate degrees from UMA during the event.

This year’s keynote speaker is state Senator Roger Katz. Serving his third term in the Maine State Senate, he represents the people of Augusta, China, Oakland, Sidney, and Vassalboro. He also served as Mayor of Augusta for two terms. Along with his numerous legislative achievements, Senator Katz has long been active in his community, serving on many local boards and committees including United Way, Kennebec Valley YMCA, Augusta Charter Commission, and Augusta Development Corporation to name a few. In addition, as former President of the Maine Trial Lawyers Association he was named one of the most “Outstanding Lawyers in America.” Senator Katz resides in Augusta with his wife Birdie Newman Katz.

During the event, Regina Anderson Northouse, a 2003 graduate of UMA and current Executive Director of Food Recovery Network will receive the Distinguished Alumni Award, and graduates Donna Davis-Rankin of Manchester, Maine and James Christie of Rockport, Maine will both be receiving a Distinguished Student Award.

In addition, UMA Professor Emeritus Barry M. Farber will receive an honorary degree, and recently retired UMA faculty members, Sheila Bennett, Jill Rubinson, and Grace Leonard will be all awarded the distinguished ranking of UMA Professor Emerita.

For more information about this year’s commencement ceremony visit: http://www.uma.edu/about/commencement/

 

spring 2016 Jazz Week poster

The University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) will host, “Jazz (and more) Week” on Wednesday, April 27th, Thursday, April 28th, Friday 29th, and Sunday, May 1st (no performances on Saturday, April 30th) at Jewett Hall Auditorium on UMA’s Augusta campus beginning at 7:00pm Wednesday through Thursday, and at 5:00pm on Sunday.

The bi-annual Jazz (and more) week concerts feature both student and faculty performers from UMA’s Jazz and Contemporary Music Program and represent the semester culmination of student work.

Admission to all UMA Jazz (and more) Week concerts is free. No tickets or reservations are required.

To view live stream of Jazz (and more) Week, just click that day’s “Live Stream” link during the performances.

For further information please call (207) 621-3286.

Schedule for 2016 Spring Jazz (and more) Week

  • Wednesday, April 27, 7:00pm: Jazz On Tour
    Live Stream

    • Zack Pomerleau (drums) of Auburn
    • Connor Reeves (bass) of Hallowell
    • Evan Gilbert (guitar) of Saco
    • Lee MacDowell (guitar) of Augusta
    • Jennifer Snowman (alto/tenor/flute) Canaan
    • Director Steve Grover
  • Thursday, April 28, 7:00 pm: The Jazzmanian Trebles & Progressive Rock Ensemble
    Live Stream
  • Jazz Ensemble Group:
    • Kyle Melcher (drums) of Livermore Falls
    • Jonathan Lawrence (bass) of Readfield
    • Dan Pozner (guitar) of Canaan, MA
    • Eli Trask (trumpet) of Hallowell
    • Director Pamela Jenkins
  • Progressive Rock Group:
    • Paul Migliaccio (guitar) of Gardiner
    • Olin Moody (guitar) of Windsor
    • Malcolm Holteen (guitar) of Augusta
    • Nicholas Lewis (bass) Manchester
    • Director Scott Hughes
  • Friday, April 29, 7:00 pm: Envok (Jazz Vocal Ensemble)
    Live Stream

    • Maleah Chadwick (sop/alt) of Searsmont
    • Molly Worthley (sop/alt) of Vassalboro
    • Brian Thomas (baritone) of Bowdoinham
    • Cam MacMillian (baritone) of Winthrop
    • Director Marcia Gallagher
  • Sunday, May 1, 5:00 pm: Senior Recital (Bass)
    Live Stream

    • Adam Frederic (bass)
    • Gideon Forbes (tenor sax)
    • Emma Stanley (trumpet)
    • Emmett Harrity (piano)
    • Chris Sweet (drums)

The “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College will feature the DaPonte String Quartet at Jewett Hall Auditorium on Sunday, April 17, 2017, 2PM.  There will be a pre-concert talk at 1PM.

The DaPonte String Quartet, comprised of Lydia Forbes and Ferdinand Liva on violin, Kirsten Monke on viola, and Myles Jordan on cello, was voted “best musical group” in Maine (in all music genres) for 2014 by readers of Down East Magazine.  They were recently named the 2016 Maine Arts Commission Fellows in Performing Arts.

The Quartet now plays over 70 concerts a year across Maine in addition to performing and teaching all over the United States and around the world.   Its repertoire spans the entire history of music.  The DaPonte String Quartet is now in its 24th season.

Tickets are $10, students $5, 12 & under free.  Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop  and at the door.  Call 621-3551, or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or for mail order tickets.

Website: www.concertsatjewett.com

The next concert is Sunday, May 15, 2016, 2PM – Erica Brown & The Bluegrass Connection

UMA Students_HabitatForHumanity

UMA students spent their spring break last week volunteering with Habitat for Humanity of Greater Bangor as part of an “Alternative Spring Break” trip the University does annually.

During the week, students did demolition work on the interior of a home, installed rigid foam insulation, tyvek, and strapping to the exterior of the home and also participated in any clean-up work needed on site.

Seen in the image left to right are UMA students Jason Ludden of Lee and Carly Jana McDorr of Bath, UMA Bangor staff member Nicole Caruso, UMA students Sierra Sirois of Leeds and Samantha Townsend of Limington, UMA Bangor Faculty member Kati Corlew, and friends of UMA, Cynthia and Heather O’Malley.

A group of UMA Students, faculty and staff traveled to Cuba last week as part a 6 credit travel course called, “Cuba: Culture + Change.” During the trip students had the opportunity to visit historic sites and experience cuban culture. While there, they also made a point to follow the historic footsteps of the Obamas who had traveled to the country the week before.

UMA Students visit Cuba

Back row, L-R: Abel, the tour guide; Susan Page; Steve Heddericg, Carol-Lynn Rossel, Pat Clark, Connie Holden, Peg Grant, Annie Withington, Meghan Schultz, Eli Trask, Sarah Gardella, Maleah Chadwick, Chad Welch, Steve Corral, Julia Stires, Joan Kelly, Sharon Sawyer Front row, L-R: Lorien Lake-Corral, Laurie Krzywda, Ruby Rodgers

The University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) will hold a Transfer Day information session specifically geared toward students interested in transferring UMA on Friday, April 22nd from 10:00am – 1:00pm at the Richard Randall Student Center located on its Augusta campus.

The information session is being held to give prospective students the opportunity to learn how they can apply their previously earned credits and work experience toward select programs at UMA.

During the event, prospective students will have the opportunity to talk one on one with UMA staff from its offices of Financial Services, Admissions, Veterans Affairs, Learning Support, Portfolio & Career Services as well as Student Life and Athletics. Attendees will also have the opportunity to do a transcript evaluation on the spot, have a tour of the Augusta campus, and participate in a give-away for a free UMA course.

UMA has many exciting programs to choose from including a Bachelor of Science in Applied Science which is specifically designed for Maine Community College transfers, as well as an RN-BSN Nursing Completion Degree, a Bachelor of Science in Aviation, a new Bachelor of Science in Veterinary Technology, and many more. To see a complete list of UMA’s academic programs visit: http://www.uma.edu/academics/programs/

For more information and to register for Transfer Day visit: http://www.uma.edu/admission/transfer-day or contact Kathy Trask at (207) 621-3140 or trask@maine.edu.

Nine UMA students spent their spring break volunteering at the Real Hope for Haiti’s Center for Malnourished Children last week. Since this was the UMA Biology program’s 6th service trip to Casale, Haiti, they went prepared with 1000 pounds of donations including medical supplies, school supplies, clothing, pillowcase dresses made by 3 local churches, layette kits, birthing kits, backpacks with school supplies, gift bags for 160 kids, soccer balls (donated by Kents Hill School), shoes, vitamins, and more!

UMA Students in Haiti

Back row (top):  Mellissa Arroyo, Sarah Coughlin
Middle row:  Patrick Caskin, Emily Karter, Jamie Plummer, Allison Woodside
First Row (bottom):  Susan Baker (faculty member), Masha LaChance, Jessica Rodrigue, Tiffany Labbe, Michel Pierre Louis (interpreter)

Student Art Show PosterThe UMA Danforth Gallery is displaying the juried artwork of UMA students from the art program in the, 2016 UMA Juried Art Student Exhibition through April 22. There will be a reception and awards ceremony on Sunday, April 10th from 2:00pm – 4:00pm. The reception and exhibit are free and open to the public.

Honorary Jurors Jesse Potts, a multidisciplinary artist and Assistant Professor of Art at the University of Maine at Farmington and Susan Smith, an associate faculty member in the Intermedia MFA program of the University of Maine, Orono, were tasked with selecting the most carefully crafted, and thoughtfully developed and designed pieces submitted by students for the exhibit.

The selected collection represents a broad range of media and topics, including photography, printmaking, painting, drawing, sculpture, electronic arts, graphic novel, and other mixed media. The artwork, completed as part of coursework throughout the past year, showcases students at all stages in their academic development.

The UMA Art Program offers a bachelors degree in studio art with concentrations in drawing, painting, sculpture, graphic design, printmaking, electronic arts, and photography.

The Danforth Gallery, located in Jewett Hall on the University of Maine at Augusta flagship campus in Augusta, is open Monday through Thursday from 9am to 5pm, and on Fridays from 9am to 3pm.

For more information about the exhibit or the program contact Associate Professor Robert Rainey, director of the Danforth Gallery: robert.rainey@maine.edu

 

Richard Blanco to Headline Free Poetry Festival at UMA

The University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) will hold its 14th annual Terry Plunkett Maine Poetry Festival starting on Friday, April 8th from 5:00pm – 9:00pm and continuing on Saturday, April 9th from 10:00am – 5:00pm on UMA’s Augusta campus. This year’s keynote is the beloved and influential poet Richard Blanco.

Richard Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history, he is the youngest, first Latino, immigrant, and gay person to serve in such a role. Born in Madrid to Cuban exiled parents and raised in Miami, the negotiation of cultural identity and place characterize his body of work.

Blanco’s many honors include the Agnes Starrett Poetry Prize, the Beyond Margins Award from the PEN American Center, the Paterson Poetry Prize, a Lambda Literary Award, and two Maine Literary Awards. He has been featured on CBS Sunday Morning and NPR’s Fresh Air. He has been a Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow and received honorary doctorates from Macalester College, Colby College, and the University of Rhode Island. He has continued to write occasional poems for organizations and events. He currently shares his time between Bethel, ME and Boston, MA.

Other festival activities include a performance by Brio (formerly members of Improvox), local student poetry award announcements (both high school and college level), a panel discussion about Richard Blanco’s poetry, memoir, and integrated themes, readings by local poets and students, as well as a musical performance by UMA Jazz Students. Detailed schedule below.

The Terry Plunkett Maine Poetry Festival, held in April each year to honor the memory of Terry Plunkett, a former English professor at UMA, encompasses diverse Maine voices: young and old, emerging writers and those who are well published. The festival is free and open to the public.

2016 Schedule:

Friday, April 8
Richard Randall Student Center, Klahr Center

11:00am – 5:00pm – UMA English Conference from
2:00 – 4:45pm – High School Teacher Workshops: Poetry and Pedagogy
4:45 – 5:30pm – Soup, sandwiches, salad in Fireplace Lounge
5:30pm – Welcoming Remarks and Introduction
5:40pm – Student Awards for High School Contests, UMS student poets, introduced by John McLaughlin
6:00pm – Poet Chris Farrell and painter Heléne Farrar
6:15 pm – Poetry Out Loud Student Winners, introduced by Ellen Taylor
6:30pm – Sampler of Maine Poets, introduced by Ellen Taylor (Marita O’Neill, Dawn Potter, Martin Steingesser)
7:15 – 8:00pm – Brio (formerly members of Improvox)
8:00 – 9:00pm – Reception Klahr Center

Saturday April 9
Richard Randall Student Center Fireside Lounge (upstairs)

10:00 – 11:00am – Poet Robin Merrill, with dancers Genevieve and Skyla Burgess, Poet Ellen Taylor, with songwriter Paddy Mills, UMA Art students visualization of Blanco Poems (Google Slide Show), introduced by Robert Rainey
11:10am – 12:30om –  Panel on Richard Blanco’s poetry, memoir, or integrated themes
12:30 – 1:30pm –  Lunch for all

Jewett Hall Auditorium

1:30 – 2:00pm – Music by UMA Jazz Students, Jared Wilkinson and Friends
2:00 – 3:00pm – Reading with Richard Blanco, followed by question and answer session, book signing
Closing Reception with music by UMA Jazz group, Jared Wilkinson and Friends

The University of Maine at Augusta is offering a free interactive teaching workshop led by Maine Poets, Dawn Potter and Martin Steingesser on Friday, April 8th in UMA’s Richard Randall Student Center from 2:00pm – 5:00pm.

One part of the workshop will focus on how classroom teachers can use poetry to teach language-arts skills while also facilitating students’ creative civil engagement. The other part will focus on writing strategies and participants will be encouraged to explore voice in their writing and the pleasures of speaking, hearing and sharing poems.

The workshop will take place in conjunction with the University’s Terry Plunkett Poetry Festival, which starts immediately following the workshop on the evening of April 8th and will conclude on Saturday, April 9th. An annual tradition at UMA, the festival is one of the largest poetry festivals in the state. This year’s keynote is the beloved and influential poet Richard Blanco. More information about the festival is forthcoming.

Register for the workshop here, or for more information contact UMA Professor of English, Ellen Taylor at ellen.taylor@maine.edu.

The “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College will feature the DaPonte String Quartet at Jewett Hall Auditorium on Sunday, April 17, 2017, 2PM. There will be a pre-concert talk at 1PM.

The DaPonte String Quartet, comprised of Lydia Forbes and Ferdinand Liva on violin, Kirsten Monke on viola, and Myles Jordan on cello, was voted “best musical group” in Maine (in all music genres) for 2014 by readers of Down East Magazine. They were recently named the 2016 Maine Arts Commission Fellows in Performing Arts.

The Quartet now plays over 70 concerts a year across Maine in addition to performing and teaching all over the United States and around the world.   Its repertoire spans the entire history of music. The DaPonte String Quartet is now in its 24th season.

Tickets are $10, students $5, 12 & under free. Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop and at the door. Call 621-3551, or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or for mail order tickets.

University of Maine at Augusta Senior College (UMASC) and UMA College of Arts and Sciences will bring together a panel of women who hold prominent positions in the State of Maine for a special Forum on the Future on Sunday, April 3rd at 2:00PM in Jewett Auditorium.

The featured speakers are Terry Hayes, Maine State Treasurer, Gilda Nardone, Executive Director of New Ventures Maine, and Lori Parham, Maine State Director of AARP.

Coming from varied backgrounds, the presenters have in common a history of supporting women in both leadership and career development. They will tell of their efforts to obtain a good education and to gain the experience which has made them highly qualified for the roles they now perform. They will talk about what they have learned, how they have charted their careers, how they have dealt with gender bias and how they have balanced work and family.

Moderating the panel and representing the UMASC Committee on Forum on the Future will be Marilyn Canavan. Now retired, she represented Waterville in the Maine legislature for eight years and was Director of Maine’s Commission on Government Ethics and Election Practices for ten years.

During the forum there will be ample opportunity for members of the audience to comment and ask questions of the panelists.

The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

More about the speakers:

Terry Hayes heads an office which guides the finances of state agencies and provides them with efficient banking services. Incidentally this agency seeks to find the rightful owners of over $200 million in assets now in the keeping of the Treasurer. One of Hayes’ goals is to track and make more transparent how bond money in Maine is spent. Now a political independent, she was nominated by the joint Republican caucus and elected by a bipartisan majority of the 127th Legislature to be Maine’s first independent State Treasurer. From 2006 to 2014 she represented Oxford County in the House of Representatives as a Democrat and was Assistant Minority Leader from 2010-2012. She served for six years on the Joint Standing Committee on State and Local Government. She was a field organizer for Eliot Cutler’s independent bid for governor in 2014.

Gilda Nardone founded the Maine Displaced Homemakers’ Program in 1978. The name of the organization was later changed to Maine Centers for Women, Work, and Community and then, in 2016, it became New Ventures Maine. Despite its changes in name, the mission of her organization has remained the same, that of training and coaching women in career planning, helping them to hone their business skills and to develop their leadership abilities. In 1993, Nardone was inducted into the Maine Women’s Hall of Fame. In 2008 she was named Women in Business Champion for Maine and New England by the Small Business Administration.

Lori Parham has been Maine’s Director of AARP since February of 2012. In that office she is the lead advocate and spokesperson for AARP – and thus for most older people in Maine. Prior to moving to Maine she was an interim Vice President of AARP in Washington D.C. She previously served as a leader in the Florida Office AARP, as Advocacy Manager of State Affairs and as State Director. She is currently a board member of Avesta Housing and of the Portland-based Independent Transportation Network. She is also a commissioner on the Maine Commission for Community Service.

Maine Science Festival LogoAnita Jerosch, Assistant Professor of Music, and William Whitener, UMA Applied Trumpet Instructor, will present a lecture at the Maine Science Festival on March 18th at the Cross Center in Bangor; The music synthesizer: “Old School” audio.

In this presentation, Anita will explore and demonstrate the conch shell as a signal instrument with a narrow range of volume and expression ( but a lot of practical application!) to the bass trombone with a wide range of volume and expression.. Bill will demonstrate the physics of music ; what is a trumpet? A tube.  We will perform on garden hoses, funnels, sea shells, hollowed tree branches and antelope horns as well as modern brass instruments. All are welcome to attend this display of audio expression with visual representation of sound waves and how music affects the brain (and has saved civilizations!) .Anita and Bill will be joined by members of the Bangor Symphony Orchestra brass section.

UMA’s men and women’s basketball teams have ended the 2016 season with success and honors. We would like to congratulate the student athletes who work tirelessly throughout the season, not only as basketball players but also as full-time students in excellent academic standing. Congratulations as well to the athletic department staff who spend countless hours planning, and attending practices and games, and to the dedicated fans for their encouragement and support.

Here are the highlights of this very successful season.

The men’s basketball team had one of the most successful seasons in recent history culminating with a number four seed in the YSCC playoffs. The men finished second in the YSCC East before falling to eventual champion, the University of Maine at Machias, in the playoffs. A number of individual records fell under 11th-year head coach Jim Ford, including the mark for three-pointers in a game, rebounds in a season, and the all-time scoring record. The men also received the YSCC Sportsmanship Award, an honor voted on by each school in the conference.

UMA Women's bball players hugging on courtAfter spending much of the season undefeated atop the YSCC East Division, the women’s team ended their regular season as the third-ranked team in the country. They were awarded a bid to the 2016 United States Collegiate Athletic Association National Championship Tournament (USCAA), marking UMA’s second trip to the national tournament in the last three years and the second under head coach Jennifer Laney. During the championship, the team fell just short of victory ending their season on Thursday March 3rd with a loss to Penn State Beaver.

