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RAP logoAs part of its continuing commitment to intellectual community, the University of Maine at Augusta holds a regular Research and Pedagogy (RaP) colloquium series at which UMA faculty and staff present works in progress to their peers.  The series provides a forum for the presentation of creative work, theoretical considerations, research findings, innovations in teaching, and projects in community engagement.  Ensuing discussion promotes collaboration through the exchange of ideas and the development of relationships across colleges, programs, departments and disciplines. 

The colloquium series takes place in during the noon hour in multiple locations on UMA's multiple campuses.  The time reflects our commitment to inclusion, a traditional lunch hour for staff and the time between morning and afternoon classes for faculty and students.  The places of our meeting stand in recognition of our university's broad reach across the state of Maine. Wherever we meet to present and to learn, we discover that amidst the accumulated knowledge of the centuries, there are still new thoughts to be spoken out loud.

 

2014-2015

 

Upcoming RaP Sessions for 2014-2015:

 

Separating Words From Thought: Spoken and Written English, Varied Perspectives -- A Roundtable Discussion

Michelle Lisi, Director of University College Virtual Academic Writing Lab and Tutoring (VAWLT) ProjectMichelle Lisi, Director of University College Virtual Academic Writing Lab and Tutoring (VAWLT) Project, with writing tutors from UMA and University College

Tuesday, November 18, 12 noon

University of Maine at Augusta Katz Library

In March of 2014, the UMA Writing Centers of Augusta and Bangor traveled to the NEWCA (Northeast Writing Center Association) Conference to host and participate in discussions of writing center pedagogy and practice. Much of the conversation focused on the discrepancy between spoken and written English, our role as tutors in supporting and encouraging the understanding of the distinction between them, and the impact of choosing one dialect over another in communicating ideas about texts and subjects. We addressed the Writing Center’s place in encouraging difference in dialect and supporting the acquisition of Edited American English (E.A.E.).

Our RaP presentation this fall will return to that discussion and to our mixed response to the arguments made by NEWCA keynote speaker Verhawn Young at the outset of the conference. In particular, we’ll review and encourage dialogue about the following questions posed by the NEWCA Steering Committee: How can Writing Centers more effectively honor students’ own languages? How can Writing Centers create opportunities for students to use their own languages? Faculty expectations for college-level writing/ institutional norms and students’ needs and abilities, combined with their own individual experiences with writing, are often two opposing forces. How do tutors work to reconcile institutional values of language with students' own languages?

 

 

The Cultural Impacts of Climate Change

Dr. Kati Corlew, Assistant Professor of Social ScienceAssistant Professor of Social Science Kati Corlew

Thursday, December 4, 12 noon

Nottage Library

University of Maine at Augusta, Bangor Campus

Dr. Kati Corlew shares her work concerning Tuvalu, a low-lying island nation and a Least Developed State.  It is poised to be one of the first nation casualties of climate change as it is projected to become uninhabitable due to sea level rise in the next 50 to 100 years.  The indigenous Tuvaluan population is now faced with extreme political, economic, social, and cultural decisions and uncertainties.

 

Archive of RaP Sessions for 2013-2014:

 

Why Americans are Not Bilingual

Yarissa Ortiz-Vidal, Adjunct Professor of Spanish

Wednesday, September 17, 12 noon

University of Maine at Augusta Katz Library

The United States of America is still being referred to as a nation of second-language illiterates, as linguistically malnourished, as in essence a monolingual nation.  Approximately 82% of Americans are monolingual and only 9% of Americans who speak a second language are highly proficient.  In comparison, 50% of Europeans speak a second language fluently.  Why, despite several educational reforms in an era of globalization, is second-language instruction not a priority as it is in other nations around the world?  This presentation seeks an answer with a review of research regarding native English speakers and their exposure to second-language instruction.

 

To Stay Here and Die Here For My Country: Climate Change in Tuvalu

Assistant Professor of Social Science Kati CorlewDr. Kati Corlew, Assistant Professor of Social Science

Friday, October 3, 12 noon

University of Maine at Augusta Katz Library

Climate change is a global phenomenon with disparate causes and consequences. Tuvalu is a low-lying island nation in the South Pacific and a Least Developed State. It is poised to be one of the first nation casualties of climate change as it is projected to become uninhabitable due to sea level rise in the next 50 to 100 years. The indigenous Tuvaluan population is now faced with extreme political, economic, social, and cultural decisions and uncertainties. This qualitative research explored the human dimensions of climate change in Tuvalu, focusing on cultural reactions, understandings, and projections for future from a psychological perspective.

