University of Maine at Augusta

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The mission of the University of Maine at Augusta Senior College is to provide a curriculum of stimulating learning opportunities and activities for persons 50 and over and their spouses or partners.

The University of Maine at Augusta supports our Senior College activities by providing office and classroom space, as well as, support services. All Senior College Board members, faculty, and committee members are unpaid volunteers. The efforts of all who contribute to the success of UMASC are much appreciated.

For further information, please call 621-3551. During the registration period the Office is staffed in the morning, but phone messages may be checked at varying times during the day.

Register in Person OR by Mail:

UMA Senior College Office – Farmhouse
46 University Drive
Augusta, ME 04330

CREDIT CARD PAYMENTS ARE ACCEPTED.

For the next 2 weeks the office will be staffed every morning. After that, staff will be available 2 to 3 mornings per week. Call before coming. (621-3551).

NOTE: If for any reason you are unable to attend the courses for which you have registered, please contact the Senior College office at 621-3551 ASAP.

We have waiting lists for filled courses.

The University of Maine at Augusta Senior College complies with all laws which define the rights of individuals with disabilities and makes reasonable efforts to accommodate specific needs related to Senior College programs.

If you have specific disability needs, please let the Senior College office know about them in a timely fashion, for lead time is required to determine possible accommodations.

In complying with the letter and spirit of applicable laws and in pursuing its own goals of diversity, the University of Maine System shall not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veterans status in employment, education, and all other areas of the University System. The University provides reasonable accommodations to qualified individuals with disabilities upon request.

Questions and complaints about discrimination in any area of the University should be directed to Sheri Stevens, Equal Opportunity Director, UMA Farmhouse, 621-3110 (TDD-207-621-3107).

Spring 2016

Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
8:00 AM

No Classes on Monday April 18th

Patriots Day

Spanish I

Classic Films

Woodcarving

10:15 AM

Maine’s Natural World

Let it Be(atles)

Basket Weaving I

Balance & Beyond

Granite Hill 11 AM

Beginner’s Bridge

Basketry II

 ABC’s of Drawing I

Women who Rock

Joy of Poetry

Israel – Promised Land?

1:00 PM National Parks from the Rockies East

France, Quebec, Tunisia through Film

Aging in Place w/Grace

Exploring Acrylics II

ABC’s of Drawing II

Game of Petanque

(Begins 5/26)

Mainers in the Civil War

Screwball Comedy on Film

Living the Light of Death

Watercolor For Beginners

3:15 PM

No Classes on Monday April 18th

Patriots Day

Matter of Consciousness

Mark Twain

Please click on a course title for the course details, Click the title again to shrink the course details.

Spring 2016

Fundamentals of Basket Weaving I

8 Mondays, Mar 14 – May 9

10:15 – 12:15, Room 250 Randall

Diane Wheeler

An 8-week course teaching the fundamentals of basket making. Each basket made will build on the skills learned in the previous basket. At least four baskets will be completed by the end of the course. Each student should bring: 2-gallon pail for water, and an awl or ice pick or small gauge knitting needle. Materials provided.

Women Who Rocked The World Monday Session

8 Mondays, Mar 21 – May 16

10:15 – 12:15,  185 Jewett

Michael Bell

See Friday’s description of Women Who Rocked The World.

Maine’s Natural World

8 Mondays, Mar 14 – May 9

10:15 – 12:15,  Room 246 Randall

Members of Maine Master Naturalists Program

Six graduates of the Maine Master Naturalists Program explore different aspects of Maine’s natural history. Topics covered will include: birds, ferns, geology, mammals, nature journaling, spring twigs and trees, vernal pools and associated fauna, and wildflowers.

National Parks: From the Rockies East

8 Mondays, Mar 14 – May 9

1:00 – 3:00,  250 Randall

Elizabeth Reinsborough

Our National Parks are often called America’s “Crown Jewels”. In over 400 parks they protect the best of our nation’s scenic, scientific and historic heritage: battlefields and barrier islands; forts and fossils; glaciers and geysers; monuments and mansions and the list goes on! From Yellowstone to the Everglades, Acadia to Big Bend, and many parks in between, we will explore what is unique about various parks from the Rockies to the Atlantic. Half of each class will be a visual presentation by the instructor. Students will be encouraged to share and participate in brief presentations. Textbook provided.

Balance and Beyond

8 Tuesdays, Mar 15 – May 3

10:15 – 12:15,  Khlar Classroom

Carole Baldwin

This class is for those who took part in the balance class offered here at Senior College. We will review the exercises we learned about last year and move on to experiencing games and activities that are appropriate for seniors. Yoga, Tai Chi, stretching and moving to music will be a part of every class.

France, Quebec, Tunisia Through Film

8 Tuesdays, Mar 15 – May 3

1:00 – 3:30,  Klahr Rotunda

Sylvie Charron

This course will examine selected cinematic productions (in French with English subtitles) from and about France, Québec and Tunisia: Intouchables, Food Beware (documentary), Free Men, Coco Avant Chanel, C.R.A.Z.Y, Jésus de Montréal, and The Wedding Song. We will discuss the film backgrounds and some of their cultural components such as social class, sustainable agriculture, gender issues, fashion, WWII, and religion (Catholic, Muslim, Jewish). Materials provided.