The UMA Moose reached many new records, and had much national and regional recognition for their success:

  • Brandon Rogers set a new record for rebounds with 459 rebounds on the season, shattering the former record of 380 set by alumni Moses Brathwaite in 2009-10. Rogers was recognized as one of the top players in the country, receiving USCAA First-Team for Division II honors, and named the Yankee Small College Conference Player of the Year.  He was second in scoring for the Moose with 21.2 points per contest. Rogers graduates as a member of the 1,000 point and 1,000 rebound club.
  • Keith Chesley was named Second Team All-American after receiving YSCC First-Team All-Conference recognition. Chesley finished the regular season ranked fourth in the country in scoring with 23.4 points per game, and leaves UMA as a member of the 2,000 point and 1,000 rebound club, and as the all-time leading scorer in UMA history when he passed alum Deon Cheers to become the all-time leading scorer in the history of UMA basketball.
  • Noah Thompson, in only his second collegiate basketball game, set the record for three-pointers in a game, nailing nine triples to break the 24 year old mark.
  • Jamie Plummer was named to the USCAA First-Team for the second year in a row. Plummer once again led the Moose in both points and rebounds, averaging 14.8 points and 10.8 rebounds per game. She ranked fifth in the conference in scoring and second in rebounds while also sitting in third place with blocks at 1.4 per game.
  • Darby Toth was named to the USCAA Second-Team making her a two-time All-American. Toth joined the 1,000 point club for her career during her senior season and ranked third in the conference in three-point percentage (34.8%) and also ranked second in the conference with assists at 4.7 per game. She finished the regular season averaging 11.8 points per game and also holds the record for three-pointers in a game at UMA.
  • Caitlin LaFountain received USCAA All-American Honorable Mention Honors after posting an outstanding freshman campaign. She finished just behind Plummer in both scoring and rebounding, averaging 14.1 points per game and 10 rebounds per contest. She had a career-game in the home finale for UMA, scoring 37 points.
Student Athletes at awards ceremony

Left to right, Chesley, Plummer, Toth, LaFontain, Rogers

Student-athletes must be of sophomore standing or higher and maintain at minimum 3.5 GPA.

The UMA Interactive Theater Project will showcase their original theater piece, ART, on Thursday, March 24 at 7pm at the Michael Klahr Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine.

The program is designed to perform in middle school classrooms to explore the themes of respect and accountability and will reach over 700 middle school students this semester. Beginning with a 20 minute performance of the original play, ART, this unique program features UMA students Kayla Bates, Talan Davis, Dray Emerson, Justin Hodgeman, and Mars Shafer and was created in partnership with both Cony and Gardiner Middle Schools.

The program becomes interactive as the main character turns to the audience and asks, “If you were in my shoes, what would you do?” Audience members then brainstorm solutions to the situations presented in the play as the actors stay in character. A discussion will follow the performance and actors will be on hand to share their experiences performing and interacting with the local school communities on the topics presented in the play.

UMA Interactive Theater is made possible by grants from the Maine Arts Commission, the Oak Grove School Foundation, and the UMA Presidential Mini Grant program. UMA Interactive Theater is under the direction of Adjunct Theater Professor Jeri Pitcher. For more information, contact Jeri Pitcher at jeri.pitcher@maine.edu.

2016 UMA Architecture Student Show

2016 Juried Student Architecture Show, February 29th through March 18th at the Charles Danforth Gallery

Opening Reception: Thursday, March 10th 4:30-6:30pm

The University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) is hosting its annual 2016 Juried Student Architecture Show February 29th through March 18th at the Charles Danforth Gallery. There will be an opening reception on Thursday, March 10th from 4:30-6:30pm

Featuring the work of students in UMA’s Bachelor of Architecture Program, the exhibition is a chance for students to showcase their projects which include design ideas across a broad spectrum of scales and contexts, as well as collaborative community projects, precedent studies, analysis of existing buildings, and thesis investigations.

Practicing architects, Judy Johnson, Michelle Phelps, and Graham Vickers will jury the show. Judy Johnson is a principal at Harriman Architects and Engineers as well as the past president of AIA Maine. Michelle Phelps, co-owner of Phelps Architects, Inc. is an accomplished designer with over twenty years’ experience in custom residential & commercial architecture with several notable recent publications in Maine Home and Design. Graham Vickers is an architect at SMRT Architects and for the last two years, has been serving on the board of the Portland Society of Architects.

UMA’s Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch) degree is the only five-year professional architecture degree program in Maine, and provides students with a path towards architectural licensure.

The Charles Danforth Gallery is located in Jewett Hall on UMA’s Augusta campus. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday from 9:00am to 5:00pm and on Friday from 9:00am to 3:00pm.

For more information about the exhibit or the program contact Associate Professor Eric Stark, director of the Architecture Program: eric.stark@maine.edu.

 

UMA Music Professor Steve GroverUMA Music Program presents Steve Grover in Concert on Friday, March 4th at 7:00pm at Jewett Hall Auditorium.

Local musician and UMA music professor Steve Grover will perform at UMA with a group of exceptional musicians for a free evening concert featuring the sounds of the piano, bass, saxophone as well as amazing vocals and poetry.

Joining drummer/composer Steven Grover on sage will be musical artists, Frank Carlberg on the piano, Christine Correa doing vocals, Chris Van Vorst Van Beest on the Bass, Duncan Hardy on Saxophone and poetry by Anthony Walton.

This concert is being held in conjunction with Grover’s new CD Release “Variations”.

The concert is free and open to the public, no tickets are necessary.

 

Squid Jiggers music groupThe “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College will feature Dave Rowe with The Squid Jiggers on Sunday, March 13, 2016, 2PM at Jewett Hall Auditorium. (Snow date: March 20th)

This concert will include both the easy listening originals of singer/songwriter Dave Rowe and the robust vocal harmonies of Dave Rowe and Troy R. Bennett as The Squid Jiggers.

Dave Rowe, son of Tom Rowe of the popular folk group Schooner Fare, started in “the family business” early on and added songwriting to playing.  Dave and Tom perform many Schooner Fare songs together, and combine their talents on guitar, bass, bodhran and tin whistle.  In addition to appearing with The Squid Jiggers, Troy R. Bennett tours extensively across New England with the Half Moon Jug Band, a high-octane folk group.

Tickets are $10, students $5, 12 & under free.  Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop  and at the door.  Call 621-3551, or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or for mail order tickets.  UMA students may obtain free tickets from the Student Life Office in Randall.

Artwork by students from 7 local high schools on display at UMA’s Richmond Gallery

Art students from seven local high schools are displaying their creative work in an exhibit called Higher Forms of Art, at UMA’s Richmond Gallery located in Handley Hall at 331 Water St. in downtown Augusta from March 4 – April 2, 2016. There will be an opening reception on Saturday, March 19th from 5:00-7:00pm.

UMA and the Kennebec Valley Art Association (KVAA) are celebrating Youth Art Month by presenting an exhibit of artwork by local students from Cony High School, Hall-Dale High School, Gardiner Regional High School, Kents Hill School, Monmouth Academy, Maranacook Community High School, and Richmond High School.

Higher Forms of Art gives emerging artists the opportunity to show their art in a professional gallery space, and to experience organizing and installing a major art exhibition. Students participate in hanging the exhibition and help with planning and organizing the shows opening event.

During the March 19th reception UMA will also hold an open house by offering tours of UMA’s art and architecture studios and classrooms which are located in Handley Hall, and give participants an opportunity to meet faculty, students and administrators.

Richmond Gallery hours are Wednesdays & Fridays 12-5pm and Saturdays 10am-1pm.

Here are some examples of the artwork on display:

artwork by Allison Frechette, 11th Grade, Kents Hill School

One in a Dozen, Allison Frechette, 11th Grade, Kents Hill School

artwork by Katie Sprague Grade 11 Kents Hill School

Imagination by Katie Sprague Grade 11 Kents Hill School

artwork by Taylor Hudlette, Senior, Richmond HS

Through the eye of iris, Taylor Hudlette, Senior, Richmond HS

artwork by Julie Plummer, Senior, Richmond HS

The last time you saw the trees turn red’ , Julie Plummer, Senior, Richmond HS

On Tuesday, February 16th University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) President Dr. James Conneely and Southern Maine Community College (SMCC) President Dr. Ron Cantor signed new agreements, referred to as the “Memo of Understanding” that ensure students who graduate with an Associates in Applied Science in Human Services from SMCC can seamlessly move into UMA’s Bachelor of Mental Health and Human Services and students who earn their Associates in Business Administration from SMCC can transition directly into UMA’s Bachelors of Business Administration. The agreements were signed at the University College (UC) Bath/Brunswick Center located at Brunswick Landing, a shared learning space among the institutions.

UMA and SMCC AdministratorsFront row (sitting) left to right:

UMA President James Conneely, SMCC President Ron Cantor

Back row (standing) left to right:

Dennis Unger, Director, UC Bath/Brunswick; Thomas Giordano, Associate Professor of Accounting and Business Administration Program Coordinator, UMA; Brenda McAleer, Dean of the College of Professional Studies and Associate Provost, UMA; Charles Gregory, Dean of Academic Affairs, SMCC; Shelley Taylor, Coordinator of Student Services, UC Bath/Brunswick; Katherine Trask, Associate Director of Enrollment and Admissions, UMA; James Whitten, Dean of the Midcoast Campus, SMCC; Margaret Fahey, Associate Dean for Curriculum Design and Articulation, SMCC

 

During school vacation break, on Tuesday, February 16th from 1:00 to 4:00 PM, pre-school to middle school aged children and their friends and family are invited to attend UMA’s 21st Annual Science Program for Kids. Sponsored by UMA’s Biology program, all activities are free and open to the public.

LArger than life inflatable colon

The Strollin’ Colon – Standing 12 feet long, by 10 feet wide, by 10 feet tall, this larger than life educational tool helps educate the public about colon cancer.

Activities will take place in several classrooms throughout UMA’s Jewett hall on UMA’s Augusta campus from 1:00 – 4:00 pm. New this year, take a walk through the “Strollin’ Colon.” Standing 12 feet long, by 10 feet wide, by 10 feet tall, this larger than life educational tool helps educate the public about colon cancer.

Other Actives Include:

  • Build a sustainable structure with architecture students.
  • Learn about Maine sharks & make a shark tooth necklace
  • Match the bones, skulls, and skeletons to the animal challenge.
  • Use microscopes to observe living creatures, insects, crystals….
  • Measure your lung capacity, % body fat, & blood pressure
  • See a dissection; build an arm and a leg from real bones.
  • Play doctor or nurse in the Health Clinic for teddy bears and baby dolls!
  • Find out how much sugar is in that snack or drink!
  • Join a team and take the Critter Quiz.
  • Healthy Eating Games & MyPlate Activities
  • Nature and science related arts and crafts.
  • Learn a little polymer chemistry and make slime.
  • Make DNA!
  • Experiment with Dr. Physics, he can make your head spin & your hair stand on end!

 

Fore more information about the Science Fair contact UMA Associate Professor of Science Susan Baker at sbak@maine.edu.

 

Provost Joseph Szakas today announced the University of Maine at Augusta’s 2015 Fall Semester Dean’s List. To be on the Dean’s List, a student must earn a 3.25 grade point average for a given semester and must be enrolled full-time.

FALL 2015 FULL – TIME DEAN’S LIST SORTED BY COUNTY

Androscoggin

Brian Boggs, Auburn; Jon Dupee, Auburn; Nimo Iman, Auburn; Cherise Letourneau, Auburn; Timothy Myers, Auburn; Kathryn Breed, Durham; Miranda Dixon, Lewiston; Rahma Elmi, Lewiston; Dan Ireland, Lewiston; Crystal Martin, Lewiston; Mary Mccarthy, Lewiston; Sarah Starkey, Lewiston; James Stewart, Lewiston; Denise Vaillancourt, Lewiston; Danielle Wadsworth, Lewiston; Heather-Lyn Worth, Lisbon; Gregg Garrison, Lisbon Falls; Haldon Bernard, Livermore; Nichole Gardner, Livermore Falls; Walt Whitman, Livermore Falls; Joshua Martin, Sabattus; Justine Plourde, Turner

Aroostook

Ashley Drinkall, Caribou; Jessica Chasse, Connor Twp; Abigail Theriault, Connor Twp; Ashlee Lawlor, Dyer Brook; Madeline Martin, Fort Fairfield; Sasha Valcourt, Fort Kent; Jolynn Stevens, Hodgdon; Jacob Tidd, Hodgdon; Jennifer Farrar, Houlton; Danielle Tarr, Houlton; Timothy Cook, Monticello; Bethany Cheyenne Goldsmith-Nichols, Monticello; Zachary Davis, Washburn;

Cumberland

Jamie Russell, Bridgton; Michael Barry, Brunswick; Andrew Davis, Brunswick; Molly Eames, Brunswick; Amy Feeley, Brunswick; Heather Freytag, Brunswick; Jordan Johnson, Brunswick; Cara Mia, Brunswick; Jacob Mitchell, Brunswick; Amanda Stevens, Brunswick; Crystal Cain Castro, Gorham; Rachel Ruel, Harrison; Sarah Howe, Naples; Melissa Robertson, New Gloucester; Christine Auclair, Portland; Alex Berger, Portland; Jon Dow, Portland; Cathryn Egan-Arnold, Portland; Kevin Martin, Portland; Winey Ogweta, Portland; Evelyn Johnston, Sebago; Michelle Aliberto, Standish; Taliesin Amero, Windham; Ashlie Myer, Windham; Marc Belley, Yarmouth; Laura Brooks, Yarmouth

Franklin

Sharon Doray, Chesterville; Benjamin Bailey, Farmington; Devin Phelps, Farmington; Chelsey Beaulieu, Jay; Brianna Farrington, Jay; Benjamin Hitchcock, Kingfield; Patrick Carlton, Wilton

Hancock

Stanley Kosinski, Amherst; Wesley Shepard, Amherst; Eric Kettell, Bucksport; Elizabeth Smith, Bucksport; Savannah Swett, Bucksport; Stephanie Hillock, Eastbrook; Harlee Webber, Eastbrook; Erik Bowcock, Ellsworth; Morgan Card, Ellsworth; Leeanna Conners, Ellsworth; Kyle Munn, Ellsworth; Carly Spear, Ellsworth; Nathan Eisworth, Franklin; Dana Ralbusky, Hancock; Patrick Skeate, Hulls Cove; John Cooper, Lamoine; Malerie Lockhart, Lamoine; Carlos Rosales, Lamoine; Vance Eldridge, Orland; Ashleigh Gerrish, Otis; Kiersten Rounseville, Seal Harbor; Alysia Reeder, Southwest Harbor; Anna Stockman, Southwest Harbor; Jamie Ames, Sullivan; Jennifer Stanley, Surry; Megan Tripler, Swans Island; Colleen Sargent, Trenton

Kennebec

Aaminah Aleem, Augusta; Jacob Allen, Augusta; Élise Bolduc, Augusta; Carmen Bragg, Augusta; Nicholas Bragg, Augusta; Molly Daniel, Augusta; Anna DeMerchant, Augusta; Shelby Edwards, Augusta; Michael Emerson, Augusta; Robert Foss, Augusta; Christopher Hall, Augusta; Corey Harris, Augusta; Sarah Harris, Augusta; Santa Havener, Augusta; Noah Hoffman, Augusta; Jamie Jellison, Augusta; Jay Joslyn, Augusta; Emily Karter, Augusta; Erika King, Augusta; Nathaniel Kliphan, Augusta; Rayna Knight, Augusta; Autumn Lagasse, Augusta; Jeremiah Lindelof, Augusta; Anthony Lopatosky, Augusta; Roger Mackbach, Augusta; Lynn Merrill, Augusta; Kelly Murphy, Augusta; Natasha OnoFrio, Augusta; Felisia Pooler, Augusta; Martha Pushard, Augusta; Kendra Robinson, Augusta; Jessica Rowe, Augusta; Serena Schnepper, Augusta; Bryant Sirois, Augusta; Ryan Soucie, Augusta; Nicholas Stiles, Augusta; Shelby-Lynn Tobey, Augusta; Dale Varnum, Augusta; Gnazoa Zady, Augusta; Bradley Bickford, Belgrade; Brad Blais, Belgrade; Richard Cormier, Belgrade; Brooke Grace, Belgrade; Michael Morang, Belgrade; Joshua Simms, Belgrade; Thomas Stinson, Belgrade; Trisha Cowan, Belgrade Lakes; Lauren Pelletier, Belgrade Lakes; Sydnee Cutler, Benton; Ashley Whittemore, Benton; Dawn Baker, Chelsea; Kannikar Chottisavang, Chelsea; Christopher Daggett, Chelsea; Emily Smithson, China; Michael Hollander, Clinton; Lisa Hunter, Clinton; Courtney Koller, Clinton; Brittany Hanson, Fairfield; Eric Sander, Fairfield; Jessica Blake, Farmingdale; Roland Choate, Farmingdale; Nickolas Faneuff, Farmingdale; Stephanie Grant, Farmingdale; Jarod Lawton, Farmingdale; Jared Bernier, Gardiner; Robert Condon, Gardiner; Ashley Healey, Gardiner; Megan Kenyon, Gardiner; Erica Kilde, Gardiner; Hannah Mercier, Gardiner; Jeffrey Mercier, Gardiner; Gretchen Migliaccio, Gardiner; Mariah Moore, Gardiner; Derek Pritchard, Gardiner; Rosalia Rodriguez-Bumpus, Gardiner; Michelle Ross, Gardiner; Robert Thompson, Gardiner; Christina Williams, Gardiner; Haley McPherson, Hallowell; Zachary Pulsifer, Hallowell; Abbey Slinker, Hallowell; Eli Trask, Hallowell; Alyssa Chabot, Kents Hill; Daniel Chute, Kents Hill; Jessica Casey, Litchfield; Elizabeth Knight, Manchester; Hannah McLaughlin, Manchester; Kari Mullen-McLaughlin, Manchester; Rosemary Bryant, Monmouth; Jennie Gendreau, Monmouth; Krystin Kemp, Monmouth; Daryl Madore, Monmouth; River Mullan, Monmouth; Jackqulyn Galbreath, Mount Vernon; Allison Hutchins, Mount Vernon; Elizabeth Levesque, Mount Vernon; Deloris Krehbiel, North Monmouth; Brett Wilson, North Monmouth; Autumn Althenn, Oakland; Sara Moore, Oakland; Brooke Brochu, Pittston; Halee Flewelling, Pittston; Shana Jackson, Pittston; Samantha Kensell, Pittston; Tori MacDougall, Pittston; Krysty Woodcock, Pittston; Laurena Cunningham, Randolph; Kristen Veayo, Randolph; Jonathon Lawrence, Readfield; Brittney Fairfield, Rome; Samantha Matthews, Sidney; Arik Ross, Sidney; Samantha Wenzel, Sidney; Carolyn Winchenbach, Sidney; Catherine Wyatt, Sidney; Andrew Breault, South China; Hannah Bridges, South China; Zackary Busmanis, South China; Heather Seigars, South China; Jodi Shaw, South China; Stephanie Mansir, South Gardiner; Donald Camp, Vassalboro; Jonathan Carter, Vassalboro; Mary Margaret Libby, Vassalboro; Brittney Begin, Waterville; Laura Box, Waterville; Sheila Jordan, Waterville; Sarah Malloy, Waterville; Stephanie Noonan, Waterville; Jeffrey Stout, Waterville; Nallie Thor, Waterville; Ashley Wing, Waterville; Betsy Dufour, Wayne; Riley Smith, Wayne; Kristina Stewart, Wayne; Daniel Allen, West Gardiner; Leanne Buttery, West Gardiner; Charlotte MacDonald, West Gardiner; Tammy Morang, West Gardiner; Craig Brann, Windsor; Megan Brents, Windsor; James Longfellow, Windsor; Richard Frappier, Winslow; Angel Abbott, Winthrop; Deborah Abbott, Winthrop; Joseph Emery, Winthrop; Cameron MacMillan, Winthrop; Madison McCarthy, Winthrop; Tara Stevens, Winthrop;