 

 

Adult Development and Higher Education:  The Unstated Curriculum

Chip Curry, Student Services Coordinator at the University College at RocklandChip Curry, Student Services Coordinator

Wednesday, October 15, 12 noon

University College at Rockland

We all have hopes for the impact of education on students. Often these hopes go far beyond gaining knowledge and skills.  In addition to being able to demonstrate mastery of content, our hope is that our students will grow to their fullest potential.  Our hope is that over the course of four or more years our students will think differently; relate to others differently; understand themselves differently; and maybe discover a greater sense of purpose.

 

These goals for students are not new.  For a century or more colleges have sought to build young men (and later young women) often valuing character development over content knowledge.   What is new is that in many places, like right here in Rockland, students are not primarily arriving at the tail-end of adolescents but rather are showing up in all stages of adulthood.  


This RaP seeks to explore what student development might look like for adult learners. In particular I’m hoping we can engage in a discussion of how we support adult students to succeed academically and to grow and develop to their greatest potential.

 

Women and Fitness in American Culture

Sarah Hentges, Assistant Professor of American Studies

Tuesday, October 28, 12 noon

Eastport Hall 124

University of Maine at Augusta Bangor Campus

Dr. Hentges will talk about the ways in which we can understand women and fitness from a variety of interdisciplinary lenses, and the ways in which the experiences of women and fitness represent the larger context of "American Fitness."

 

The Price of Complacency and the Strength of Will

John G. Shattuck, Adjunct Professor of Mental Health and Human Services

Wednesday, November 5, 12 noon

University College at Rockland

This RaP reviews how in the 1970s persistent allegations of abuse at the Governor Baxter School for the Deaf to Governor Brennan and Commissioners of Education resulted in an investigation by the Attorney General’s office and the termination of the school’s Superintendent, Principal and Head Teacher.  John Shattuck will tell the story of how 5 courageous men from Maine’s Deaf Community gained the attention of the Governor and the Legislative Branch to provide $17.5 million in compensation to those who suffered as children at the State administered school for the Deaf.

 

Teaching and Living Internationally

Thursday, November 6, 12 noon

University of Maine at Augusta Katz Library

In the RaP panel “Teaching and Living Internationally,” Tom Giordano, Ellen Taylor, Lisa Botshon, Mary Lewis Davitt, and Chelsea Ray will discuss their teaching in an international context.  Zaid Dajani, an international student, will discuss his experiences at UMA.

Dr. Tom Giordano teaches the 400 level International Business course which is a requirement of all Business Management majors. In the course students research a country's business and political environments, its customs and business practices, among other factors that affect conducting  business in that country. The research concludes with students presenting a business plan on how to start a new business in that country. In addition, guest speakers with significant international business experience talk with students about the challenges and opportunities associated with conducting business outside of the US.

Dr. Ellen Taylor is a professor of English and Women and Gender Studies at UMA.  She has taught three integrated courses which involved travel with students, twice to Nicaragua and more recently to Cuba.  She has also brought students to Guatemala as part of a Latin American Literature course.    Dr. Taylor will talk about traveling as an intellectual and emotional education, building academic community, and creating more global citizens.

Dr. Mary Louis Davitt is a professor of Justice Studies.  She will discuss her teaching at the Azov Regional Institute in Berdyansk, Ukraine as a Fulbright fellow.  She will also touch upon the current situation in Ukraine.

Dr. Lisa Botshon is a professor of English and will present on UMA-University of Ljubljana connections via 3 Fulbrights, 3 visiting professors, and 3 collaborative classes since 2009.

Chelsea Ray is a professor of French and Comparative Literature.  She teaches French language courses, as well as a course on Franco-American culture.  Dr. Ray will moderate the panel and briefly talk about her recent work with the community, including an innovative project connecting UMA to the local elementary schools (Maine French Heritage Language Program http://www.uma.edu/mfhlp.html)

 

2013-2014

Archive of RaP Sessions for 2013-2014:

 

Sci-Fi Live: From William Gibson to Ray Kurzweil

Mojca Krevel, Professor of English, University of Ljubljana

Wednesday, March 26, 12 noon

University of Maine at Augusta Katz Library

 

»We live, indisputably, in a science fiction world«.