Aging in Place with Grace

8 Tuesdays, Mar 15 – May 3

1:00 – 3:00,  246 Randall

Grace Leonard

This course will discuss services, quality of life, societal attitudes, retirement and living environment, and the myths and realities of aging. Interviews, role playing and positive, mindful attitudes will be emphasized.

Beginner’s Bridge

8 Wednesdays, Mar 23 – May 11

10:15 – 12:15,  Klahr Classroom

Peter / Suzanne Rosenberg and Barbara Livingston

Bridge is a wonderful, fascinating, complex and intellectually stimulating game for seniors to enjoy. Learn the Standard American bidding method and join the fun. Three instructors will guide you for this “For Beginners Only” course. Materials provided.

Basketry II

8 Wednesdays, Mar 16 – May 4

10:15 – 12:15,  248 Randall

Diane Wheeler

This course will be a continuation of Course 1. We will make up to 3 baskets, larger in size, than class one. More new skills will be taught. Class will be limited to those who completed Class 1 or with the instructor’s permission.

ABC’s of Drawing I

8 Thursdays, Mar 17 – May 5

10:15 – 12:15,  295 Jewett

Barbara McCarthy

The ability to draw is being able to see what is observed and to transfer that observation to paper. Fundamental drawing skills and techniques can be learned. We will use exercises to encourage the right side of the brain to do the work of “seeing”. With practice, it will gradually become easier to switch consciously into intuitive visual perception. “What the eye can see, the hand can draw.” – Michelangelo. Materials provided.

ABC’s of Drawing II

8 Thursdays, Mar 17 – May 5

1:00 – 3:00,  295 Jewett

Barbara McCarthy

We will review and continue to work on problems of natural, atmospheric, one, two and three point linear perspective and curves in perspective. Then, emphasis will be on drawing techniques and anatomy of the human head. Drawings will be oriented to the understanding of the human skull which creates the basic forms of the head, the muscles which give movement and the features which infuse the whole with life. Materials provided. This course builds on Drawing I as a prerequisite.

Exploring Acrylics II

8 Thursdays, Mar 17 – May 5

1:00 – 3:00,  246 Randall

Carole Baldwin, Elizabeth Luckraft

This is a course for people who have had some experience with painting. We’ll build on the fundamentals presented in Acrylics I and continue to explore the use of color, texture and various tools to create abstracts, still lifes, landscapes and mixed media creations. Our goal is to help people tap into their creative selves, have fun as they experiment with paint and other materials and amaze themselves as they create unique pieces of art.

Learn the Game of Petanque

6 Thursdays May 26 – June 30

1:00 – End of Game

Raymond Fecteau

This course will consist of six 2 +/- hour sessions at Augusta’s Mill Park. We will start in the classroom with an explanation of the history and basic rules of the game, and learn proper stance, grip, backswing and release, pointing, etc. Then we will go to Mill Park where you will learn to play 2 on 2 and learn to “read” the courts. It’s an easy game to learn, so we cannot be responsible if you become addicted to this game.

Spanish I

8 Fridays, Mar 18 – May 6

8:00 – 10:00,  289 Jewett

Chuck Acker

This will be an introductory course in Spanish, no previous study required. However, any previous instruction or Spanish- speaking travel will add to the richness of the class. We will emphasize communication and overcoming inhibitions in expressing yourself in Spanish. Workbook is provided, but after we get started you will probably need a small dictionary and verb book.

Woodcarving: Beginning & Beyond

8 Fridays, Mar 18 – May 6

8:00 – 10:00,  250 Randall

Loyd Clark

Learn and practice basic safety and carving cuts to produce several projects and/or to continue learning with slightly more complex projects. Individual assistance is given as much as possible. We will try to make the learning fun … it’s only wood … and there are no such things as ‘mistakes’, just ‘design changes’. Materials and instructions provided.

Classic Films for Senior College

9 Fridays, Mar 18 – May 13

8:30 – 12:00,  Klahr Rotunda

Chet Day, Art Ray, Peter Ezzy

This course consists of an analytical and fun discussion group exploring the relative merits of selected top-rated Classic Films as determined by the American Film Institute (AFI), British Film Institute (BFI), and prior classes. Films are critiqued and ranked in order of preference by participants. Class members are given the opportunity to take turns leading the discussions. The selection of films for this semester is as follows: Singing in the Rain, 1952; Bringing Up Baby, 1938; Maltese Falcon, 1941; Laura, 1944; The Lady Killers, 1955; To Kill a Mockingbird, 1962; Amadeus, 1984; Hugo, 2011; Bonus Selection pending. Text and study materials provided.

Women Who Rocked the World

8 Fridays, Mar 18 – May 6

10:15 – 12:15,  250 Randall

Mike Bell

Using the life stories of a series of famous, and not so famous, women, this class will examine history from an often overlooked perspective.