Knox

Aryana Davis, Camden; Kendall Espinosa, Camden; Rebecca Harding, Camden; Douglas Lord, Camden; Ashlee Seavey, Camden; Sarah Steele, Camden; Carla Taggart, Camden; Michaela Poor, Cushing; Chandler Barter, Friendship; Stephanie Ross, Friendship; Rachael Hendrick, Owls Head; Elizabeth Brown, Rockland; Marissa Heal, Rockland; Janet Mott, Rockland; Michael Norton, Rockland; Carrie Sachse, Rockland; Violet Bemis, Rockport; Jacqueline Campbell, Rockport; Chase Macioch, Rockport; Erica Smith, Rockport; James Gregory, South Thomaston; Rachel Williams, South Thomaston; Kathleen Darney, Thomaston; Tabbitha Johnston, Thomaston; Denita McWilliams, Thomaston; Christy Preston, Thomaston; Brenna McAfee, Union; Cherri Merrifield, Union; Joseph Murphy, Union; Pamela Robinson, Union; Colby Rogers, Union; Kelly Leidenroth, Warren; Christina Torres-York, Warren

Lincoln

Tyson Bailey; Alna; Reilly Kane; Boothbay; Nicole Taylor; Bremen; Diane Bibber-Oden; Dresden; Angela Musto; Dresden; Annamaria Geneseo; East Boothbay; Jessica Buzzell; Jefferson; Jennifer Delano; Jefferson; Paige Geroux; Jefferson; Jessica Peaslee; Jefferson; Nicole Mahoney; New Harbor; Maranda Hatch; Newcastle; Teresa Brooks; Waldoboro; Colleen Hilt; Waldoboro; Leslie Lorentzen; Waldoboro; Zachary Melvin; Waldoboro; Luke Myers; Waldoboro; Mary Temple; Waldoboro; Kristine Wagstaff; Waldoboro; Courtney Alexander; Whitefield; Rebekah Friel; Whitefield; Benjamin Garthoff; Whitefield; Brittany Shorey; Whitefield; Rebeccah Smith; Whitefield; Haley Bailey; Wiscasset; Candace Chapman; Wiscasset

Oxford

Laurie Hanscom Harmon, Albany Twp; Elisabeth Devine, Bethel; Amy Grant, Buckfield; Amy Stevens, Buckfield; Marianne Young, Carthage; Tiffany Labbe, Hartford; Benjamin Stoodley, Hartford; Daniel Richard, Mexico; Denielle Richard, Mexico; Maria Brown, Norway; Kelley Evtushek, Norway; Raymond Heikkinen, Norway; Stacy Johnson, Norway; Dori Lynn, Norway; Emily Oko, Norway; Dorothy Dyer, Otisfield; Danielle Giansanti, Oxford; Aleks Krastins, Oxford; Jenny Scribner, Oxford; Amanda Allen, Peru; Sheila Albanesi, Rumford; Candace Arsenault, Rumford; Chad Jones, Rumford; Jacob Simard, Rumford; Teresa York, Rumford; Katrina Adams, South Paris; Naomi Foster, South Paris; Shawna Ramsay, South Paris; Kyle Straiton, South Paris; Bryanne Starbird, Waterford; Laura Abbott, West Paris; Michelle Buckman, West Paris; Jennifer Constantine, West Paris; Brandan Roberts, West Paris; Martha Thompson, West Paris

Penobscot

Kelsey Best, Bangor; John Birmingham, Bangor; Carly Cloukey, Bangor; Megan Collins, Bangor; Emily Day, Bangor; Christina Demmons, Bangor; Brandi-Jo Dewitt, Bangor; Ericka England, Bangor; Susanna Fay, Bangor; Briana Field, Bangor; Emily Ford, Bangor; Elisia Gamlin, Bangor; Michael Gignac, Bangor; Danielle Gray, Bangor; Richele Grenier, Bangor; Ryan Grindle, Bangor; Lettie Harris, Bangor; Aylah Ireland, Bangor; Jaclyn Johnson, Bangor; Amy Jones, Bangor; Whitney Jordan, Bangor; Alyssa Keezer, Bangor; Erin Kinney, Bangor; Tiffany Lamarre, Bangor; Emily Luce, Bangor; Kelly Lyon, Bangor; Ashlee Mandravelis, Bangor; Jennifer McClure, Bangor; Teresa McGraw, Bangor; Holly Merchant, Bangor; Sarah Miller, Bangor; Raymond Nason, Bangor; Jordan Platt, Bangor; Jessie Robinson, Bangor; Regan Robson, Bangor; Amber Sawyer, Bangor; Victoria Searles, Bangor; Ross Shaler, Bangor; Keely Shorette, Bangor; Lindsey Stevens, Bangor; Jeremy Tanis, Bangor; Tabitha Taylor, Bangor; Makaela Thompson, Bangor; Jessica Walsh, Bangor; Amanda Willard-Morrill, Bangor; Jeffrey Williams, Bradford; Erin Chabe, Bradley; Justin Ambrose, Brewer; Tiffany Channell, Brewer; Matthew Clark, Brewer; Amber Clukey, Brewer; Jacob Decesere, Brewer; Krystal Higgins, Brewer; Crystal Karim, Brewer; Nicholas Leeman, Brewer; Erica Murray, Brewer; Patrick Nolan, Brewer; Kelli Okyere, Brewer; Brandy Radke, Brewer; Anastasia Salls, Brewer; Jessica Silliboy, Brewer; Jennifer Stano, Brewer; Lori Bigelow, Carmel; Carlos Graves, Carmel; Emily Spinney, Corinth; Chelsea Hardy, Dixmont; Karen Knowlton, East Newport; Gretchen Currie, Eddington; Skip Van Dyne, Eddington; Vivian Larrabee, Glenburn; Nichole Rockwell, Glenburn; Michael Williams, Greenbush; Lance Ambrose, Hampden; Samantha Bowler, Hampden; Joseph Doyon, Hampden; Kimberly Dunham, Hampden; Samantha Kennedy, Hampden; Nicole Parker, Hampden; Megan Sommers, Hampden; Emily Adams, Hermon; Jennifer Alley, Hermon; Megan Whitney, Hermon; Brittany Albert, Holden; Remay Burke, Holden; Ashlie Page, Holden; Richard Thorp, Holden; Priscilla Clark, Howland; Brittney Smith, Kenduskeag; Nicole Ciulla, Lee; Jason Ludden, LEE; Carmen Bernardini, Levant; Teresa Daly, Levant; Brennan Derepentigny, Levant; Jasmine St. Pierre, Levant; Sarah Gardner, Lincoln; Jamey House, Lincoln; Brooke Kennedy, Lincoln; Linwood Severance, Lincoln; Kelcey Steward, Lincoln; Melissa Troulis, Lincoln; Emily Boyd, Medway; Paul Coover, Medway; Carl Segee, Medway; Antoinette Thompson, Medway; Alana Boisvert, Milford; Terri Brown, Milford; Allyson LaPoint, Milford; Kathleen Pelkey, Milford; Lorrie Nadeau, Millinocket; Kara Bickford, Newport; Drew Graves, Newport; Monica Aaskov, Old Town; Haley Brown, Old Town; Eve Dunham, Old Town; Zachary Levesque, Old Town; Hannah Priest, Old Town; April Sawyer, Old Town; Alisha Stannard, Old Town; Gabrielle Willette, Old Town; Glory Ingraham, Orono; David L’Heureux, Orono; Alicia Nejako, Orono; Raelene Bouchard, Orrington; Dusty Hillman, Orrington; Emily Leonard, Orrington; Kimberly Bubar, Passadumkeag; Kami Guiggey, Stacyville; Ashley Harnden, Veazie; Laurie Dow, Woodville

Piscataquis

Brittany Burnett, Abbot; Rachelle Atwater, Dover Foxcroft; Samantha Donahue, Dover Foxcroft; Tucker Dow, Dover Foxcroft; Melissa Higgins, Dover Foxcroft; Jennifer Sylvain, Dover Foxcroft; Tianna Breau, Greenville

Sagadahoc

Angela Commeau, Bath; Teresa Coffey, Bowdoin; Benjamin Brown, Bowdoinham; Abbie Kontio, Bowdoinham; Lisa LaPointe, Bowdoinham; Alyssa Rollins, Bowdoinham; Erynn Taylor, Bowdoinham; Sonia Campbell, Phippsburg; Matthew Carter, Richmond; Donovan Chapman, Richmond; Alissa Coulombe, Richmond; Elise Faris, Richmond; Nathaniel Koch, Richmond; Daniel Ouellette, Richmond; Jamie Plummer, Richmond; Elysia Robinson, Richmond; Susan Crosby, Topsham; Christie Keller, Topsham; Caitlin LaFountain, Topsham; Shannon Munsey, Topsham; Billie-Lee Sullivan, Topsham; Melissa Ward, Topsham; Hallie Johnston, Woolwich

Somerset

Jamie Kemper, Bingham; Jasmine Browne, Canaan; Jennifer Snowman, Canaan; Tori Dyer, Cornville; Haley Strout, Cornville; Wendy Rolfe, Detroit; Lydia Mather, Fairfield; Danny Chambers, Harmony; Scathach Chambers, Harmony; Nathan Michaud, Hartland; Arend Thibodeau, Hartland; Brianna Wilshusen, Hartland; Christina Richardson, Madison; Hilarie Frederick, Norridgewock; Jennifer Bradley, Palmyra; Marie Kuntz, Palmyra; Kathleen Reheuser, Palmyra; Scott Garbiel, Pittsfield; Melissa Wone, Pittsfield; Heather Elkins, Shawmut; Robin Cochrane-Crane, Solon; Omie Dove, Solon; Billie Lawrence, Solon; Kaitlyn Babin, Starks

Waldo

Monicque Deschamps, Belfast; Beth Lacasse, Belfast; Heather Marlow, Belfast; Cassandra Thayer, Belfast; Krysti Hall, Islesboro; Carrin Pitcher, Knox; Margaret Fowler, Lincolnville; Janelle Thornley, Montville; Jamie Dodge-Newton, Morrill; Matthew Converse, Unity; Joshua Roberts, Unity; Jennifer Therrien, Winterport

Washington

Tracy Berry, Alexander; Alicia Roderick, Baileyville; Charlotte Southard, Baileyville; Rebecca Weaver, Machias; Jordan Clark, Milbridge; Kimberly Carter, Princeton; Angela Geel, Whitneyville

York

Lee Demers, Arundel; Ashley Beard, Biddeford; Mallyssa Leng, Biddeford; Josie Gerry, Buxton; Samantha Townsend, Limington; Jocelyn Acheson, North Waterboro; Pamela Belisle, Old Orchard Beach; Stacy Casvikes, Saco; George Sevigny, Shapleigh; Lien Fajardo, Springvale

Out of State

Bruce  Engelfried, San Ramon, CA; Melissa Hill, Bakersfield, CA; Jeremy Huffer, Oakdale, CT; Darby Toth, Port Charlotte, FL; Michelle Ledesma, Cantonment, FL; Casi Farrar, Jensen Beach, FL; Gabrielle Dore, Winter Haven, FL; Marc Oliver, Mableton, GA; Austin David, Eddyville, IA; Amanda, Shaffer, Groveland, IL; Hannah Tyce, Bloomington, IN; Cassie Sallee. Elizabethtown, KY; Joddie Ames, New Ipswich. NH; Morgan McNaughton, Newmanstown, PA; Hope Sagnip. East Stroudsburg, PA; Vanessa Kopp, Moncks Corner, SC; Debra Checque, San Antonio, TX;

International

Pierre Laot, Guipavas, France; Heather Elliott, Wainwright, Alberta, Canada

For questions about the Dean’s Lists contact Ann Corbet in UMA’s Registrar’s Office at 207-621 3145 or annie@maine.edu.

Jobs for Maine GraduatesJobs for Maine’s Graduates (JMG) Specialist Jacob Marcoux has been at UMA since the fall of 2015 and has been successfully working with 30 UMA students over the past semester providing them with the support they need to stay in school and work towards a UMA degree.

The University of Maine System recently announced its new JMG College Success Program, an effort among three of its campuses, the University of Maine at Augusta, University of Southern Maine, and University of Maine Machias, and with Southern Maine Community College, Kennebec Valley Community College, and Washington County Community College.

“JMG’s College Success Program is actively working to connect with JMG students while they are still in high school in an effort to not only encourage college aspirations, but to help them knock down any barriers that might prevent them from pursuing a degree at UMA. Once they are here on campus, it is my mission to help each and every one of them stay in school and earn a degree,” said UMA’s JMG Specialist Jacob Marcoux.

Created in 1993 by Maine State Legislation, JMG helps Maine high school seniors, who face barriers to education, reconnect to school and successfully graduate and transition into the workforce.  Last year, through Legislative Bill LD 215, JMG broadened the program to improve retention at the college level.

“JMG is a natural extension of what we aim to do for our students here at UMA and we are honored to be involved in the program,” said UMA President James Conneely. “It not only ensures that we give each and every one of these students the high quality education they deserve, but that they also receive that extra support and guidance they need to reach their full potential.“

UMA’s JMG students, who range from Augusta based to Bangor, as well as various locations throughout the state taking classes at University College Centers and online, have either participated in the program since high school, have been in Foster Care, or have attained their high school equivalency diploma through an alternative program within the last five years.

In addition to supporting UMA’s 30 JMG students, Marcoux has continued to work toward connecting Maine’s JMG high school programs to UMA’s JMG program by arranging high school visits and hosting a JMG exhibit aimed at superintendents from around the state.

Transgender Maine Bangor Exhbit PosterThe University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) and the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine (HHRC) are proud to present the Bangor installation of Transgender Maine, an exhibit focusing on Maine people who identify as transgender, those who support and advocate for them, and the efforts in Maine to get equal rights and recognition for the needs and health of transgender people.

The exhibit will run from February 2nd through March 25th at the Nottage Library on the Bangor campus of UMA, located in Belfast Hall at 85 Texas Avenue, Bangor.  There will be an opening event on Tuesday, February 2nd from 5:30 to 7 p.m., with a brief presentation beginning at 6:15 p.m. featuring speakers Davida Ammerman, Einstein Hickman, and David Greenham.

Transgender Maine will feature stories of transgender individuals, as well as some of the history of the issues relating to gender in Maine. HHRC Program Director David Greenham has led the process of research and partnered with more than 50 groups and individuals. Through photos, film, audio recordings, documents, and artifacts, the HHRC has created an educational and informative exhibit.

Transgender Maine is made possible with support and contributions from the UMA Diversity Committee, Maine Transnet, Equality Maine, The Maine Transgender Lobby, Safe Space Radio, The Trans Youth Equality Foundation, The Maine State Archives, The Whitefield Historical Society, The Maine State Museum, The Sampson Archives at USM, The Maine Women’s Lobby, USM Center for Sexualities and Gender Diversity, The Maine People’s Alliance, the Schlesinger Library at Harvard, The Transgender Archives at the University of Victoria, B.C., Canada, SAGE Maine, Maine People’s Alliance, GLSEN; and many individuals throughout Maine.

This installation is a partnership of the Women Invigorating Curriculum and Celebrating Diversity committee of UMA; Rainbows, the LGBT student club on campus; Nottage Library; the UMA Honors Program; and the HHRC.

Exhibit hours are Monday-Thursday, 8am-7pm; Friday, 8:30am-4:30pm, and Saturday & Sunday, 12:30-4:30pm.

George LopezThe “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College will feature George Lopez, Classical pianist, on Sunday, February 7, 2016, 2PM at Jewett Hall Auditorium. There will be a pre-concert talk at 1PM. (Snow date: February 28th)

George Lopez, Bowdoin College’s Robert Beckwith Artist in Residence, has been a dedicated and dynamic performer, educator, and lecturer for over 25 years. Mr. Lopez recently premiered a new piano concerto here in Maine, and is also comfortable in styles of music ranging from jazz, ragtime to more contemporary styles of improvisation.

In addition to touring in the U.S. and Mexico in 2015, he made his first visit to Cuba to give masterclasses and concerts with the Aries Trio. His “Music in the Museum” series at Bowdoin consists of creative and engaging lecture recitals on the relationship of music to art and ideas. Mr. Lopez is the conductor of the Bowdoin Chamber Orchestra made up of students from the college and local high schools.

Tickets are $10, students $5, 12 & under free. Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop and at the door. Call 621-3551, or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or for mail order tickets.

Website: www.concertsatjewett.com

The next concert is Sunday, March 13, 2016, 2PM – Dave Rowe and Dave Rowe with Troy Bennett as The Squid Jiggers (Snow date March 20th)

 

January 21, 2016

The University of Maine at Augusta has been awarded a $395,890 grant from the Department of Education to support strategic student success initiatives.

“We are both humbled and grateful that the Department of Education is able support UMA’s efforts to strengthen our student support services to meet the needs of Mainers,” said UMA President James Conneely.

“The funding will focus on enhancing new student on-boarding processes, helping students build stronger connections to their academic majors, embedding student support in classes, and making student support services available through mobile devices,” he added.

As with most major grant efforts, this successful application involved the combined efforts of many dedicated UMA staff members and departments. It is anticipated that the initial $395,890 award will be renewable for 5 years for a total grant of up to $1,682,568.

“We extend our sincere thanks to Senator Collins and Senator King for their continued support and advocacy for Maine students and for the University of Maine at Augusta,” said President Conneely.

The funding will reside in UMA’s Office of the Dean of Students and is expected to create two new staff positions to help support the student success initiatives.

For the fourth year in a row, U.S. News & World Reports has selected the University of Maine at Augusta in its national ranking of universities offering top online bachelor’s degree programs.

After ranking in U.S. News & World Report top picks for the past three years UMA has made a steady climb from 103rd in 2013, to 61st in 2014, 40th in 2015, and now 30th in the newly released 2016 list of universities with the Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs in the nation.

“UMA is committed to making quality higher education accessible to every student, including those who need the flexibility of online classes,” said UMA President Rebecca Wyke. “Our steady climb to 30th in the nation is a testament to the hard work and dedication of UMA’s faculty and staff who work to strengthen the delivery of UMA’s online education and increase its variety of online offerings each year,” she added.

42% of UMA’s students currently complete the majority of their coursework online, up from 36% at this time last year.

UMA offers nine online degree programs in Applied Science, Business Administration, Computer Information Systems, Information and Library Services, Justice Studies, Liberal Studies, Mental Health and Human Services, Public Administration, and Social Sciences.

The U.S. News & World Report rankings are based on statistical data gathered from questionnaires about each institution’s online specific bachelor’s degree programs.  The factors considered were, faculty credentials and training, peer reputation, student services and technology, and student engagement.

A full list of the Best Online Bachelor’s Programs in the survey can be found here: http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/bachelors/rankings?int=999208

The individual scoring for the University of Maine at Augusta can be found here: http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/university-of-maine-at-augusta-161217

The “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College will feature “Jessie and Greg Boardman with Ellen Gawler” on Sunday, January 24, 2016, 2PM at Jewett Hall Auditorium

Ellen Gawler of Gawler Family Band will join local musicians Jessie and Greg Boardman to present a lively concert of Downeast, Celtic and Quebecois folk music. With guitar, cello, viola, singing and plenty of fiddling, they bring a live traditional repertoire with both crisp authenticity and inventiveness.

Whether crooning a melancholy Maine ballad or delivering a driving, toe tapping French-Canadian fiddle tune, this trio delights in the synergy that’s created whenever they come together. Jessie and Greg, founder and longtime teacher at Maine Fiddle Camp, together with Ellen, founder of the Pineland Fiddlers, have played a large part in the burgeoning youth fiddle scene in Maine. This concert will surely be a musical treat and will warm up your winter as well as lighten your hearts.

Tickets are $10, students $5, 12 & under free. Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop and at the door. Advance ticket purchase is recommended. Call 621-3551, or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or for mail order tickets.

 

 

Art Work by By Susan Dean Smith

By Susan Dean Smith

Exhibition: A Sense of Place / El Sentido del Lugar
Where:  Danforth Gallery, University of Maine at Augusta Campus
Dates: January 18 through February 19, 2016
Opening Reception: Sunday, January 24, 2016, 2-4 pm.