James Gunn. Alternate Worlds: The Illustrated History of Science Fiction (1975) -- Quoted in Landon, Brooks. Science Fiction After 1900: From the Steam Man to the Stars (New York: Routledge, 2002): 5

Sci-Fi Live: Lecture by Professor Mojca Krevel at UMA

 


I got the idea for the topic of this talk a few months ago when, while randomly flipping through channels, my attention was caught by the familiar phantasmagoria of flickering trajectories of brain-computer interfacing and pulsing images of neurons firing to computer-generated data. What initially looked like a yet unseen documentary on the 1980s cyberpunk movement, was, in fact, a film version of Ray Kurzweil’s 2005 best-selling The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Technology. The resemblance between Kurzweil’s vision of the future and the worlds of literary cyberpunk, especially those envisioned in William Gibson’s Sprawl trilogy, seemed uncanny.

The thing is, Kurzweil's predictions for the future fundamentally rely on the actual developments and developmental trends in 1990s and 2000s technology and science. Kurzweil is, after all, an award-winning inventor, mathematician, and one of the leading experts on computer and artificial intelligence. William Gibson, on the other hand, is a full-time sci-fi writer with a BA in English, who provided the blueprint for what were to become the trademarks of the 1980s cyberpunk writing: computers, computerized environments and artificial intelligence. But while fuelling digital fantasies of thousands of computer geeks, Gibson wrote most of his Sprawl trilogy on a typewriter and consciously avoided using the internet well into the 1990s.

In my talk I will focus on two things.  First I will present the extent to which Kurzweil’s informed and well-founded projections coincide with the invented concepts and motifs in Gibson’s 1980s Sprawl trilogy. I will then consider the correspondence from the perspective of the hitherto established mechanisms governing the functioning and the structure of the postmodern epoch. Relying primarily on the concepts and terminology developed by Jean Baudrillard I will show that the high degree of correspondence is far from uncanny; it is practically inevitable given the popularity of Gibson’s trilogy. The explanation will also make clear why the criticism and controversies surrounding the accuracy and feasibility of Kurzweil’s predictions are ultimately irrelevant to the topic at hand.

 

We Can Get There From Here: Designing Online Interaction

 

Mina Matthews and B.J. Kitchin, University College E-Learning Specialists

Wednesday, April 9, 12 noon

University of Maine at Augusta Katz Library

In this active hour, Matthews and Kitchin focus on designing web-friendly online courses to boost our marketing appeal and simultaneously engage students. Three interaction patterns using technologies available within our system (Blackboard and Google Apps) are identified. The structure includes a hands-on component where faculty can follow along on their own laptops or computers (tablets not recommended) to perform a few basic design patterns that are personally relevant to them.

 

Women and Fitness in American Culture

Assistant Professor of American Studies Sarah Hentges

Thursday, April 10, 12 noon

University of Maine at Augusta Bangor Campus Eastport Hall 124

Dr. Hentges will share some of her critical and creative explorations of American fitness, focused on making connections between fitness and gender, specifically in regard to the cultural depictions of fitness for women.

  

 

 

 

Why Americans are Not Bilingual

Yarissa Ortiz-Vidal, Adjunct Professor of Spanish

Monday, March 3, 12 noon

University College at Rockland

The United States of America is still being referred to as a nation of second-language illiterates, as linguistically malnourished, as in essence a monolingual nation.  Approximately 82% of Americans are monolingual and only 9% of Americans who speak a second language are highly proficient.  In comparison, 50% of Europeans speak a second language fluently.  Why, despite several educational reforms in an era of globalization, is second-language instruction not a priority as it is in other nations around the world?  This presentation seeks an answer with a review of research regarding native English speakers and their exposure to second-language instruction.

 

 

 

 

Laura Rodas Leads RaP Session on Academic Integrity, 2-12-2014 at UMAThe State of Academic Integrity at UMA

Laura Rodas, Coordinator of Community Standards and Mediation

Wednesday, February 12, 12 noon

University of Maine at Augusta Katz Library

Academic honesty in higher education is of the utmost importance. During February 12th's RaP session, discussion will focus on UMA's Academic Integrity Code and procedures the responsibilities of faculty members, students, and the Office of the Dean of Students; and how to make a complaint.