Joy of Poetry

8 Fridays, Mar 18 – May 6

10:15 – 12:15,  246 Randall

Ted Bookey

Poetry has been described as the map of the soul. This class is designed for those who wish to explore that map, those who already enjoy poetry and would like to enhance their appreciation and pleasure, those who find contemporary poetry difficult and wish to understand and enjoy it more, and for those who already write poetry, or for those who might like to begin. We’ll start with some enjoyable poetry-starting exercises. We will also read and discuss a variety of poems, explore how a poem works and why it has the power to move the reader. Materials provided.

Israel – The Promised Land?

8 Fridays, Mar 18 – May 6

10:15 – 12:15,  190 Jewett

Robert Bernheim

Why is Israel called the Promised Land? What does the Bible have to say on this topic, and what are the implications / issues for our modern world? Please bring any Bible with you.

Mainers in the Civil War

8 Fridays, Mar 18 – May 6

1:00 – 3:00,  248 Randall

Tom Feagin

This course will examine the role of Mainers in the Civil War – both military and civilian – from Hamlin to Hyde to Howard.

Living in the Light of Death: On the Art of Being Truly Alive

8 Fridays, Mar 18 – May 6

1:00 – 3:00,  246 Randall

Jonathan Lepoff

We will read and study this book which presents the Buddhist approach to facing the inevitable facts of growing older, getting sick, and dying. These tough realities are not given much attention by many people until midlife, when they become harder to avoid. Using a Buddhist text known as the Five Subjects for Frequent Recollection, Larry Rosenberg shows how intimacy with the realities of aging can actually be used as a means to liberation. When we become intimate with these inevitable aspects of life, he writes, we also become intimate with ourselves, with others, with the world — indeed with all things.

Screwball Comedy on Film

8 Fridays, Mar 18 – May 6

1:00 – 4:00,  Klahr Rotunda

David Greenham

Some of the most memorable comic moments on film can be found in films that fall under the genre of “Screwball comedy”. We show some of the more famous examples such as Twentieth Century (1934), The Philadelphia Story (1940), Mr. Hulot’s Holiday (1953) and Tom Jones (1963). This class will be a fun give and take, and will feature discussions of script and story development techniques used, emotional and character development styles of the genre, and will include a few surprise clips of great comedy on film that are guaranteed to brighten your day.

Watercolors For Beginners

5 Fridays, Mar 18 – April 15

1:00 – 3:00,  250 Randall

Hélène Farrar

No one needs to be a sumi master to paint watercolors! Join us for a beautiful introduction to this versatile water medium. Students will learn and develop skills in various mark making techniques, explore how technique applies to different subject matter, and become knowledgeable of watercolor in art history through artists’ work. Materials provided.

Mark Twain: Tom, Huck, and Jim

8 Fridays, Mar 18 – May 6

3:15 – 5:15,  248 Randall

Lincoln Ladd & Tom Feagin

Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn are very different books with variations on a set of themes central to both Mark Twain and 19th century American history. They also seem focused on unresolved 21st century issues, such as educational philosophies and standards; miseducation; the uses and abuses of religion; mental illness; and dysfunctional families. This course is designed to complement and complete the Fall 2015 course initiated by Bryant Hoffman. Materials provided.

This Matter of Consciousness

8 Fridays, Mar 18 – May 6

3:15 – 5:15,  289 Jewett

Charles Acker

This course will present a brief study of the brain and consciousness. The first part will entail a brief study of brain anatomy and functioning with reference to hygiene for the aging brain. Then with some knowledge of brain matter we will address that “hard problem” which vexes both neurologists and philosophers: How does this quivering mass of 81 billion neurons give rise to the experience of consciousness? Seminar style of instruction. Some reading will be required to benefit from discussion. Textbook provided.

YVONNE FARNSWORTH LECTURE SERIES HELD AT GRANITE HILL ESTATES

Spring 2016

Tuesdays, 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

This eight-week course, held at Granite Hill Estates, is a potpourri of topics offered by faculty members of Senior College at the University of Maine at Augusta. This lecture series will be held in the Media Room. Preference will be given the first three weeks to Granite Hill residents who pay membership and course tuition.   Any UMASC member who wishes to take this class should register at the usual time and will be accepted on a first come basis to fill the class. Each class will be on Tuesday from 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM, beginning September 15th. The following is a list of lectures for the Fall semester:

March 15 – Chewonki Foundation – “Predators”
March 22 – Mike Bell – A Long Way from Home: Maine connections to Custer and The Little Bighorn
March 29 – Tina Barden – The Quilt & I – My Passion for Patchwork
April 5 – Elizabeth Reinsborough – A Brief Look at The Balkans
April 12 – Don Osier – Living with Vitality: An Introduction to Wellness
April 19 – Michael Chaney & Leah Sprague – The Life and Legacy of Frances Perkins
April 26 – Peter Rosenberg – South Korea: The Love of Kimchee
May 3 – Pat Jones – 2014 Winter in Laos
May 10 – Ted / Ruth Bookey – Introduction to Poetry of Nobel Laureate, Wislawa Szmborska

University of Maine at Augusta