A Sense of Place / El Sentido del Lugar, debuts at the Danforth Gallery on the University of Maine at Augusta campus from January 18th through February 19, 2016. A gala reception at the Danforth Gallery will be held January 24th from 2:00-4:00pm.

The exhibit is a collaborative printmaking art show of 90 original works. Circling the Square Fine Art Press of Gardiner, Maine and Fundación Estampería Quiteña of Quito, Ecuador celebrate a visual conversation on sustainability, biodiversity and the effects of the local on the global. The exhibit will travel to five other venues in the state this year and open in Metropolitan Cultural Center in Quito, Ecuador in March.

Art Work by Jennifer Strode

By Jennifer Strode

Fifteen artists from Fundación Estampería Quiteña and seventeen from Circling the Square Fine Art Press are participants. Ten of the artists from Maine have either graduated from UMA or taken printmaking classes there. Press member Judith Long, who has family in Quito, was the International Facilitator who brought the two presses together for this project and facilitated the English and Spanish conversations.

The Maine participants are: Karen Adrienne, Circling the Square Fine Art Press Director, Robin Brooks, Judith DeMilo-Brown, Christine J. Higgins, Judith Long, Diana McFarland, Christine Olson, Rebeka Ouellette, Jane Page-Conway, Donna Parkinson, Ellen Roberts, Kris Sader, Susan Dean Smith, J. P. Strode, Sarah Vosmus, Lisa F. Wheeler, Barbra Whitten.

Art Work by Ellen Roberts

By Ellen Roberts

The artists from each press have created two limited edition prints and one intervention print focused on sustainability and biodiversity. The “intervention print” initiated by each artist was then sent to artists at the other press for completion. These shared visions and artistic conversations contribute to the local and global intention of the exhibit and bring two presses that are 3,800 miles apart together. A bilingual exhibition catalog for the exhibition will be available at each venue in Maine and Ecuador.

Danforth Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday from 9:00am to 5:00pm and on Friday from 9:00am to 3:00pm.

UMA Professor Carey ClarkThe American Nurses Association of Maine (ANA, Maine) honored University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) Assistant Professor of Nursing, Dr. Carey Clark on December 4th with the Sister Consuela White Award.

Clark was honored for her dedication to the spirit of nursing by the care, concern, respect and knowledge that she has demonstrated as a leader and educator in UMA’s Bachelor of Science – Nursing Completion Program.

UMA Student Studying with book and computerHTY 389 History of American Technology

Technology in America is not new.  For those interested in technological developments and the evolution of computing, join us in this topics course HTY 389 History of American Technology in the spring of 2016.  This is an online course that investigates the social, gender and class factors in technological development.

Course description:

This course examines the history of American technology from colonial times to the present.  It investigates the social, gender and class factors in technological development.  It will pay particular attention to the evolution of computing from the early pioneers through the internet.  Students will develop their ability to research, analyze and make judgments.

Prerequisite: ENG 101. and HTY 103 or HTY 104 or permission of instructor.  3 credits.

Register now! Contact UMA Enrollment Services at 1-877-UMA-1234.

Forum on the Future LogoYoung and Old, Learning and Working Together
Sunday, January 10,  2:00 PM
Jewett Auditorium

UMA Senior College will present a forum entitled, “Young and Old, Learning and Working Together,” on Sunday January 10th from 2:00 -4:00 PM in Jewett Hall Auditorium at the University of Maine at Augusta.

With the modern age traditional family consisting of only parents and children at home with grandparents often times living alone or in retirement communities, traditional cross generational interaction is diminishing.  Reaching across the divide, and finding purpose for older people, are volunteer programs developed to enable older and younger people to collaborate and interact.

The forum will include a panel discussion highlighting significant volunteer activities that reach across generations. Speakers include Ruth Saint Amand, Director of MaineGeneral’s Retired Senior & Volunteer Program, Marianne Pinkham, Director of  Spectrum Generations centers who will describe her work as an Enrichment Coordinator with second-graders, and Terry McPhetres, a 12-year volunteer and current board member with Big Brothers/Big Sisters program.

The panelists will discuss impediments and problems which arise when younger and older people work and learn together and how these issues are resolved.

This forum is first of a series on how society may address the under-utilization of the elderly and expand their interaction with younger generations.

Forum on the Future is a series of lectures put on by the UMA College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College. It is is free and open to the public, refreshments will be provided. A snow date is set for Jan. 31st.

Downeast BrassThe “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College will present “A Christmas Concert: Downeast Brass with Jay Zoller, Organist” on Sunday, December 20, 2015, 2PM at the South Parish Congregational Church, 9 Church Street, Augusta.

For years South Parish Congregational Church and its fine organist, Jay Zoller, have shared their magnificent organ with the public in a special holiday concert featuring the Downeast Brass Quintet. For the past few years, Concerts at Jewett has been happy to join them in co-sponsoring this event.

Jay ZollerMr. Zoller plays the historic 1866 E. & G. G. Hook Organ for services and concerts. He comes to South Parish with long experience in church music and recital playing.

The Downeast Brass has performed in many New England settings. Audiences have enjoyed these fine Maine performers on the concert stage, at weddings, festivals, and on parade. Their wide range of musical styles makes them the preferred musical choice for many occasions.

Tickets are $10, students $5, 12 & under free. Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop, and at the door. Call 622-3551, or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or mail order tickets. Website: www.concertsatjewett.com

Hook OrganNext concert: Sunday, January 24, 2016, 2PM – The Gawler Family with Jessie and Greg Boardman

Media contact:
Irene Forster
207-445-5227
iforster@fairpoint.net

Ways to Register:

Spring 2016 registration is open! Register now. Classes begin on January 19th. See our course offerings for the spring semester here: http://www.uma.edu/academics/courseguide/

Contact us for help:

  • UMA’s Augusta campus – 1-877-UMA-1234 Monday through Thursday from 8:00am – 7:00pm and on Friday from 8:00am – 5:00pm
  • UMA’s Bangor campus – 207-262-7800 from 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. MondayFriday
  • University College Centers – learn.maine.edu

Spring 2016 Highlights:

CIS 389​ – Oracle 11g: PL/SQL Programming, a hands-on class designed to provide a working introduction to PL/SQL programming within the Oracle® RDBMS environment. More info »

HTY 389 History of American Technology, a class that examines the history of American technology from colonial times to the present. More info »

 


Apply Now!

Marketing photo - UMA student applying to UMA

With the spring 2016 semester just around the corner, there is no better time to apply to UMA. Check out our degree programs and contact us. We are excited to walk you through the admissions and registration process.

  • UMA studnt working on computer while sitting in Katz LibraryAre you a data analyst that needs to create complex reports that take more than just basic query language to produce?
  • Are you an application developer wondering where the best place for your business logic is?
  • Do you have programming skills you want to extend?
  • Want to take advantage of the power of PL/SQL?

PL/SQL program units are stored and compiled in the database, run within the Oracle executable and inherit the robustness, security, and portability of the Oracle® Database (ORACLE Corporation).

 

UMA Students Sitting in a Computer Information Systems ClassRegister now for CIS 389​ – Oracle 11g: PL/SQL Programming.

Offered in the mini-spring semester from 02/​10​/2016 – 04/​11​/2016​ on Wednesdays from 1-3:45. Both online and in class meetings.

To register contact UMA at 1-877-UMA-1234

 

 

 

Course Description

This course is hands-on, designed to provide a working introduction to PL/SQL programming within the Oracle® RDBMS environment. The course begins with an introduction to the PL/SQL language fundamentals of block program structure, variables, cursors, and exceptions. The remainder of the course covers creating program units including procedures, functions, triggers and packages.  Oracle supplied utilities such as Oracle Mail, SQL Loader, and others are discussed.

Course Objective

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Create PL/SQL program blocks
  • Identify and use appropriate programming constructs to fulfill application logic needs
  • Manipulate database tables using PL/SQL programming
  • Build error trapping facilities within PL/SQL programs
  • Create PL/SQL program units including: procedures, functions, triggers, and packages
  • Use Oracle-supplied packages in PL/SQL program units

Additional Information

  • We will be using TOAD® (Tool for Oracle Application Development) as the development environment for this course.  Toad® for Oracle® is the number one productivity solution for Oracle® database development and administration.  (TOAD World).  TOAD® will be accessible to all registered students via our virtual computing environment.  No purchase or local install will be necessary
  • The course is scheduled for 7 weeks and will be conducted as follows:
    • Lecture material pertaining to the chapter being covered will be prepared and, presented via Video that may be viewed at any time.  During this presentation, chapter material will be presented via code examples.  Code examples will be available to the student after the lecture.
    • A classroom meeting will be held approximately once per week on the Augusta Campus.  During this meeting, selected problems will be coded in class.

About the Instructor

J Gregory Jolda is a Lecturer in Computer Information Systems.  He has been teaching courses in programming and database design and development for over 15 years.  He has also designed and implemented databases for Hedge fund management, record-keeping agencies, accounting firms, and the state of Maine using Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server platforms.

 

To register contact UMA at 1-877-UMA-1234

James Conneely, 2015 UMA Presidential CandidateProven leader in expanding access and service to non-traditional and first-generation students named UMA President following national search and consideration of more than 70 candidates

University of Maine System Chancellor James Page announced that Dr. James F. Conneely will be the new President of the University of Maine at Augusta. With campuses in Augusta, Bangor, and University College Centers in eight rural or underserved communities, the University of Maine at Augusta has a statewide mission of expanding access to higher education for learners of all ages, locations and backgrounds.

Dr. Conneely was selected as a finalist for the presidency following an extensive national search process that resulted in an applicant pool of more than 70 candidates and campus visits earlier in the fall when students, staff, faculty and community members engaged in discussions with three presidential finalists that significantly shaped the outcome of the selection process.

Dr. Conneely will begin work on January 19, 2016. In addition to serving as the President of UMA he will join the leadership team of the University of Maine System as a valued partner in the work to establish One University for all of Maine. The One University effort is a pioneering initiative that seeks to ensure that all Maine’s public university resources can be brought to bear in support of every Maine student, business and community.

“Together we chose Dr. Conneely as our new leader through a collective understanding of where UMA is in its fifty-year evolution as an institution of higher learning and our shared agreement that we must work even harder to assist those who have the farthest to go to reach their desired destination,” said Marjorie Medd, Chair of the UMA Presidential Search Committee and a Member of the UMS Board of Trustees.

“The faculty and staff at UMA and the University College Centers understand and have embraced the idea that every learner can succeed,” said Chancellor James H. Page “Any review of Dr. Conneely’s credentials and accomplishments makes it clear he is ready to lead this university. He has built a 30-year career identifying, enrolling, supporting and graduating the very same students we work so hard to reach here at UMA.”

“The University of Maine at Augusta is building a national reputation as a leader in helping students achieve regardless of age, background or location thanks to the dedication of its talented faculty and staff,” said Dr. James F. Conneely, the newly named President of the University of Maine at Augusta.

“It is privilege to bring my experience in expanding access and passion for student service and success to a university so focused on helping learners of all types and from all corners of Maine think bigger and achieve more,” continued Conneely. “UMA and the stories of its students are inspiring, and I am grateful for the opportunity to join a statewide team of educators with an unmatched commitment to helping students reach new opportunities through higher education.”
Augusta Availability: Dr. Conneely is being introduced by Chancellor Page in the Fireside Lounge of the Randall Center of the Augusta campus Tuesday, December 1st at 10 AM.

Bangor Availability: Dr. Conneely and Chancellor Page will then visit the Bangor Campus for a welcome reception at 1:00 PM on Tuesday, December 1st in room 124 of the Eastport Hall.

Further background on Dr. Conneely’s career in higher education can be found here.

Downeast Brass music group with instrumentsChristmas Concert:  Downeast Brass with Jay Zoller, Organist, South Parish Congregational Church, Augusta, Sunday,  December 20, 2015, 2PM

The “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College will present “A Christmas Concert: Downeast Brass with Jay Zoller, Organist” on Sunday, December 20, 2015, 2PM at the South Parish Congregational Church, 9 Church Street, Augusta.

For years South Parish Congregational Church and its fine organist, Jay Zoller, have shared their magnificent organ with the public in a special holiday concert featuring the Downeast Brass Quintet.  For the past few years, Concerts at Jewett has been happy to join them in co-sponsoring this event.

Mr. Zoller plays the historic 1866 E. & G. G. Hook Organ for services and concerts.  He comes to South Parish with long experience in church music and recital playing.

The Downeast Brass has performed in many New England settings.  Audiences have enjoyed these fine Maine performers on the concert stage, at weddings, festivals, and on parade.  Their wide range of musical styles makes them the preferred musical choice for many occasions.

Tickets are $10, students $5, 12 & under free.  Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop, and at the door.  Call 621-3551, or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or mail order tickets.  Website: www.concertsatjewett.com

Next concert:  Sunday, January 24, 2016, 2PM – The Gawler Family with Jessie and Greg Boardman

 

Admission to all UMA Jazz (and more) Week concerts is free.  No tickets or reservations are required.

UMA Jazz (and more) Week

Dec. 2nd – 5th
7:00PM each evening

Jewett Hall Auditorium

The University of Maine at Augusta presents UMA Jazz (and more) Week, Wednesday, Dec. 2 through Saturday, December 5, 2015 at All 7:00 p.m. each evening in Jewett Hall Auditorium–University of Maine at Augusta.

Each fall and spring semester, the Jazz and Contemporary Music Program of UMA hosts a week of superb concerts featuring both student and faculty performers. The four nights of performances are the semester culmination of the UMA Music Program.

Admission to all UMA Jazz (and more) Week concerts is free.  No tickets or reservations are required. The full calendar of events includes the following ensemble performances:

  • Wednesday, Dec. 2, 7:00 pm:
    Progressive Rock Ensemble – Scott Hughes, Dir.
    Live Stream Link »
  • Thursday, Dec. 3, 7:00 pm:
    Theater of the Mind – Noah Cole, Dir.
    Live Stream Link »
  • Friday, Dec. 4, 7:00 pm:
    The Jazzmanian Devils – Pamela Jenkins, Dir.
    Sassquatch (R&B/Rock/Jazz Fusion) – UMA Music Alumni
    Live Stream Link »
  • Saturday, Dec. 5 , 7:00 pm:
    Envok (Jazz vocal ensemble) – Marcia Gallagher, Dir
    Jazz On Tour – Pamela Jenkins, Dir.
    Live Stream Link »

For further information please call (207) 621-3286.

2016 veterans badgesThe University of Maine at Augusta today announced that it as been designated a 2016 Military Friendly School by G.I. Jobs Magazine, named in Military Times Best for Vets: Colleges 2016 rankings, and selected as a Top School in the 2016 Military Advanced Education & Transition Guide to Colleges & Universities research study, which will be published next month.

This is the 6th year that GI Jobs has named UMA in its Military Friendly Schools list, the fourth year that Military Times has listed UMA as a Best for Vets College, and the third year that Military Advanced Education has ranked UMA as a Top College and University.

Earlier this year, U.S. News & World Reports also selected UMA in its national ranking of universities that have the Best Online Bachelor’s Programs for Veterans. UMA is the only university in Maine that was ranked in the list.

Rankings include factors such as military support services both online and on campus for service members, military veterans and their families, graduation and employment outcomes and success rates, military culture, financial aid, and flexibility.

Among the support UMA offers veterans includes a peer mentor program, veteran’s lounges, as well as admissions and advising staff, many of whom are veterans themselves, that are trained to help veteran and military students translate specialized military credit and/or other previously earned credits into a college major at UMA.

Since its founding in 1965 when a simple “Welcome Veterans” sign encouraged Vietnam-era Veterans to enroll, UMA has continued a rich tradition of supporting military-experienced students with a steady increase in veteran students and graduates over the years.

For more information about UMA’s Veterans Program visit: uma.edu/veterans.

Collection of images from The Sign Project student art exhibitThe Sign Project” showcases the creative work of students from Cony High School and the University of Maine at Augusta as they address issues of bias in an exhibit at the Holocaust and Human Rights Center (HHRC) of Maine from November 15th – 30th. An opening reception including community conversations will be held Wednesday, November 18th at 4pm.

“The Sign Project” is part of a course offered by UMA through a dual enrollment program, which allows Cony High students to earn high school and UMA college credit at the same time.

Part one of the two part project is a collection of photographs of local residents, each holding up a large poster that answers the question, “what does hate look like?” UMA and Cony high school students worked together to find, interview and photograph the community members in hopes of addressing issues of hate and violence locally and globally.

During part two of the project, Cony High School students plan to take the dialogue back into their school, and during the upcoming year brainstorm solutions to the issues that their community members raised. They will then be photographed with their written solutions in the same artistic style.

A collaboration between the HHRC, the Family Violence Project of Maine and UMA, the current photograph exhibit can be seen in the atrium gallery of the HHRC located at Michel Klahr Center on the Augusta campus of the University of Maine at Augusta, the gallery is open Monday through Friday from 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM.

 

Last weekend nine students represented UMA’s food security efforts in Orono for The Maine Hunger Dialogue.

The Maine Hunger Dialogue is part of a national Dialogue movement to raise awareness of hunger on every higher education campus in the country. The Maine Dialogue is about more than dialoguing; it is about action. Specifically, it is about providing the inspiration, expertise, and resources needed for student teams and individuals at higher-education institutions across Maine to plan, create, and ultimately execute a hunger-based project.

The UMA representatives from both campuses hope to address hunger by eventually providing an on-campus food pantry for students at each campus. A similar project at San Diego City College is highlighted here: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2010/05/among-dorms-and-dining-halls-hidden-hunger/39766/

Other efforts at UMA to address hunger have included a multitude of successful food drives, a mini-grant project which produced a cookbook for students on a budget and will also feature an “under $10” cooking workshop, and the bi-annual Good Shepherd Food Mobile food distribution which has given away 1,300 lbs of food to those in need.

In addition, UMA has traditionally grown and donated upwards of 1,000 pounds of fresh organic vegetables from its Augusta campus Community Garden to the Augusta Food Bank. The bank provides supplemental food to over 1,000 individuals in the Augusta area. Next semester UMA is offering a Community Garden course, Cultivating Community (SSC 334), which will focus on making the garden a fully sustainable student run operation that continues to serve the community for years to come.

For more information about UMA’s participation in the Maine Hunger Dialogue conference contact Colleen Coffey at 262-7900. For information about the UMA Community Garden Course, Cultivating Community (SSC 334) contact James Cook, 621-3190, james.m.cook@maine.edu or Dr. Kati Corlew, 207-262-7752, kate.corlew@maine.edu.

The Easy Happy Show membersThe “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College will feature The Easy Happy Show with Marcia Gallagher and Katie Daggett on Sunday, November 8, 2015, 2PM at UMA Jewett Hall Auditorium.

The Easy Happy Show is the creation of Hallowell-based musicians Marcia Gallagher and Katie Daggett who were originally students together in the UMA music program. Marcia’s love of jazz and Katie’s strong folk influence complement each other in songs from their years in the music business.  Their light-hearted banter added to their large repertoire will leave you tapping your toes and smiling.

Tickets are $10, students $5, 12 & under free. Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, Dave’s Appliance in Winthrop and at the door. Call 621-3551, or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or for mail order tickets.

The next concert is Sunday, December 20, 2015, 2PM at South Parish Congregational Church in Augusta – A Christmas Concert with Downeast Brass and Jay Zoller, organist.

www.concertsatjewett.com

Media contact:
Irene Forster
445-5227
iforster@fairpoint.net

Sandcastle girls flyerNovember 10, 2015, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Fireplace Lounge, Randall Student Center

NY Times bestselling novelist Chris Bohjalian will deliver a lunchtime lecture on his novel Sandcastle Girls and the topic of the Armenian Genocide this Tuesday, November 10 from 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm in the Fireplace Lounge, Randall Student Center at the University of Maine at Augusta.