Special attention paid to delineation of academic sanctions vs. disciplinary sanctions, repeat violations, and examples of challenging Academic Integrity matters. Q & A to follow.

 

 

Poetry, the Iraq War, and the Legacy of Trauma

Jeff Sychterz, Assistant Professor of English

Tuesday, February 11, 12 noon

University of Maine at Augusta Bangor Campus Eastport Hall 124

On Tuesday, February 11th, Jeff Sychterz, an Assistant Professor of English at UMA Bangor, will present his most recent research on Iraq War Poetry. Since 2003, America has experienced a poetic output not seen since the Vietnam War, and much of this poetry has been written in response to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. While most of the war poems are strictly political in nature, both pro- and anti-war, in the recent years there has been a rapidly growing cadre of poets writing about their wartime experiences. This group includes Iraqi expatriates, American combat veterans, and the mothers, sisters and wives of these soldiers. This historically diverse group provides us with important insights that had been ignored in previous wars. In particular, this most recent war poetry forces us, as never before, to confront the legacy of trauma and its effects not only upon the war zone survivor, but also upon those that he (and she) comes home to. Dr. Sychterz will share some of these poems and will discuss how poetry both represents and is itself shaped by the trauma of war.

 

 

 

Orientalism: West Meets the Middle East

David Farmer, Adjunct Professor of Art

Wednesday, November 13, 12 noon, University College at Rockland

In the 19th century, Western artists, writers, scholars and (eventually) tourists rediscovered what they called the Orient -- Ottoman Turkey, Egypt, North Africa and the Holy Land. It was an opportunity to explore a region characterized by very different cultures, religion and history. Artists played a major role in defining Western attitudes toward the Middle East, and our current complex relationship with the region makes historical background seem especially relevant.

 

Six Great Ideas in Computer Science

Mark Goodridge, Adjunct Professor of Computer Science

Wednesday, November 13, 12 noon, Katz Library, University of Maine at Augusta

As computer technology developed in the 20th century a series of discoveries, spread across the fields of physics, logic, and philosophy, made by computer science pioneers both famous and unknown, became the foundations of the digital technology revolution. These ideas are both easy to explain and generally unknown. It is my opinion that adult who regularly uses computer technology would find an appreciation of these ideas both interesting and beneficial.

For example: Two Italian programmers discovered that all computer instructions can be expressed in one of three simple ways. This has profound implications for solving many problems. Why is it that we can predict with high confidence that two years from now our computing devices will be twice as powerful, but our cars won't? What do hardware engineers mean when they say "If forests were designed the way computers are, one woodpecker would cut down every tree"? Why are software engineers able to sort problems into three categories. One is the category of problems that computers should be able to solve. The second is the category of problems that computers may be able to solve eventually. The third is the category of problems that computers will never be able to solve, and they can use computers to prove it.

 

Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: What's in a Name?

WGS faculty members Sarah Hentges, Kay Retzlaff, and Jeff Sychterz

Tuesday, November 19, 12 noon, 124 Eastport Hall

Faculty: Women's studies recently changed its name and mission to Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Why the change? What does this new name mean for WGS teachers, students, and minors? What kinds of classes will be offered as a part of this new program? What is WGS and what is its importance in our educations and in our lives?

Students: How can you be a WGS minor? What kinds of classes are offered? How do you become a WGS minor? Why minor in WGS?

 

 

"She Blinded Me with Science! The Case for Information Literacy in Our Classrooms"

Assistant Professor of Information and Library Services Vincent Livoti

Thursday, October 17, Noon to 1 pm

University of Maine at Augusta, Katz Library

 

Information Literacy is a pillar of critical thought. While the phrase “critical thinking” currently has substantial buzz across the academy, many educators continue to struggle with ways to both distill and instill this perspective in an information-age of passive reception. Given the ubiquitous nature of multimedia for so-called digital natives, it is increasingly cleat that many of the essential skills for success in both our physical and on-line classrooms have converged. Like all literacies, information literacy is a set of skills and perceptual frames that can be identified, demonstrated and applied. Drawing from the trials and errors of teaching online, this talk will provide a set of practical, accessible and even entertaining approaches for integrating critical thinking tools into our diverse learning environments.

 

 

Roundtable Discussion: Putting Ideas into Action -- Civic Engagement

Val Marsh, Coordinator of Civic Engagement

Tuesday, October 22, 12 noon, 124 Eastport Hall

Faculty: What kinds of civic engagement assignments do you assign students? What information do you need to help you figure out how to include civic engagement in your classroom? What are the challenges of civic engagement? What are the rewards? Bring examples to share with colleagues!

Students: What kinds of opportunities have you had for civic engagement in and out of the classroom?

 

 

 

"Roundtable Discussion: Distance Education: The Challenges and Triumphs"

B.J. Kitchin, eLearning Specialist II

Wednesday, September 25, 12 noon

138 Eastport Hall, UMA Bangor Campus

Faculty: How do you approach your online or compressed video or ITV courses? What have you done in the classroom that you think really works? What are some of the challenges you face teaching online or through other distance technologies? How do you organize your courses? What kinds of assignments do students do? Bring examples to share with colleagues!

Students: What challenges do you face in online or compressed video or ITV classes? What could your professors do better? How can professors, or UMA more generally, support your learning through distance technologies?

 

"Showtime! Using Drama, Speech, and Debate in the Workplace"

showtimethumb

Adjunct Professors Steve Moro and Jon Potter

Wednesday, September 25, Noon to 1 pm

University College at Rockland

We know that technology is an ever-changing force in our lives, as teachers, and as students. However, despite technology’s allure, there are other powerful forces in our lives. Showtime!, by paying attention to what we already know and have, presents practical strategies for recharging the amazing forces that are within us all. We all hold immense power. We can sculpt others’ opinions, focus their thinking, call forth positive emotional connections with ideas, and provide rock-solid factual foundations for all of these. So — Welcome to Showtime! In a brief hour, we hope to re-awaken those personal communication skills we need for success in our ever-changing world.

 

2012-2013

Archive of 2012-2013 RaP Sessions:

 

 "French in Maine: A Community-Based Approach"

Assistant Professor of French and Comparative Literature Chelsea Ray 

Tuesday, April 23, Noon to 1 pm

University of Maine at Augusta, Katz Library

Chelsea Ray, Assistant Professor of French and Comparative Literature at UMA, will present on her current work building support for the French language on campus and the creation of the French minor.  The French minor was recently updated, so she will touch upon these changes and how she hopes to build more support for this academic discipline on campus.  She will also talk about her use of the online platform iLrn in her beginning French classes, as well as the integration of native speakers, both from the community as well as from the University of Western Brittany in France.

In addition, Chelsea will discuss a new community-based initiative for UMA students, who can serve as apprentices in the MaineFrench Heritage Language Program.  She will discuss the program and its goals for revitalizing efforts to renew interest in French language learning in Maine. The goal of the program is to bridge the gap between generations, celebrate Maine’s rich cultural Franco-American heritage
and French as it is spoken in Maine, enhance student aspirations, and demonstrate that learning languages is a key to the world.  Finally, she will touch upon how the curriculum development she is engaged with at the elementary level informs her work in the university language classroom.  

 

 

"Presidential Mini-Grant Research: a Student Symposium"

Assistant Professor of Mental Health and Human Services Terry Adams

Wednesday, April 10, Noon to 1 pm

University of Maine at Augusta, Katz Library

During this RAP session Dr. Terry Adams will be briefly be discussing the work that has gone into four research projects funded by Presidential Mini-Grants. Dr. Adams will start the presentation by briefly discussing the research in general followed by student researchers who will discuss each project for roughly 5 minutes each. Students will discuss the research questions, methodology and results so far. The presentation will conclude with a presentation of the research team's website and a chance for questions and answers.

 

"Alcohol, War, and Automobiles: Constructing Masculinity and Navigating Power in Mad Men"

Assistant Professor of English Jeff Sychterz and Adjunct Instructor of Interpersonal Communications Wes Colbath

Monday, April 15, Noon to 1 pm

University of Maine at Augusta, Bangor Campus, Eastport Hall 124

Please join Jeff Sychterz and Wes Colbath for a presentation and discussion about the TV Show Mad Men. Colbath's work focuses around the role of automobiles and "sex, privacy, and relations of power." Dr. Sychterz's work focuses on alcohol and its relationship to post war masculinity. Through both of these lenses we can develop a better understanding of popular culture research and the role of television in helping to shape our expectations related to power and masculinity. A Mad Men inspired lunch (minus the cocktails) will be provided.