Bohjalian is the author of 18 books, most of which were New York Times bestsellers. His work has been translated into over 30 languages and three times become movies. Among the many awards he has received is the ANCA Freedom Award for his work educating Americans about the Armenian Genocide.

This event is free and open to the public, and is made possible by the UMA Cultural Events Committee and a UMA Presidential Mini-Grant for English Professor Lisa Botshon.

In honor of Veterans Day and UMA’s 50th Anniversary, UMA will host a 50th Anniversary Veteran Recognition event on Tuesday, November 10th from 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm in the Fireplace Lounge of the Randall Student Center with special guest, First Lady Ann LePage.

With many local veterans and their families including UMA students and community members expected to attend, the event will honor and thank veterans for their service and recognize UMA’s rich tradition of supporting military-experienced students.

Beginning with the parading of the Colors by the Kennebec County Veterans Honor Guard and the singing of the National Anthem by Nathaniel Grace, Maine National Guard Chaplain Andrew Gibson will deliver the Invocation.

Following the opening ceremony, military and veterans will be recognized by UMA President Rebecca Wyke, Maine’s Director of the Bureau of Veterans’ Services Adria Horn, and First Lady Ann LePage.

Immediately following will be a reception for all guests, which will include light refreshments and hors d’oeuvres.

To RSVP visit: uma.edu/veteranrsvp

Sign at Oct-Dec UMA Arch ExhibitArchitects: On the Inside
Charles Danforth Gallery
October 28th  – December 8th
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The University of Maine at Augusta Charles Danforth Gallery is displaying a new exhibit, Architects: On the Inside, from October 28th through December 8th. There will be a reception and artist talk on Thursday, November 12 at 4:30pm.

“Who are the professors and instructors teaching in UMA’s Bachelor of Architecture program? What do they do that supports their creative lives and professions as architects?” asked Karen Adrienne, UMA Danforth Gallery Director. “These are some of the questions that came to mind while working with this outstanding faculty,” she added.

Architects: On the Inside is a collaboration of creative work by UMA Architecture faculty members, Eric Stark, Amy Hinkley, and Rosie Curtis with support from, Roger Richmond, Jessie Carroll, Michael Belleau and Toby Gabranski among others. The exhibit consists of drawings, paintings, and sculptures that inspire, enrich, and compliment their work as professional architects and architecture faculty members at UMA.

For more information about the exhibit visit: http://www.artsuma.com/. You can see images of the exhibit on the Danforth Gallery Flickr Page, or on the Danforth Gallery Facebook page.

UMA’s Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.) program, the only professional architecture degree in Maine, is a small, integrated, hands on program that inspires students through community engagement, collaborative coursework and essential design elements. For more information about the program visit: uma.edu/BArch.

The Charles Danforth Gallery is located in Jewett Hall on UMA’s Augusta campus. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday from 9:00am to 5:00pm and on Friday from 9:00am to 3:00pm.

Image of Archetecture exhibit in Danforth

Nationally recognized poets who contributed to the book, The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop, will visit UMA’s Augusta and Bangor campuses on October 27th and 28th to perform, discuss and teach participants about hip-hop’s poetry traditions combined with the richness and diversity of American poetry.

The poets will be on the Bangor campus on Tuesday, October 27th where they will conduct a poetry-writing workshop from 3:00 to 4:30pm and then participate in an open mic and panel discussion from 5:00pm to 6:30pm, both in Eastport Hall room 124.

The next day the poets will be on the Augusta campus, Wednesday, October 28th where they will perform and conduct a workshop and discussion from 12:00 – 1:00pm in the Michael Klahr Center, lunch will be provided.

Visiting poets include Kevin Coval, one of the editors of The BreakBeat Poets. Coval is also the Artistic Director of Young Chicago Authors, and creator of the Chicago Youth Poetry Festival, the world’s largest youth poetry festival.

With Coval will be contributing BreakBeat poets, Jose Olivarez, a nationally recognized poet, educator, and activist from Calumet City, Illinois and Safia Ehillo, a poet and poetry editor from Sudanese who currently lives in New York City where she is a poetry editor for Kinfolks Quarterly and pursues an MFA at the New School.

All performances, open-mics and workshops are free and open to the public. Students, faculty, staff and community members are encouraged and welcome to attend and participate.

Forum on the Future LogoA public forum entitled, “What Is Broad Band Internet Access and Why Should We Care?” will take place Sunday, November 1st at the University of Maine at Augusta(UMA) in Jewett Auditorium at UMA, 2:00 PM – 4:00

Sponsored by UMA Senior College (UMASC) and the College of Arts and Sciences, the forum will present as keynote speaker Ralph Johnson, a member of the ConnectME Authority, who will discuss why improving high-speed, or “broad band” internet is vital for the economy of Maine and how it could help to enhance the lives of older people by improving access to health care and enabling them to socialize and keep in touch with friends and relatives.

Maine lags behind almost every other state in the nation in the development of broadband internet access.  Yet it is essential to attract telecommuters – a creative and rapidly growing sector of the working population – to live here.  Because telephone companies are reluctant to invest in low-populated rural areas, a public-private coalition will be necessary to establish a system.  A proposal for a bond measure to support broadband internet access, originally intended to be on the ballot this November, was held over for refinement in the upcoming legislative session.

Johnson, with extensive experience as top information officer for several major health facilities, will explain, in terms understandable to all of  us,  the significance of broad band and and ways in which it might work.  He will also focus on how broad band can help us keep in touch with family and can also have an impact on keeping us healthy.

Joining Mr. Johnson on a panel are Dick Thompson, Chief Information Officer of the University of Maine System, who will talk about the application of the internet access to education, and  Peggy Schaffer, Vice Chair of the Maine Broad Band Coalition, who will address the importance of broad band  for Maine businesses to compete in the world marketplace.

UMASC Forums are Free and open to the public.  Refreshments are served during a brief break, followed by a question and answer period. For more information about concerts, forums, classes and other activities contact us at 621-3551 or umasc@maine.edu.

Ralph Johnson

Ralph Johnson

Peggy Schaffer

Peggy Schaffer

Dick Thompson

Dick Thompson

 

 

 

The remaining presidential finalist, Dr Lawrence Gould, will be visiting our campuses Thursday, October 8th through Friday, October 9th. Further details about his visit are below (including an updated live stream link for Dr. Gould’s first open forum event on 10/8 from 10-11:30am).

In the past two weeks we have been visited by Dr. Guiyou Huang and Dr. James Conneely. If you have not already done so, you can give your feedback about each candidate online:

Any additional updates, and detailed information about each the candidates can be found on the UMA Presidential Search Webpage.

Dr. Lawrence Gould


Thursday, October 8th:

Friday, October 9th:

  • 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
    • In person in 124 Eastport Hall, Bangor campus
  • 2:30 –  3:50 pm
    • In person in Bath Brunswick Center room 115
    • PolyCom to other centers: Bath 115, East Mill PC 1, Ellsworth 7, Houlton 136, South Paris 114, Rockland 412, Rumford 4, Saco 110, UMA Alumni Conference Room, UMA Bangor Lewiston Hall 110

During each event the e-mail address for questions will be: umapresidentsearch@maine.edu

Survey feedback link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/UMA_L_Gould

*This live stream works with Windows and Macintosh computers and laptops, and some mobile devices, such as iPads and Android devices.  If using a mobile device, when prompted, choose to view the stream in a “browser” and not the “Panopto App”.  If it does not work it means that our streaming platform does not currently support your device. 

 

Fiddle-icious

Cony High School Viles Auditorium Augusta
Sunday, October 18, 2015, 2PM

Fiddle-icious in concertThe “Concerts at Jewett” Series sponsored by University of Maine at Augusta College of Arts and Sciences and UMA Senior College will feature Fiddle-icious on Sunday, October 18, 2015, 2PM at Cony High School Viles Auditorium, 60 Pierce Drive, Augusta, Maine.

Fiddle-icious is comprised of a diverse group of enthusiastic fiddlers and other musicians of all ages and walks of life with members from Kittery to Augusta. Their music comes from the Irish, Scottish, Quebecois and Acadian traditions and includes reels, jigs, marches, hornpipes, waltzes, step-dancing and singing.

Fiddle-icious is directed by Don Roy, a designated Master Fiddler from Gorham, considered a “living cultural treasure” here in Maine. Both Don and his wife Cindy are committed to keeping Maine’s musical heritage alive with this non-profit, all volunteer community organization.

Tickets are $10, students $5, 12 & under free. Tickets are available at Pat’s Pizza in Augusta, and at the door. Call 621-3551, or email umasc@maine.edu for more information or for mail order tickets.

Website: www.concertsatjewett.com

The next concert is Sunday, November 8, 2015, 2PM – The Easy Happy Show with Marcia Gallagher and Katie Daggett.

Media contact:
Irene Forster
445-5227
iforster@fairpoint.net

Decisions for End of Life Care; Is Assisted Dying an Option?

The UMA Senior College (UMASC) is hosting a public forum, “Decisions for End of Life Care; Is Assisted Dying on Option?” will be held at UMA’s Jewett Auditorium on Sunday, September 27th from 2:00pm – 4:00pm in the afternoon.

When it comes to dying we can just let nature take its course or we can be proactive in deciding how we want to be treated in our final days. Whether that is using medicine to extend our lives or just wanting comfort care. In some states, such as Oregon, Washington and Vermont, terminally ill people can legally request medical assistance in dying.

A proposal was offered in the last session of the Maine Legislature to permit physicians, under certain restrictions and safeguards, to prescribe medications, which would allow patients with a terminal illness to take their own lives.  Such actions presumably would enable patients to determine the time and place of their own death. Though the law did not pass, the issue is still alive.

Thomas Keating

Thomas Keating

Roger Katz

Roger Katz

Tom Feagin

Tom Feagin

The forum will be oriented toward giving a broad overview of late-life treatment decisions, and suggest how to view assisted dying within that context.  Speakers will be Thomas Feagin, M.D. retired physician, hospice care director and medical ethics specialist, who will present an overall view of the end of life process and  the medical profession’s role related to it. Thomas Keating, M. D. hematologist, oncologist and advocate for palliative and hospice care. Dr. Keating will clarify distinctions between curative, palliative and hospice care. The third speaker will be attorney and State Senator Roger Katz. Though Sen. Katz sponsored the assisted dying proposal in the recent legislative session, he will present a non-partisan view of the issue from all its many perspectives, including ethical, religious, political and civil rights.

The forum is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served during a short break.

UMASC is open to all who are 50 years of age and older, their partners and spouses.  For further information about current courses and other activities, please contact us at 621-3551, email us at umasc@maine.edu or view our website at www.uma.edu.

 

Maine Artists engages Hurricane Katrina experience through graphic storytelling

Graphy Storytelling Artwork by Professor PrecourtThe Danforth Gallery at UMA opens its 2015-2016 season with “My Katrina Chronicles” by Peter Precourt, Associate Professor of Art at UMA.

As our nation commemorates the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina which devastated the Gulf Coast in 2005, “My Katrina Chronicles: Chapters: III and IV,” places the viewer inside the event in an installed, hand-painted, graphic story.  The exhibition will run from September 8 through October 16, 2015.

In anticipation of Hurricane Katrina’s arrival, Precourt and his family fled to the Georgia Mountains from the Gulf coast of Mississippi. It is here that the story line continues as the artist contemplates if fate or karma has led him to current predicament. Precourt pieces together memories in a compelling visual story which he describes as hovering “somewhere between a graphic novel, a journal entry, a painting, a memoir and a flippant conversation.”

Much like the debris that filled the landscape in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Precourt incorporates a variety of materials in his visuals including Sharpie, sumi-e, acrylic and encaustic, Mylar and rice paper. The images are created, says Precourt, to “openly engage the imperfection of memory, the possibility of change and the restorative power of storytelling.”

Learn more about Peter Precourt and this compelling work at the Artist’s Talk/Reception on Wednesday, September 23rd from 4:30pm-5:30pm at the Danforth Gallery. In addition, the Danforth Gallery will host an “Artist Panel: the interdisciplinary nature of the graphic novel” featuring Peter Precourt, Lisa Botshon and Ted Closson on Thursday, September 17th from 11:45am – 12:45pm. The Danforth Gallery is located in Jewett Hall at the University of Maine Augusta campus and is open Monday-Thursday, 9:00am-5:00pm. and Friday, 9:00am-4:00pm. For more information, visit www.ArtsUMA.com.

Program:

WELCOME
President Rebecca Wyke, Ed.D.

ACADEMIC RECOGNITION
Provost Joe Szakas

Rising Scholar Introductions

Distinguished Educator Award
Thomas Giordano
Associate Professor of Accounting

Distinguished Scholar Award
Richard Nelson
Professor of Music

INTERDISCIPLINARITY
UMA’S Academic Theme 2015-2016

Framing The Theme
Sarah Hentges
Associate Professor of American Studies

Perspectives on the Theme
Kati Corlew
Assistant Professor Of Psychology

Brad O’Brien ‘17
Liberal Studies Major

Keynote Address
Elizabeth Duclos-Orsello, Ph.D.
Associate Professor,
Department of Interdisciplinary Studies
Salem State University

September 18th Convocation Ceremony will celebrate UMA’s 50th anniversary and kick off UMA’s Academic Theme, Interdisciplinarity.

 

Convocation Puzzle image

Friday, September 18th
3:30PM – 5:00PM
Campus Green

(Jewett Auditorium, if rain)

We are arranging a free shuttle from the Bangor Campus to the Augusta campus for Convocation for more info contact keikomarie.riendeau@maine.edu

The University of Maine at Augusta will hold its annual Convocation ceremony on Friday, September 18th from 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM outdoors on the Augusta Campus Green.

This year’s ceremony will celebrate UMA’s 50th anniversary and launch the 2015/2016 academic theme, “Interdisciplinarity.” An emerging area of study at UMA, this year’s theme will be the focus of several events throughout the year and be woven into course curricula across many academic disciplines.
The ceremony will open with a colorful Processional that includes UMA faculty members dressed in formal academic regalia joined by faculty nominated, student Rising Scholars.

This year’s keynote speaker, Elizabeth Duclos-Orsello is an Associate Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at Salem State University in Salem, Massachusetts. In addition to her faculty position at Salem State, Duclos-Orsello also coordinates the American Studies concentration, is a Faculty Fellow for Service-Learning, and is also an affiliated faculty member with the Center for Economic Development and Sustainability. Her research and teaching interests explore questions of social justice, issues of identity-formation and struggles for voice and power.

Convocation will also feature perspectives on the academic theme from UMA Liberal Studies Major, Brad O’Brien ‘17, Associate Professor of American Studies, Sarah Hentges, and Assistant Professor of Psychology, Kati Corlew.

In addition, Thomas Giordano, UMA Associate Professor of Accounting will be receiving UMA’s Distinguished Educator Award, and Richard Nelson UMA Professor of Music will be receiving UMA’s Distinguished Scholar Award.

Convocation is free and open to the public. In the event of inclement weather, the program will take place in Jewett Auditorium.

For more information visit: http://www.uma.edu/about/convocation/

Through a collaborative effort with the Bridge Year Program, the University of Maine at Augusta will be providing over 250 Maine high school students with college credits they earn right in their own high school classrooms.

“The opportunity to complete college level coursework and get credit for it provides high school students with a real feel for what college classes are like before they actually go off to college,” said Gregory Fahy, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at UMA. “The experience also helps them make educated decisions about what career path to follow after graduation,” he added.

The Bridge program, created and coordinated by United Technologies Center (UTC), arranges UMA faculty members to work closely with high school teachers to provide juniors and seniors with the opportunity to graduate high school with up-to 24 college credit hours under their belt.

In order to earn UMA credits, offered in History, Math, English, Chemistry and Biology, students pay a significantly discounted $40 per credit hour and attend specially designed courses taught by their own teachers in their own schools or at UTC locations.

UMA faculty members provide supervision, support and guidance, including training, certification and course design. In addition, faculty members review student work and do classrooms visits.

On its second year participating in the Bridge program, UMA has significantly expanded its participation. It is now the Bridge program’s lead university in providing credits to high school students.

Participating high schools this year include Bangor High School, Brewer High School, Hampden Academy, Hermon High School, Waterville High School, Katahdin High School, Bucksport High School, Edward Little High School, Nokomis Regional High School, Foxcroft Academy, Schenck High School, Medomak Valley High School, Ellsworth High School, Houlton High School, Southern Aroostock Community School, Hodgdon High School and East Grand High School.

Deep River Album CoverGuitarist/Composer Richard Nelson Celebrates New CD Deep River. A Suite For Boston’s Adventurous Aardvark Jazz Orchestra.

“An ambitious and daring composer” – All About Jazz

“Aardvark is a powerful band capable of raising the roof of any venue.” – Downtown Music Gallery (NYC)

Guitarist/composer Richard Nelson and the Aardvark Jazz Orchestra join forces on Saturday, September 12 at Studzinski Recital Hall, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, to celebrate the release of Nelson’s new CD Deep River as well as Aardvark’s 43rd season.  The program, titled Jazz Americana, includes Deep River, a jazz suite Nelson composed for the Orchestra, and additionally pays tribute to the resilient city of New Orleans a decade after hurricane Katrina with two staples from the Crescent City arranged by Mark Harvey:  Down by the Riverside and St. James Infirmary Blues (made famous by Louis Armstrong).   Aardvark also marks the Billy Strayhorn centennial with his classic Chelsea Bridge.  Admission for the 7:30 show is free.  For more information, call (207) 725-3747.

Professor Richard NelsonOver the past quarter century Nelson has established a reputation as a versatile, imaginative player and consummate composer in both jazz and new music settings.  Deep River is a singular jazz suite that reimagines and reclaims early 20th century American roots music.  In collaboration with Mark Harvey’s Aardvark Jazz Orchestra, the inveterately inventive Boston ensemble in which Nelson has performed since the late 1980s, the album brings a 21st century improvisational aesthetic to the unvarnished and idiosyncratic folk forms of an American republic almost lost to living memory. His fourth and most ambitious album, Deep River is slated for release by Heliotrope Records on September 8, 2015.

In many ways, Deep River builds upon Nelson’s acclaimed 2011 album Pursuit (Heliotrope Records), which features the 13-piece Maine-based Richard Nelson Large Ensemble and centers on a striking five-movement suite that artfully navigates dense, latticed harmonies. While he explores similar structural and textural concepts on Deep River, he composed the suite specifically for Aardvark, “a very established and stable group with a long and distinguished history,” Nelson says. “Mark Harvey has taken an Ellingtonian approach to leading the band and holding it together for more than 40 years, and I’m informed by that continuity myself. As with Ellington’s band, the personnel has remained remarkably consistent, and I know the group so well that I’m writing specifically for the sound of, say, Jeanne Snodgrass’s trumpet or Bob Pilkington’s trombone.”

“I’ve been engaged with music across a wide stylistic spectrum my entire life, and here he was so passionate about this particular slice of it,” Nelson says. “I was familiar with a lot of these pieces but playing them with my son meant I was living with them in a much more intense way than I would have otherwise. When the opportunity arose for me to do a large-scale piece for Aardvark, with vocalists, I saw that this was my chance to process this music through my own creative sensibility.”

For many, becoming a parent alters the experience of time, shifting one’s perspective inexorably toward the future. But for Nelson, fatherhood set him on an epic journey into the past, where he found the raw materials and inspiration for Deep River.  Nelson traces the project’s roots back about a decade, to gigs he started playing around Brunswick, Maine with his 12-year-old son Dan, who was smitten with voices found on Harry Smith’s epochal Anthology of American Folk Music.  Artists like the Carolina Tar Heels and the Carter Family, and later figures such as Woody Guthrie and Doc Watson, inspired the young man and with Richard playing lead guitar and singing backup, they developed a repertoire of blues, stomps, bluegrass, and old-time fiddle tunes and ballads. The intensity of his son’s concentration on this protean music opened a door to pieces like the Delmore Brothers’ “Deep River Blues” as interpreted by Doc Watson and Mississippi John Hurt’s beseeching rendition of “Make Me a Pallet on your Floor.”

What’s most impressive about Deep River is the way that Nelson keeps the original source recordings hovering in the background like a spectral presence while he conjures a vivid orchestral soundscape in the foreground.

The album’s opening and closing tracks are based on tunes that Nelson performed with his son. Paying close attention to the contours of the plainspoken lyrics vocalist Marcia Gallagher brings a self-possessed, almost fatalistic presence to the molasses melancholy of “Deep River Blues.” Bill Lowe’s sumptuous, rumbling tuba provides the brass heft in the transitional movement “Transit,” an ideal showcase for a jazz maestro of low-end frequencies.

In another ingenious instrumental pairing, Nelson unleashes Peter Bloom’s piquant piccolo on “Old Country Stomp,” in place of the original recording’s quills (rough-hewn panpipes), a theme that’s later echoed by the ensemble. Inspired by a 1928 recording from the Harry Smith anthology by itinerant bluesman Henry “Ragtime Texas” Thomas, who died in obscurity but became a wellspring for folk revivalists and blues rockers decades later, Nelson’s piece maintains the terpsichorean imperative of the original, with vocalist Timothy Johnson serving as the dance caller.

Nelson closes the album with “Make Me A Pallet On Your Floor,” a plaintive piece that features vocals by both Gallagher and Johnson, though the extended arrangement provides plenty of space for incisive improvisers like saxophonists Phil Scarff (on lustrous soprano) and Arni Cheatham (on searing alto). Nelson also steps forward with some beautifully calibrated guitar work, but ultimately Aardvark is his instrument. By inviting listeners into his boldly reconfigured vision of the old weird America he makes a compelling case that our nation maintains a bracing streak of strangeness.

“I can’t really say that I had a model for this work,” Nelson says. “There are of course American composers, such as Aaron Copland and Charles Ives, who have drawn on folk sources. But in reinterpreting these songs in a contemporary jazz setting I really felt like I was out there on my own. I just set about absorbing them as deeply as I could and then tried to let the material speak in a way that seemed inventive and organic.”

A Professor of Music who teaches composition and jazz improvisation at the University of Maine at Augusta, Nelson grew up in the East Bay suburbs of San Francisco. He studied music at Sonoma State and UC Berkeley, where he honed his improvisational chops in the UC Jazz Ensemble backing guest masters like Joe Henderson, John Handy, and George Duke. A few years after graduating from Cal in 1977 he headed east to study composition with Donald Erb at Indiana University (while also playing guitar in the IU Big Band directed by the great David Baker). The eastward trek continued when he made the move to New York City for doctoral work in composition at Columbia with Mario Davidovsky, while also studying with Bob Brookmeyer and Manny Albam in the BMI Jazz Composers Workshop.

Nelson made an impressive recording debut as a bandleader with the sterling 2001 trio session Figurations (Invisible Music) featuring fellow UMA colleagues Chris van Voorst van Beest on bass and Steve Grover on drums. He followed up with 2004’s Origin Story, which marked a major leap as a composer/arranger. An earthy and sophisticated quintet project focusing on his extended original compositions, the album features alto saxophonist Tim O’Dell and trumpet legend Don Stratton. He’s also distinguished himself in the world of concert music, composing both fully notated works and ones incorporating improvisation performed in concerts and at festivals across the country by such groups as Speculum Musicae, ALEA III, and the Charleston Symphony Orchestra.

Running through his entire career since settling in New England in the late 1980s is his relationship with the Aardvark Jazz Orchestra.  Founded in 1973 by trumpeter and music director Mark Harvey, the band is known for wide-ranging repertoire featuring original works by Harvey, music of Duke Ellington, and diverse concerts spanning jazz, folk, popular and classical traditions.  Across its 40-year history, Aardvark has given premieres of more than 170 works for jazz orchestra by Mark Harvey and many other composers. The group appears on twelve CDs, including seven discs from Leo Records. Over the past quarter century Nelson has contributed several pieces to the band’s book, while performing on all of their albums. A core member of the ensemble, he’s maintained his affiliation with Aardvark since moving up to Maine and considers the band to be “a vital part of my creative pursuits.” With Deep River, he’s taken Aardvark into an uncharted realm where memories mix with portents and visions. Looking backwards and forwards simultaneously, Nelson creates a dialogue where sons invite fathers into the past in order to create sounds for the future.
Aardvark is: Arni Cheatham, Peter Bloom, Phil Scarff, Chris Rakowski, Dan Zupan, Tim O’Dell/saxes and woodwinds; K.C. Dunbar, Jeanne Snodgrass/trumpets; Bob Pilkington, Anita-Ann Jerosch, Jeff Marsanskis/trombones; Bill Lowe, bass trombone/tuba; Richard Nelson/guitar; John Funkhouser/string bass; Harry Wellott/drums; Grace Hughes, vocalist; Timothy Johnson guest vocalist; Mark Harvey/trumpet, music director.

The Aardvark Jazz Orchestra is managed by Americas Musicworks, Rebecca DeLamotte, Managing Director, 29 Newbury Street, Somerville, MA 02144, Telephone 617-776-8778.  Email:  delamotte-amw@comcast.net

triosmallThe University of Maine at Augusta has been awarded close to $2.5 million from a TRIO Student Support Services (SSS) grant to support the success, retention, and graduation of 360 students annually for five years.

“We are so pleased that we were able to secure this much needed funding for the next five years,” said UMA President Rebecca Wyke. “UMA’s Cornerstone TRIO program is one of the largest in the state of Maine and has been serving our students for over 25 years. It is extremely important that we continue to provide these specific support services to students that need them,” added President Wyke.

Funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s TRIO Student Support Services (SSS) program, the grant provides first-generation, income eligible students, and/or students with identified disabilities with opportunities for academic development, assists with basic college requirements, and guides students toward the successful completion of their post-secondary education.

By supporting students through peer mentoring, academic tutoring, assistance in course selection, help with financial aid and more, UMA’s Cornerstone TRIO program has proven its success through consistently high persistence and retention rates.

“We are very grateful to continue to serve our unique student population with the support and tools needed to successfully complete their degrees,” said Cornerstone TRIO Director Dorrea Fellman.

For more information about UMA’s Cornerstone TRIO Programs, contact either the Cornerstone office in Augusta at (207) 621-3157, or in Bangor at (207) 262-7813 or visit: http://www.uma.edu/academics/student-support/cornerstone/

Vice Chancellor of Finance and Administration and UMS Treasurer Rebecca Wyke is being temporarily assigned to the Interim Presidency of the University of Maine at Augusta while a search for a new leader for UMA continues…

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UMA Announces 2015 Full and Part-Time Dean’s Lists

UMA Provost Joseph Szakas today announced the University of Maine at Augusta’s 2015 Spring Full-Time Dean’s list and the Fall 2014/Spring 2015 Part-Time Dean’s List. The Full-Time Dean’s list is issued once a semester and the Part-Time Dean’s list is issued once a year. See the requirements for each list »

 

Spring 2015 Full-Time Dean’s List

Androscoggin

Haldon Bernard, Livermore; Brian Boggs, Auburn; Angelica Bulgin, Lisbon; Paul Cote, Auburn; Miranda Dixon, Lewiston; Grace Dube, Lisbon; Jon Dupee, Mechanic Falls; Jennifer Fusco, Turner; Subhecchya Ghimire, Auburn; Michael Hebert, Livermore Falls; Timothy Holbrook, Lisbon Falls; Cherise Letourneau, Auburn; Joshua Martin, Sabattus; Asiah McClain, Lisbon; Timothy Myers, Auburn; Zackery Pomerleau, Auburn; Janet Pottle, Livermore Falls; Danielle Wadsworth, Lewiston; Nicholas Whitmore, Lewiston; Thomas Wrobel, Lisbon Falls

Aroostook

Morgan Albert-Denbow, Houlton; Casey Barton, Cary Plt; Jessica Chasse, Connor Twp; Zachary Davis, Washburn; Dawn Denbow, Houlton; Paige Doyen, Mapleton; Ashley Drinkall, Caribou; Bethany Cheyenne Goldsmith-Nichols, Monticello; Ashley Grass, Houlton; Haley Lizotte, Van Buren; Olivia Nickerson, Houlton; Jolynn Stevens, Hodgdon

Cumberland

Elizabeth Alvarez, Westbrook; Dorie Barnes, Harpswell; Marc Belley, Yarmouth; Laura Brooks, Yarmouth; Chad Ceccarini, Brunswick; Ryan Davis, Brunswick; Molly Eames, Brunswick; Haley Ellis, Durham; Amy Feeley, Brunswick; Kaija Fellman, Brunswick; Averi Lewis, Raymond; Mandy Merrill, Brunswick; Garrett Murray, Westbrook; Sabrina Newcomb, Sebago; Leon Perrin, North Yarmouth; Lindsi Shumate, S Portland; Abbey Slinker, Portland; Stephanie Whittingham, Harpswell

Franklin

Benjamin Bailey, Farmington; Jillian Bellfleur, Wilton; Patrick Carlton, Wilton; Amy Da Costa, Wilton; Corinne Dingley, Farmington; Brianna Farrington, Jay; Kerrieann Harrison, East Dixfield; Elizabeth Hebert, Chesterville; Jessica Howard, Freeman Twp; Laura Hutchins, Chesterville; Brittany Lee, Wilton; Edward Walsh, Jay; Joyce Walsh, Jay

Hancock

Deborah Briggs, Gouldsboro; Jessica Butler, Ellsworth; Susan Closson, Lamoine; Eric Davis, Bucksport; Nathan Eisworth, Franklin; Casi Farrar, Bar Harbor; Kimberly Gray, Bucksport; Christine Harden, Hancock; Katie Haskell, Stonington; Stacey Herrick, Mariaville; Keisha Kelliher, Swans Island; Tammy Marston, Bucksport; Kyle Munn, Ellsworth; Molly Orcutt, Orland; Shelagh Pappas, Lamoine; Carlos Rosales, Lamoine; Colleen Sargent, Trenton; Kathy Shields, Bar Harbor; Patrick Skeate, Hulls Cove; Carly Spear, Ellsworth; Anna Stockman, Southwest Harbor; Megan Tripler, Swans Island; Harlee Webber, Eastbrook

Kennebec

Jacob Allen, Augusta; Alyssa Ames, Kents Hill; Aaron Bagley, Oakland; Maryanne Barrows, Clinton; Eric Berg, Mount Vernon; Brianna Bernier, Rome; Bradley Bickford, Belgrade; Joshua Bonney, Waterville; Carmen Bragg, Augusta; Andrew Breault, South China; Hannah Bridges, South China; Brooke Brochu, Pittston; Chad Bryant, Winthrop; Rosemary Bryant, Monmouth; Amy Burbank-Rollins, Augusta; Sara Burd, Augusta; David Burden, Augusta; Zackary Busmanis, South China; Joshua Carrier, Augusta; Jessica Casey, Litchfield; Patrick Caskin, Litchfield; Victoria Chamberlain, Winthrop; Matthew Clark, Albion; Robert Condon, Gardiner; Jasmine Cook, Monmouth; Ann Cookson, Farmingdale; Richard Cormier, Belgrade; Christopher Daggett, Chelsea; Katelynn Denis, Waterville; Richard Dorr, Augusta; Kathryn Dutton, Augusta; Nicole Elliott, Randolph; Dray Emerson, Waterville; Michael Emerson, Augusta; Joseph Emery, Winthrop; Nathan Fellows, Augusta; Jordan Fitch, South China; Robert Foss, Augusta; Paul Fowler, Gardiner; Richard Frappier, Winslow; Heather Freeman, Winslow; Ari Gabrion, Hallowell; Jennie Gendreau, Monmouth; Carla Giuka, Augusta; Baileigh Gosselin, South China; Scott Gress, Hallowell; Christopher Hall, Augusta; Jeanne Hanson, South China; Corey Harris, Augusta; Sarah Harris, Hallowell; Ashley Healey, Gardiner; Ruth Henderson, Chelsea; Michael Hollander, South China; Jamie Jellison, Augusta; Jay Joslyn, Augusta; Megan Kenyon, Gardiner; Nicholas Kimball, Chelsea; Erika King, North Vassalboro; Elizabeth Knight, Manchester; Rayna Knight, Augusta; Courtney Koller, Clinton; Amy LaBossiere, Litchfield; Autumn Lagasse, Augusta; Jonathon Lawrence, Readfield; Abby Leach, Augusta; Sherri Lecrone, Waterville; Mary Margaret Libby, Augusta; James Longfellow, Windsor; Heather Lyon, Augusta; Charlotte MacDonald, West Gardiner; Jonathon Markham, Farmingdale; Allizah Mason, Windsor; Megan McGrother, Litchfield; Hannah McLaughlin, Manchester; Alex McMullen, Waterville; Hannah Mercier, Gardiner; Jeffrey Mercier, Gardiner; Lynn Merrill, Augusta; Alexander Miller, Sidney; Jennifer Moody, Monmouth; Mariah Moore, Gardiner; Janet Morang, Belgrade; Doreen Morgan, Augusta; Kristine Morse, Windsor; Lucas Mosher, Hallowell; Kelly Murphy, Augusta; Courtney Oliver, Monmouth; Philippe Patenaude, Augusta; Lauren Pelletier, Belgrade Lakes; Moriah Pinkham, Winslow; Courtney Porter, Augusta; Jacob Quimby, Augusta; Jonn Raymond, Waterville; Jacob Roddy, Belgrade; Michelle Roderick, Winslow; Kendrick Rogers, Augusta; Anthony Rutherford, Farmingdale; Eric Sander, Fairfield; Victoria Saxon, Randolph; Joshua Simms, Belgrade; Emily Smithson, China; Ryan Soucie, Augusta; Matthew St Jarre, Randolph; Alex Stetkis, Augusta; Meghan Stetson-Bartlett, Augusta; Tara Stevens, Winthrop; Nicholas Stiles, Augusta; Julia Taylor, Hallowell; Denise Terrell, Gardiner; Koriana Thompson, Waterville; Jonathan Tracy, Winslow; Matthew Waterman, N Monmouth; Ashley Whittemore, Benton; Taylor Wilbur, Manchester; Jared Wilkinson, Augusta; Tina Willette, Winslow; Christina Williams, Gardiner; Ashley Wing, Waterville; Timothy Wing, Waterville; Rebecca Winter, Sidney

Knox

Rebekah Anderson, Rockport; Chandler Barter, Friendship; Elizabeth Brown, Rockland; Megan Bruns, Camden; Jacqueline Campbell, Rockport; Lynnette Chase, Thomaston; Lawrence Cyr, Warren; Jennifer Delano, Friendship; Jennifer Dostie-Stewart, Rockland; Kendall Espinosa, Camden; Ryan Gass, Camden; Andrea Isaacs, Thomaston; Erik Jackson, Rockland; Tabbitha Johnston, Cushing; Molly Kelley, Appleton; Holly Leuning, Owls Head; Ronald Lewis, Warren; Douglas Lord, Camden; Brenna McAfee, Union; Denita McWilliams, Thomaston; Joan Mitchell, Rockland; Luke Myers, Rockland; Michael Norton, Rockland; Heather Pangakis, Appleton; Robert Paradis, Thomaston; Michaela Poor, Cushing; Stephanie Ross, Friendship; Carrie Sachse, Rockland; Erica Smith, Rockport; Melissa Sullivan-Fortuna, Rockland; Carla Taggart, Camden; Barbara Toler, Camden; Christina Torres-York, Warren

Lincoln

Courtney Alexander, Whitefield; Teresa Brooks, Waldoboro; Jessica Buzzell, Jefferson; Jamia Dufour, Jefferson; Peter Hartung, Jefferson; Maranda Hatch, Newcastle; Rachel King, Boothbay Harbor; Matthew Knight, Jefferson; Zachary Lane, Nobleboro; Leslie Lorentzen, Waldoboro; Lukin Manetti, Bristol; Christine McCormick, Whitefield; Zachary Melvin, Waldoboro; Angela Musto, Dresden; Clara Poland, Round Pond; Brittany Shorey, Whitefield; Nicole Taylor, Wiscasset; Kristine Wagstaff, Waldoboro; Kelly Young, Waldoboro

Oxford

Sheila Albanesi, Rumford; Heather Burgess, Mexico; Kim Cocca, Rumford; Kelley Evtushek, Norway; Timothy Fogg, South Paris; Naomi Foster, South Paris; Sue Frost, Dixfield; Laurie Hanscom Harmon, Albany Twp; Raymond Heikkinen, Norway; Dawna Kazregis, Peru; Brittany Kesseli, Bryant Pond; Maria Laughton, Buckfield; Tara Lunney, Bethel; Dori Lynn, Norway; Carisa Miner, Denmark; Denielle Richard, Mexico; Alishia Sessions-Liberty, Norway; Tia Sprague, Bethel; Erica Stevens, Sumner; Benjamin Stoodley, Hartford; Kyle Straiton, South Paris; Martha Thompson, West Paris; McKenzie Turner, S Paris; Lisa Worthley, Rumford; Teresa York, Rumford; Marianne Young, Carthage

Penobscot

Jocelyn Acheson, Bangor; Emily Adams, Hermon; Jennifer Alley, Hermon; Justin Ambrose, Brewer; Lance Ambrose, Hampden; Alisha Arsenault, Long A Twp; Megan Babb, Old Town; Emilee Bachelder, Bangor; Kelsey Best, Bangor; Angela Bickford, Bangor; Ashleigh Blake, Millinocket; Chad Botting, Bangor; Raelene Bouchard, Orrington; Emily Boyd, Medway; Tiffany Channell, Brewer; Carly Cloukey, Bangor; Amber Clukey, Brewer; Cori Conary, Old Town; Chelsea Curran, Bangor; Teresa Daly, Levant; Danielle Davis, Bangor; Brennan Derepentigny, Levant; Christopher Dinwiddie, Hampden; Kimberly Dunham, Hampden; Heather Elderkin, Newport; Ericka England, Bangor; Susanna Fay, Bangor; Briana Field, Bangor; Emily Ford, Bangor; Suzanne Fougere, Hampden; Laurie Frisbey, Brewer; Elisia Gamlin, Bangor; Jared Gravelle, Brewer; Karl Hance, Bangor; Chelsea Hardy, Dixmont; Scott Hosier, Hudson; Jamey House, Lincoln; Jessica Howard, Bangor; Aylah Ireland, Bangor; Alyssa Keezer, Bangor; Hollis Kimball, Corinth; Erin Kinney, Bangor; Ashley Knowles, Carmel; Demetre Kopteros, Orrington; Stephanie Lamanteer, Veazie; Allyson LaPoint, Milford; Andrew Lee, Milford; Nicholas Leeman, Brewer; Emily Leonard, Orrington; Zachary Levesque, Old Town; David L’Heureux, Orono; Chelsie Libby, Old Town; Amber Love, Stetson; John Marchelletta, Etna; Joe McGowan, Bangor; Teresa McGraw, Bangor; Suzanne McLay, Old Town; Suzanna Michaud, Levant; David Moore, Newport; Marcus Murchison, Lincoln; Raymond Nason, Bangor; Brad O’Brien, Hermon; Kelli Okyere, Brewer; Brookie Pacholski, Hermon; Ashlie Page, Levant; Dwayne Parsons, Hermon; Stephanie Parsons, Hampden; Jessica Pike, Old Town; Marissa Potter, Bangor; Abigail Priest, Lincoln; Renae Quirrion, Newburgh; Jaimie Rediker, Levant; Kayla Reed, Orrington; Aaron Reynolds, Corinna; Jennifer Rice, Hermon; Christal Ryder, Glenburn; Anastasia Salls, Brewer; Tina Saucier, Bangor; April Sawyer, Old Town; Carl Segee, Medway; Richard Sereyko, Howland; Linwood Severance, Lincoln; Jessica Silliboy, Bangor; Michael Smith, Bangor; Sarah Spade, Bangor; Emily Spinney, Corinth; Jennifer Stano, Brewer; Lindsey Stevens, Bangor; Kelcey Steward, Lincoln; Loni-Lyn Stratton, Lincoln; Erica Sturrock, Brewer; Jeremy Tanis, Bangor; Richard Thorp, Holden; Melissa Troulis, Lincoln; Kelly Tufts, Bangor; Danielle Ventucci, Glenburn; Alexander Waite, East Millinocket; Stacie Wakely, Brewer; Jessica Walsh, Bangor; Hannah Wheelock, Orrington; Abigail White, Hampden; Megan Whitney, Hermon; Amanda Wilbur, Bangor; Brent Wilbur, Milford; Jeffrey Williams, Bradford; Michael Williams, Greenbush; Jana Woollard, Eddington; Daren Worcester, Orrington; Megan Young, Bradford

Piscataquis

Tucker Dow, Dover Foxcroft; Skye Hinkley, Greenville; Chelsi Martell, Dover Foxcroft; Peter McGuire, Guilford; Leah Mooers, Dover Foxcroft; Jennifer Sylvain, Dover Foxcroft; Lynn Torre, Sangerville; Lisa Archer, Phippsburg

Sagadahoc

Amanda Bridges, Bowdoinham; Matthew Carter, Richmond; Alissa Coulombe, Richmond; Nicole Crippen, Topsham; Elise Faris, Richmond; Amanda Fernald, Topsham; Christie Keller, Topsham; Abbie Kontio, Bowdoinham; Kelsey Lachance, Richmond; Cara Mia, Bath; Daniel Ouellette, Richmond; Ethan Percy, Woolwich; Danielle Plant, Bath; Jamie Plummer, Richmond; Elysia Robinson, Richmond; Benjamin Rogers, Topsham; Alyssa Rollins, Bowdoinham; Billie-Lee Sullivan, Topsham; Melissa Ward, Topsham; Katie Webster, Richmond

Somerset

Catherine Ayres, Madison; Peter Buzzard, Canaan; Danny Chambers, Harmony; Gretchen Clark, Skowhegan; Christine Conley, Skowhegan; Erica Davis, Solon; Heather Elkins, Shawmut; Andrew Higgins, Norridgewock; Jennifer Kilgore, Skowhegan; Ashley Kitchin, Detroit; Nathan Michaud, Hartland; Michael Smith, Skowhegan; Haley Strout, Cornville; Harry Ward, Detroit; Brianna Wilshusen, Hartland

Waldo

Charla Burnett, Winterport; Thomas Carter, Montville; Diane Dorcy, Winterport; Margaret Fowler, Lincolnville; Kivah Hansen, Thorndike; Weldon Henson, Belfast; Chelsea Knight, Northport; Heather Marlow, Belfast; Lydia Mather, Palermo; Carrin Pitcher, Knox; Sierra Roberts, Waldo; Danielle Rodriguez, Monroe; Chelsey Roy, Monroe; Kristina Spaulding, Knox; Jennifer Therrien, Winterport

Washington

Kimberly Carter, Princeton; Kathryn Crowley, Addison; Donna Dalangauskas, Cherryfield; Kylee Emerson, Addison; Rebecca Fletcher, Cherryfield; Amanda Moores, Calais; Alicia Roderick, Baileyville; Lisa Thompson, Trescott Twp; Katrina Wescott, Machias

York

Emma-Marie Banks, Parsonsfield; Lien Fajardo, Springvale; Carrie Fecteau, Saco; Evan Gilbert, Saco; Cheryl Killian, Biddeford; Rae-Lynn Ledoux, Sanford; Cassandra Niederer, Biddeford; Kevin Stack, Buxton; Samantha Townsend, Limington

National

Hannah Milligan, Bella Vista, AR; Chandra Stehle, Chandler, AZ; Makaela Thompson, Tucson, AZ; Bruce Engelfried, San Ramon, CA; Jeremy Huffer, Oakdale, CT; Ahmad Jawad, Tampa, FL; Jessica Alexander, Monroe, GA; Ryan Reed, Cambridge, MA; Quincy Vail, McAdam, NB; Dennis Brown, Willow Spring, NC; Joddie Ames, New Ipswich, NH; David Braunlich, Denville, NJ; Caroline Fauvel, Brooklyn, NY; Hope Sagnip, East Stroudsburg, PA; Debra Checque, San Antonio, TX; Derek David, Madison, WI

International

Virginie Saliou, Le Drenne, France; Élise Bolduc, QC, Canada

 

Fall 2014/Spring 2015 Part-Time Dean’s List

Androscoggin

Joy Crockett, Auburn; Rahma Elmi, Lewiston; Phillip Foss, Lewiston; Susan Friend, Mechanic Falls; Christopher Galasso, Mechanic Falls; Daneka LaPoint, Livermore Falls; Emily Martin, Poland; Danielle Murphy, Lewiston; Heather Pelletier, Wales; Annette Price, Mechanic Falls; Katrina Salmon, Auburn; Roseanna Waterman, Sabattus; Robert Wilcox, Sabattus

Aroostook

Gina Adams, Sherman; Patrick Blanchette, Houlton; Karla Hethcoat, Linneus; Susan Hillegass, Saint David; Debra Hopewell, Houlton; Belinda Langlois, Linneus; Kimberly McGillicuddy, Houlton; Anthony Pranses, Portage; Sasha Valcourt, Fort Kent

Cumberland

Cynthia Anthony, Brunswick; Brian Bibber, Harpswell; Shauna Breglio, Scarborough; Desire Caron, Harpswell; Jon Dow, Portland; Dustin Fairbanks, Yarmouth; Misty Foster, Harpswell; Adam Frederick, Portland; Jennifer Freeman, Center; Heather Freytag, Brunswick; Caitlin Hayward, Brunswick; Matthew Holland, Falmouth; Melissa Kapocius, Brunswick; Hannah Keaney, Westbrook; Elizabeth Kinsella, Brunswick; Pamela Maclearn, Westbrook; Pauline McCann, Casco; Keith McDonald, Bridgton; Jennifer Nicholson, Brunswick; Eric Philbrook, Gray; Edna Reid, Harpswell; Chelsea Simcock, Portland; Megan Smith, South Portland; Amy Tobalske, Gray; Adam Wallace, Freeport; Heidi Whelan, Portland; Dawne Wilcox, Bridgton; Jordanne Woodbury, Orono

Franklin

Renee Blanchet, Farmington; Kelsey Cler, New Sharon; Brad Cobb, Farmington; Skylar Crockett, Strong; Stacy Latham, Farmington; Stacy Maxham, West Farmington; Karen Reed, Farmington; Kerri Roberge, Jay; Roderick Small, Jay; Simon Thorne, Farmington

Hancock

Hannah Arseneau, Bucksport; Daniel Bradley, Orland; Gayle Chambers, Bucksport; Leeanna Conners, Ellsworth; Jeanette Cook, Ellsworth; Janice Cross, Surry; Chantelle Fitzsimmons, Ellsworth; Karla Glick, Bucksport; Nadine Goodwin, Seal Cove; Sarah Greene, Dedham; Abby Hoke, Ellsworth; Kasey Klemenz, Little Deer Isle; Stanley Kosinski, Amherst; Beverly Lamoureux, Franklin; Malerie Lockhart, Lamoine; Lynnie Lyman, Sedgwick; Robert McArthur, Ellsworth; Celeste Mittelhauser, Gouldsboro; Hannah Robbins, Blue Hill; Wesley Shepard, Amherst; Megan Staples, Bucksport; Kara Thompson, Lamoine; Jerica Whited, Dedham; Nina Zeldin, Lamoine

Kennebec

Denise Alderman, Sidney; David Allen, Chelsea; Louise Allen, Augusta; Kourtney Atwater, Windsor; Samantha Bachelder, South China; Brian Beavis, Gardiner; Ashley Bernatchez, Fairfield; Jason Bersani, Augusta; Jessica Betit, Gardiner; Rachel Blier, Gardiner; Brenda Bolduc, Winslow; Samuel Boynton, Augusta; Rebecca Bradstreet, Albion; Lori Brann, Augusta; Stephanie Brochu, Benton; Sarah Brunelle, Augusta; Lauren Bushey, Augusta; Olga Carey, Vienna; Thomas Carrothers, Rome; Colleen Carter, Winslow; Darcy Casey, Fayette; Jenna Caswell, Winslow; Patricia Chadwick-Robbins, Hallowell; Elizabeth Chamberlain, Winthrop; James Chamberlain, Waterville; Christopher Chaput, Waterville; Keith Chesley, Clinton; Roger Cookson, Farmingdale; Jamie Costa, Winthrop; Cynthia Cotnoir, Augusta; Frank Crawford, Gardiner; Jamar Croom, Waterville; Anna DeMerchant, Augusta; Jessica Demers, Belgrade; Katie Dow, China; Michael Drashcovich, Gardiner; Angela Dube, Sidney; Philip DuBois, Sidney; Monica Fallaw, Waterville; Gretchen Fehlau, Augusta; Candice Flaherty, Winslow; Christina Fogg, Augusta; Foley, Winslow; Jon Fortin, Augusta; Melissa French, Waterville; Courtney Frost, Augusta; Sarah Gardella, Sidney; Tammy Gargiulo, Augusta; Vincent Genest, Fairfield; Holly Gerard, Waterville; Daniel Gilbert, Augusta; David Giroux, Readfield; Kallie Glover, Augusta; Benjamin Godfrey, Randolph; Debbie Gosselin, Benton; Stephanie Grant, Farmingdale; Donna Griffin-Radovich, Litchfield; Danielle Guimond, Augusta; Brittany Hanson, Fairfield; Santa Havener, Augusta; Brienne Hayes, Winslow; Randall Hooper, Winthrop; Candis Howard, Gardiner; Jeri Hume-Trott, Waterville; Jenna Ibbitson, Vassalboro; Amanda Johnson, Fairfield; Stephanie Kadnar, Belgrade; Julie Kern, Oakland; Andrew King, Benton; Jennifer Laliberte, Augusta; Jarod Lawton, Farmingdale; Erin Leary, Belgrade; Irene Lee, Vassalboro; Valerie Lessard, Hallowell; Alison Lincoln-Rich, Wayne; Stephanie Love, West Gardiner; Kelly Lyon, Waterville; Roger Mackbach, Augusta; Renee Madore, Augusta; Ashley Maestre, Augusta; Evan Martin, Augusta; Michael Martin, Randolph; Shannon McLaughlin, West Gardiner; Brie-Anne Mellor, Windsor; Diane Morin, Augusta; Lisa Morin, Winslow; James Mrazik, Farmingdale; Beth Nasberg, Manchester; Jessica Needham, Oakland; Jeffrey Nicknair, Augusta; Jessica Norton, Benton; Natasha OnoFrio, Augusta; Evan Palmer, Gardiner; Holly Patton, Chelsea; Heidi Peckham, West Gardiner; India Pickett, Monmouth; Jessica Pilkington, Gardiner; Tammey Quirion, Winslow; Patricia Ranks, South Gardiner; Emily Ray, Farmingdale; April Reed, Fairfield; Stephanie Rewa, Oakland; Samantha Rhoten, Hallowell; Nicholas Roberge, Vassalboro; Glenda Robertson, Augusta; Jessica Rowe, Augusta; Shannon Roy, Winslow; Charity Shorey, Monmouth; Bonnie Smith, Gardiner; Christina Smith, Sidney; Michael Squires, Augusta; Mary Stelly, Augusta; Debra Stevens, North Monmouth; Matthew Stevens, Winthrop; Kaleigh Swasey, Waterville; Andrew Thomas, Farmingdale; Karin True, Manchester; Kevin True, Winthrop; Rebecca Turcotte, Vassalboro; Melissa Wallace, Winslow; Sarah Watson, Vassalboro; Travis Whitman, Winslow; Doris Wible, Hallowell; Shawn Willette, Winslow; Charity Williams, Gardiner; Darcy Williams, South China; Patricia Wilson, Augusta; Holly Wright, Winthrop

Knox

Kathryn Adamsky, Union; Andrew Ames, Cushing; Melissa Barez, Rockland; Catharine Bissonnette, Union; Megan Brents, Spruce Head; Nellie Burns, Rockport; Wendy Byrd, Appleton; James Christie, Rockport; April Devarney, Rockland; Jasmine Doughty, Friendship; Ashilee Embler, Warren; Pablo Espinosa, Camden; Kathy Estabrook, Rockland; Tammra Ferraiolo, Owls Head; Merideth Finley, Rockland; Chelsea Gilles, Warren; Ashley Goff, Camden; Stephanie Griffin, Camden; Douglas Hayward, Hope; Elizabeth Hendrick, Camden; Andrea Kelley, Rockland; Adam Kennedy, Cushing; Celena Kent, Warren; Craig MacIntosh, Thomaston; Brianna McClintock, Appleton; Cherri Merrifield, Union; Sierra Meservey, Hope; David Mills, Rockland; Peter Mills, Warren; Nathanael Morin, Rockland; Maureen Morse, Rockport; Christopher Nickerson, Rockland; Craig Payson, Rockport; Riley Peterson, Camden; Kimberly Reed, Warren; Bobbie Reeves, Rockport; Kathryn Rose, Warren; Nathan Roy, Warren; Lara Smith, Hope; Stephanie Sprague, Camden; Shannon Stone, Owls Head; Katelyn Taylor, Spruce Head; Lauren Taylor, Warren; Hannah Thompson, Spruce Head; Katherine Tibbetts, Thomaston; John Tooley, Camden; Merle Vanner, Washington; Olivia Vanner, Washington; Mikala Walton, Warren; Matthew Whitman, Thomaston; Debra Whittier, Camden; Brittany Willis, South Thomaston

Lincoln

Morgen Benz, Damariscotta; Jennifer Farrin, Wiscasset; Alyssa FitzGerald, Nobleboro; Brian Foote, Newcastle; Billie Grady, Whitefield; Margaret Grant, Wiscasset; Jennifer Harvey, Waldoboro; Colleen Hilt, Waldoboro; Lisa Hodgkins, Jefferson; Lisa Holbrook, Boothbay; Erica Jacobs, Waldoboro; Nicole Keating, Waldoboro; Amy Krawic, Newcastle; Nicole Mahoney, New Harbor; Madison McCarthy, Boothbay Harbor; Christian McLaughlin, South Bristol; Kim McLaughlin, Whitefield; Tammy Meserve, Edgecomb; Leslie Mooers, Wiscasset; Irene Parcher, Alna; Susan Peters, Edgecomb; Tasha Readinger, Waldoboro; John Robinson, Jefferson; Ian Shaw, Whitefield; Karen Sherlock, Wiscasset; Rachael Sloat, Boothbay; Roman Stuart, Dresden; Mary Temple, Waldoboro; Juanita Thomas, Waldoboro; Elizabeth Wild, Jefferson

Oxford

Glenn Aho, Buckfield; Erin Beedy, Mexico; Marcia Chaisson, Rumford; Nicki Cook, Oxford; Simon Elks, Rumford; Deborah Flagg, West Paris; Rachel Fogg, Woodstock; Robyn Hamilton, Bryant Pond; Rebecca Hunt, Bethel; Ashley Hutter, Hebron; Roxanne Jewell, West Paris; Howard Jones, Dixfield; Deborah Laverdiere, South Paris; Susan Manchester, South Paris; Amanda Marston, Peru; Valerie Patenaude, Hartford; Judith Pelletier, South Paris; Janet Ramey, Rumford; Stephanie Rowe, South Paris; Shelly Tripp, Peru; Robyn White, Mexico; Shayne White, Rumford; Bethany Wright, Peru

Penobscot

April Archibald, Bangor; Katrina Brittain, Mattawamkeag; Terri Brown, Milford; Velvet Brown, Bangor; Michael Carroll, Dexter; Nicole Ciulla, Lee; Dustin Corey, Bangor; Courtney Cyr, Hampden; Laurie Dow, Woodville; Keako-Marie Elliott, Garland; Christopher Florey, Brewer; Jeffrey Fuller, Bangor; Myra Gagnon, Brewer; Danielle Gendreau, Brewer; Ryan Gilbert, Old Town; Karen Golden, Lee; Jessica Goodwin, Holden; Kelly Gould, Bangor; Aaron Graham, Bangor; Danielle Gray, Bangor; Travis Gudroe, Orono; Elizabeth Hagerman, Bangor; Avery Herzog, Bangor; Jennifer Holt, Holden; Chad Houp, Hampden; Marilyn Lau, Bangor; Loree Libby, Howland; David Marley, Bangor; Sasha McBreairty, Orono; Holly Merchant, Bangor; Angel Miller, Hermon; Erin Mitchell, Howland; Kellie Moors, Carmel; Erica Murray, Brewer; Alicia Nejako, Orono; Devan Oleksyk, Eddington; Klorissa Owen, Bangor; Kathleen Pelkey, Milford; James Pettingale, Howland; Kenneth Pratt, Hampden; Kristina Pulliam, Brewer; Diane Raymond, Holden; Sara Reynolds, Glenburn; Lisa Rogers, Bangor; Adrienne Roundy, Dixmont; Penny Sands, Stillwater; Macie Schweizer, Old Town; Nathan Searles, Bangor; Victoria Sever, Orono; Ross Shaler, Bangor; Michelle Shepherd, Bangor; Jennifer Siering, Orrington; Michelle Snowman, Holden; Megan Sommers, Hampden; Connor Spencer, Old Town; Karen Sylvester, Eddington; Torrie Tardiff, Eddington; Taneale Toothaker, Orono; Christine Walsh, Brewer; Faith Wilson, Newport

Piscataquis

Pauline Eldredge, Abbot; William Eyster, Sangerville; Charles Larson, Dover Foxcroft; Jeremy Loguercio, Dover Foxcroft; Maria Mills, Brownville Junction; Dawn Pratt, Abbot; Pamela Raymond, Dover Foxcroft; Brittany Robinson, Dover Foxcroft; Sandra Sikes, Greenville; Lynette Urquhart, Dover Foxcroft; Eric Young, Guilford

Sagadahoc

Ann Marie Ater, Bath; Sue-Ellen Baxter, Bowdoinham; Susan Beauregard, Woolwich; Benjamin Brown, Bowdoinham; Susan Bryer, Bowdoinham; Sarah Coughlin, Richmond; Tonja Daye, Topsham; Nicole Doustou, Bowdoin; Candy Downs, Bath; Nancy Fredrick, Bath; Sophie Gagnon, Bath; Sean Halsey, Bowdoinham; Jerry Kiesow, Richmond; Joseph Lenentine, Bath; Ashley MacArthur, Bath; Andrea Maillet, Bath; Kevin Marshall, Richmond; Joseph Moreau, Woolwich; Darah Moshier, Bath; Danielle Namer, Woolwich; Amanda Richards, Woolwich; Dennis Sayce, Topsham; Mindy Smith, Woolwich; Kenneth Walden, Bath; Kristine Wyman, Topsham

Somerset

Dawn Baker, Canaan; Somerset Kalee Baker, Skowhegan; Somerset Melody Beaman, Madison; Somerset Angel Brewer, Norridgewock; Somerset Elizabeth Burgess, Rockwood; Somerset Tori Dyer, Cornville; Somerset Kimberly Garcia, Norridgewock; Somerset Cynthia Kennard, Madison; Somerset Tracie Lesperance, Norridgewock; Somerset Jennifer McCarthy, Norridgewock; Somerset Kim Nelson, Skowhegan; Somerset Roland Perkins, Cornville; Somerset

Waldo

Brian Baker, Lincolnville; Jennifer Bennett, Prospect; Elizabeth Bizier, Northport; Zachery Bucklin, Belfast; Gloria Burge, Searsport; Lawrence Fagan, Searsmont; Wanda Ferguson, Brooks; David Goguen, Belfast; Brittany Green, Lincolnville; Brittanie Holt, Burnham; Russell Hughes, Searsport; Duncan Kithinji, Belfast; Christopher Klenk, Stockton Springs; Renee Knowles, Belmont; Kayla Lacombe, Belmont; Holli Merry, Swanville; Jennifer Pacholski, Swanville; Kelly Pattershall, Searsport; Christopher Poulin, Stockton Springs; Travis Rowe, Searsport; Laurie Roy, Morrill; Tiffany Schofield, Thorndike; Olivia Seibel, Lincolnville; Patrick Splaine, Lincolnville

Washington

Desiree Bassett, Perry; Melina Church, Addison; Sammi Gray, Addison; Royann Lozier, Calais; Tracy Wheelden, Searsmont

York

Mark Beaudoin, Old Orchard Beach; Pamela Belisle, Old Orchard Beach; Joy Boisvert, Saco; Brenda Brault, Sanford; Karen Chasse, Dayton; Maureen Cote, Saco; Johannah Cushing, Old Orchard Beach; Katherine Hopkins, Saco; Deborah Layne, Saco; Brooke Lederer, Sanford; Heather Levasseur, Saco; Angela McEwen, Biddeford; Dionna Reynolds, Saco; Erica Sawtelle, Saco; Michele Smith, Sanford; Lacey Wakefield, Waterboro; Eugene Wood, Biddeford

National

Terry Powell, Gold Canyon, AZ; Hsiu Mei Tsai, San Gabriel, CA; Anthony Trejo, Redding, CA; Kathlene Anderson, North Branford, CT; Thomasina Hamilton, Newark, DE; Aida Marino-Smith, Interlachen, FL; Julie Landi, Fort Pierce, FL; Prairie Pasizor, Fort Pierce, FL; Lisa Lance, Panama City Beach, FL; Pamela Collins, Meridian, ID; Cynthia Carter, Burley, ID; Ryan Hanback, Sandwich, IL; Chad Snyder, Winchendon, MA; Jennifer Allen, Ossipee, NH; Shelley Price, Rochester, NH; Joseph Walker, Las Cruces, NM; Kelly Hart, Galloway, OH; Denise Malloy, Fairborn, OH; Rachael Doane, Enid, OK; Alexandria Smiley, Madras, OR; Joshua Messinger, Roslyn, PA; Cory Cookson, Spring Hill, TN; Marianna Tremaine, Bartlett, TN; Alicia Zugaro, Henrico, VA; Steven Shearer, Sterling, VA; Julie Abernathy, Torrington, WY

International

Heather Elliott, Riverview, NB, Canada; Cynthia Wenham, Roseau, Dominica; Karleen Samuel, Kolonia, Micronesia

 

Full-Time Dean’s List Requirements

To qualify for the full-time Dean’s List, students must a) complete a minimum of 12 credit hours of 100-level or higher UMA coursework (exclusive of of pass/fail courses) whose semester grade point average in these courses is 3.25 or higher, with no grade below C- in any of these courses

Part-Time Dean’s List Requirements

UMA recognizes part-time students annually by naming them to a part-time Dean’s List.  To qualify, students must a) complete a minimum of 12 credit hours of 100-level or higher UMA coursework (exclusive of pass/fail courses) during two consecutive semesters in an academic year (fall and spring); b) take no more than 11 credit hours of 100-level UMA coursework in either semester, and c) achieve a combined grade point average of 3.25 or higher over the two consecutive semesters, with no grades lower than C-.

For questions about the Dean’s Lists contact Ann Corbet in UMA’s Registrar’s Office at 207-621 3145 or annie@maine.edu.

ILS Grad Daniel NortonDaniel Norton, a student in UMA’s online Information and Library Services program, has taken his role as a student in the field very seriously. “I view it as the perfect opportunity to explore my options as a fledgling professional in environments that are conducive to turning mistakes into valuable learning experiences,” he explains.

Imagine then that his passion for exploration landed him a position at one of the most highly respected news outlets in the world, where he gained considerable experience with the collection and management of information that supports the breaking stories distributed through The New York Times’ various channels of reporting.

According to Daniel, the navigation of records, archives and databases is crucial to the integrity of news stories, and as the world continues its transition into the digital realm, the practice of verifying information has become more complex. “In the past,” says Daniel, “journalists had the opportunity to nurture relationships with clerical workers in records settings. Today, the shift to digital access has removed the human element and placed increased emphasis on search and systems proficiency. This creates the need for people fluent in navigation methods to efficiently and effectively gather the information needed to support factual news coverage.”

When asked about a typical day on the job, Daniel says that “every day is completely different. The traditional duties of a librarian, such as collection management, circulation procedures, and documentation happen alongside the more compelling activities of news research, which include editorial meetings, supporting the efforts of journalists, and working within the time constraints of looming deadlines.”

The New York Times maintains a sizable reference library, a photo archive, and a record of its own history, which spans an entire century. Along with the more mundane tasks of tending to these physical holdings, the research team is also responsible for managing database access, training reporters on the utilization of resources and research procedure, as well as fulfilling requests for uncovering facts.

“Being a comprehensive news outlet,” says Daniel, “the librarians are exposed to all areas of news coverage, which ensures a broad and exciting range of queries. Sometimes you’re navigating a database in order to provide information on land ownership, other times you’re building profiles for a suspected killer, and sometimes you’re looking up information on immigrant nationalization. It’s comparable to working in a public library setting, it varies, but the gravity of the information you’re seeking feels more pressing.”

Of the overall experience, Daniel says that he “gained insight into many things. I learned how news librarians collect, manage and redistribute information that supports the efforts of journalists, as well as their processes for documenting the history of their organization and its contributors. I learned how news stories grow from a seed of curiosity into a full-blown, juicy scoop on something pertinent to the world at large. I learned how to connect the dots, how to consider things in creative ways, how to navigate multiple types of databases; about laws governing our freedom to know, and our freedom to share what we’ve learned. I gained real-world experience in my chosen field, and I gained the confidence I need to apply my skills in professionally.”

Halfway towards meeting his degree requirements, Daniel is looking forward to more opportunities to engage with his education. He is excited to learn, grow, and gain insight into the many ways in which information professionals employ their skill-sets.

(Before earning their degree, ILS students must complete an on-site internship within a library or information services setting. Already employed as a paraprofessional at the New York Public Library’s Mid-Manhattan branch, Daniel sought to explore alternative pathways within his chosen profession.)

UMA has made the U.S. News & World Report’s list of Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs, ranking 103rd in a survey of 237 institutions participating.

“UMA is justifiably proud of its online offerings, which have been steadily growing over the past few years,” says President Handley. “Today, UMA students earn over 25% of their credits through online classes, and more and more of our programs offer an online option.”

Survey scores were based on statistical data gathered from questionnaires about each institution’s online specific bachelor’s degree programs. 50% of the ranking was from the school’s student engagement, 25% from faculty credentials and training, and 25% from services and technology available to students in the programs. The data was taken between July 1, 2011 and June 30,2012.

“We are pleased to have been ranked in the top half of this survey, especially since only universities that consider themselves as doing a good job with online learning would have chosen to participate,” says President Handley. “We feel we were competing with the very best in the nation and we fared very well.”

“At the same time, we will not be complacent,” adds Handley. “We will continue to strive for excellence in online and distance education as it becomes an increasingly desirable and accessible way to obtain a degree for Mainers and beyond.”

 

UMA Climbs to 61st in Nation for Best Online Programs, says U.S. News & World Reports.

For the second year in a row, U.S. News & World Reports selected UMA in its national ranking of universities offering top online degree programs.

After making U.S. News & World Reports top picks last year with a national ranking of 103rd in Best Online Bachelor programs, UMA climbed this year to 61st in the nation among the almost 300 schools considered by the magazine.

“We are not only pleased to have made U.S. News & World Reports top rankings again this year, but our climb to 61st in the nation affirms our strong commitment and continuing efforts to provide students with the very best in online offerings,” says Allyson Handley, President of UMA.

UMA offers nine online degree programs and over 200 online courses each year.

“Nearly 30% of UMA students complete the majority of their coursework online and that number continues to grow,” says UMA Dean Tom Abbott, who co-chairs UMA Distance Learning Council. “UMA will continue to strengthen our offerings to meet the growing demand.”

The U.S. News & World Reports’ rankings are based on statistical data gathered from questionnaires about each institution’s online specific bachelor’s degree programs.  The factors considered were, faculty credentials and training, peer reputation, student services and technology, and teaching practices and student engagement. The data was taken between July 2013 and September 2013.

Best Online Programs Veterans Bachelors BadgeUMA continues as a national leader in educating veterans says U.S. News & World Reports.

For the 2nd year in a row U.S. News & World Reports has selected UMA in its national ranking of universities that have the Best Online Bachelor’s Programs for Veterans. UMA is the only university in Maine that was ranked in the list.

In recent years, UMA has gained much national recognition for its excellent support of veterans and military personnel. GI Jobs Magazine has named UMA in its Military Friendly Schools list for the past five years, Military Times has listed UMA as a Best for Vets College for the past three years, and Military Advanced Education has ranked UMA as a Top College and University for the past two years.

The U.S. News & World Reports’ rankings are based on statistical data gathered from their ranking of the 2015 Best Online Bachelor’s Programs, which UMA was ranked in earlier this year.  From that list, universities qualify for the 2015 Best Online Bachelor’s Programs for Veterans by offering several other veterans-focused benefits. See the methodology for the veterans ranking here.

Among the support UMA offers veterans includes a peer mentor program, veteran’s lounges, and a Military and Veteran Affairs Advisory Council of UMA staff, faculty, alumni and community members that are dedicated to helping veteran students transition into a college career. In addition, UMA’s admissions and advising staff, many of whom are veterans themselves, are trained to help veteran and military students translate specialized military credit and/or other previously earned credits into a college major at UMA.

Since its doors opened in 1965, UMA has welcomed veterans and has continued to experience an increase in veteran graduates and students over the years; in fact, UMA currently has the highest percentage of student-veterans in the University of Maine System.

UMA offers top-quality, career-focused online degrees in Applied Science, Business Administration, Computer Information Systems, Information and Library Services, Justice Studies, Liberal Studies, Mental Health and Human Services, Public Administration, and Social Sciences.

For more information about UMA’s Veterans Program visit: uma.edu/veterans and for more information about UMA’s online programs visit: uma.edu/online.

UMA Bangor LogoStudents can get a head start by enrolling now in a pre-vet tech track.

University of Maine at Augusta President Glenn Cummings today announced that UMA’s proposed Bachelor’s in Veterinary Technology Program has received the green light to proceed from the University of Maine System.

The new program will formally begin in the fall of 2016, but students can get a head start by enrolling this summer or fall in a pre-veterinary technology track. The pre-vet tech track will help students fulfill certain prerequisites and requirements, and prepare them to compete for a Fall 2016 spot in the program.

The only such program to be offered in Maine, the Bachelor’s program will equip students with skills in biological/animal medical research, and office management as well as animal care and lab skills. To enhance career opportunities, the program will also allow students to choose tracks in business, small business or biology.

“We are humbled that so many organizations and community members have come forward to help us establish this exciting new Bachelor’s degree program,” said President Cummings.

Among the support UMA has received for the new program included a $25,000 grant from The Bank of Maine and several donations from the local veterinary community. In addition, Readfield residents and long-time UMA supporters Peter and Mary Thompson have established a special scholarship, which will annually benefit a Vet Tech student with financial need.

“We are also grateful to Jackson Labs who worked closely with us to develop the program and its curriculum,” added Cummings.

“Our work with Jackson Labs was a win-win,” said Cummings. “Not only will our students be prepared for a wide array of jobs in the animal care and research field, but Jackson Labs will benefit by having highly qualified UMA graduates ready to fill many important positions the Lab has had historical difficulty filling.”

UMA has previously offered an Associates in Veterinary Technology. That program is being phased out, with one more class being accepted for the fall of 2015.

To learn more about the Veterinary Technology Program at UMA visit: http://www.uma.edu/veterinarytechnology.html

50th White TH No Bottom LineRegister Now for Fall Semester

Fall semester classes start on August 31st.  Apply and/or register for fall classes NOW.

See what courses we are offering by looking at the online Course Guide.  Also check out some interesting Fall courses in the list of Fall Highlights below.

Ways to Register:

Fall Highlights:

ART 351 Ceramics II – Cross listed with ART 251, this class continues the exploration of ceramic materials and processes while developing the student’s aesthetic awareness in clay as both a functional and sculptural art form. The course is great for students looking for a fine arts performance course.

HUS 107E/307E (Basic or Applied Global Citizenship) – This combined course offering is a unique opportunity for students to learn diversity and digital literacy while working directly with students and faculty in the Czech Republic via international video conferencing.

ILS 450 Global Librarianship – This online course enlightens students about the importance of a global approach to library services whether locally or in the larger international community. Check out this video for more info: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFzlvusVDMk

HTY 359 – A web-based history course with Dr. Tom McCord, this class explores significant people, events, and issues in America from 1945 to the 1990s.

POS/NUR  420 – 9400 – The American Health Care System – This online mini session is a great elective for NUR/POS or INT majors, that focuses on the contemporary challenges within our healthcare system and exploration of other successful global healthcare systems.

WGS 301 – Feminist Theory – This class will examine the ways in which feminist thinkers have theorized how to achieve equality among genders. Offered live in Augusta, or from your home, office, campus center, or anywhere else you have access to a webcam via Google hangout.

NUR 326 – Caring for Aging Adults (fully online) – This course focuses on the use of best current evidence as a basis for holistic nursing care of the aging adult.

HUS 125 Chemical Dependency (ITV) – This course introduces the student to basic information concerning chemical addiction, it will be taught by Guy Cousins.

HUS 220 Child Mental Health (ITV) – An interdisciplinary applied course that expands on the physical, emotional, intellectual and social growth processes, it will be taught by Jon Bowen

HUS 263 Family Interactions (ITV) – This course presents issues and dynamics which affect family functioning, it will be taught by Jon Bowen.

HUS 289 Topics in Human Services: Opioid Addictions (ITV) – This course is designed to familiarize students with diagnostic and counseling strategies for treatment of people with opioid addictions, it will be taught by Guy Cousins.

HUS 305 Group Process (Live Augusta) – This course provides both an experiential and theoretical basis for the study of group dynamics and leadership styles, it will be taught by Jon Bowen.

HUS 346 Perspectives of Adult Mental Health through Popular Film (online) – An interdisciplinary course that expands on the physical, emotional, intellectual and social growth processes of adult mental health, it will be taught by Kim Lane.

HUS 436 Co-Occurring Disorders (ITV) – This course is designed to familiarize students with diagnostic and counseling strategies for treatment of people with co-occurring mental disorder and addiction, it will be taught by Guy Cousins.

BUA/MAT 315 Applied Statistics and Data Analysis: FALL 2015 – This course is designed to be a sequel to an introductory course in statistics which will build upon the foundation in descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and hypothesis testing.

Students can enroll now in the new B.S. in Cybersecurity program.

Henry Felch - CybersecurityThe University of Maine at Augusta and University College recently announced that the University of Maine System (UMS) Board of Trustees has approved a new Bachelor of Science in Cybersecurity.

(Click the image to the left to see a video about the program narrated by Henry Felch an Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems at UMA.)

Available through a partnership between UMA, UMFK, UMaine, and USM, the Bachelor of Science in Cybersecurity will incorporate a multidisciplinary perspective through a combination of computer science, communications, and ethics courses, with a post-baccalaureate option.

Cybersecurity is an evolving discipline that involves the study of strategy, policy, and standards regarding the security of and operations in cyberspace.  The program will prepare students for career opportunities or advanced education in the cybersecurity field including positions in security analysis, information assurance, digital forensics, intelligence, and cyber defense to name a few.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics is predicting a 37% growth in employment in the cybersecurity field by 2020.  Graduates with a B.S. in Cybersecurity will be prepared to fill these new positions as well as a predicted gap in Maine’s IT workforce significantly improving the statewide prospect for excellence in the computer-based delivery of information security services.

The curriculum has been designed to meet the stringent academic standards of the NSA/DHS jointly sponsored Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance/Cyber Defense (CAEIA/CD) program. The new B.S. in Cybersecurity is the first ever system collaborated degree program to be recognized by the CAEIA/CD.

Based on existing curriculum at UMA, UMFK and UMaine and a virtual lab created by USM, the new 4-year program will require no new resources, in fact, the synergy among the partnering institutions and optimized sharing of existing resources are expected to yield savings.

Required courses can be taken completely online, or through a combination of live, online and ITV classes.  Students can enroll now for the fall 2015 semester through any of the University of Maine System campuses including University College Centers.

For more info  contact UMA Enrollment Services at 1-877-UMA-1234 or visit: uma.edu/cybersecurity.

50th Anniversary Exhibit Unveils UMA Alumni Portraits and Stories

50 UMA FacesIn celebration of the University of Maine at Augusta’s 50th anniversary, an exhibition of photographs and stories of 50 alumni opens Jan. 20 at UMA’s Danforth Gallery.

“UMA Faces: 50years/50faces of alumni central to Maine” will be on display through Feb. 22. An opening reception is slated for Jan. 22, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Alumni photographers Jen Burton, Danielle DeWald Pease, and Roderick Small have created black and white portraits of notable UMA alumni who value the impact of education in their lives. The list includes veterans, artists, civic leaders, healthcare professionals, musicians, educators, authors, and veterinary technicians.

In addition to the photographs are five, four-foot square mixed media portraits of seven alumni, including former Maine First Lady Mary Hermon, entrepreneur Roger Pomerleau, and UMA finance professor and musician Jon Finnegan. Each collaborative portrait is composed of 36 squares created by collage, drawing, painting, pen and ink, and other media.

The UMA Faces exhibit also launches the Maine Photo Project, a statewide collaboration of more than 30 museums, galleries and historical societies presenting photography-themed exhibitions and programs during 2015.

In conjunction with its 50th anniversary, UMA also has a 50th Anniversary Fund campaign designed to funnel funds to support scholarships, veterans enrolled at UMA, and strengthen online and distance education. To date, more than half of the fundraising goal of $5 million has been attained.

For more information visit the following links:

Exhibition Website: http://umafaces.com
Exhibition Catalog: http://www.blurb.com/b/5935535-50-faces-uma
Maine Photo Project: http://www.mainephotoproject.org

Forum on Personal and Financial Security while Aging in Place

Forum on the Future LogoThe UMA Senior College is hosting a forum on Personal and Financial Security for seniors in Jewett Hall Auditorium at UMA on Sunday, February 1, from 2:00 – 4:00 PM. This is the third of a series of forums on how older citizens can successfully and safely age at home.

During the forum, a panel of experts will discuss optimizing your savings account, protection from fraud and physical and emotional safety, as well as answer questions about what you can do if you or others you know have been exploited.

Panelists include Judith Shaw, Securities Administrator for the Maine Office of Securities, and co- chair of the Maine Council for Elder Abuse Prevention, Denis Culley an Attorney for the Legal Services for the Elderly, and Nan Bell, Community Educator of the Family Violence Project.

Panelist’s presentations will be followed by an audience discussion.

The forum is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. A snow is set for February 22nd.

For more information contact UMA Senior College at 621-3551 or umasc@maine.edu

University of Maine at Augusta