 

The Psychoneuroimmunology of Mind-Body Healing"

Assistant Professor of Nursing Carey Clark

Thursday, March 14, Noon to 1 pm

University of Maine at Augusta, Katz Library

What do neuroplasticity, epigenetics, and mind modulation have to do with the stress response, your health, and your illness propensity? How are the endocrine system, nervous system, and immune system inter-connected in such a way that emotions are expressed in our body and reflected by our health status? This presentation will focus on the science of the psychophysiologic stress response as it affects the nervous system, and clarify how self care and holistic modalities decrease the nervous system's sympathetic response, while increasing the nervous system's parasymphathetic response to facilitate body-mind healing. The use of mind-body approaches may reduce or eliminate the need for many medications and facilitate lasting changes in brain physiology that protect us from future illness and discomfort. The participants will also have an opportunity to experience a relaxation exercise to facilitate their understanding of the mind-body healing process.

 

"Optimism, Pessimism and Locus of Control: How Do They Affect Your Academics?"

Professor of Psychology Charlie Grunder

Thursday, March 28, Noon to 1 pm 

University College at Rockland, Room 403

Psychologists study optimism versus pessimism and internal versus external locus of control to predict how individuals respond to stressful events. How can this framework help predict who succeeds in school? Professor of Psychology Charles Grunder explores this question in regard to student performance and concludes that prior GPA matters less than attributional style in predicting good grades, the precursor to graduation and career success.

 

 

 

 

"Mouths and Minds Wide Open: The State of Maine & Oral Cancer"

Assistant Professor of Dental Health Danielle Furgeson and Clinical Teacher Nancy Foster

Monday, March 4, Noon to 1 pm

University of Maine at Augusta, Bangor Campus, Eastport Hall Room 124

Oral cancer is on the rise in Maine and faculty at UMA are finding out more about this problem through their research. The difference between what you think you might know about oral cancer and actual trends might surprise you; oral cancer is on the rise in populations of young people, women and non-smokers. Faculty from the UMA Dental Health program share the results of their ongoing research.

 

 

elyseapantaku"Housing Discrimination and Fair Housing Tests in Maine"

Elyse Apantaku, Pine Tree Legal Foundation

Monday, February 4, Noon to 1 pm

University College at Rockland, Room 403

Under Maine and federal law, a landlord cannot refuse to rent to you, and a housing seller cannot treat you differently, because of your race, color, ancestry, religion, sex, sexual orientation, disability, welfare status or minor children. But regardless of the law, housing discrimination continues. Elyse Apantaku of Pine Tree Legal Assistance presents a colloquium in which she describes the historical context of fair housing law and current efforts to measure whether, when and why housing discrimination occurs. A presentation of results from prior housing audits will lead to discussion regarding the practicalities of carrying out a fair housing test and how a university community can support this effort.

 

Adjunct Professor Philip Gerard

 

"Should Caffeine Be Limited to Adults Only?"

Assistant Professor of Mental Health and Human Services Kim Lane

Monday, February 4, Noon to 1 pm

UMA Bangor Campus, Eastport Hall Events Room 124

America does run on caffeine. 90% of Americans consume caffeine each day. Most of us do not know how much is too much. What are the signs of caffeine intoxication? How much caffeine is in a Java Monster, a Red Bull, a Starbucks coffee, a nasal spray, a chip, etc? The energy craze is here, but at what cost to the consumer? Americans are sleeping less, eating more, working harder, and playing less. Please join Professor Kim Lane in looking at why we have become so obsessed with taking a substance to maintain a certain energy level.

 

"Science Denial, a Threatening Social Phenomenon: Reality and Response"

Adjunct Professor Philip Gerard

Thursday, January 31, Noon to 1 pm

University College at Rockland, Room 403

Recent years have seen an increase in an anti-science mentality, in some cases a full-fledged rejection of science as one of the ways of knowing about the world. This rejection crosses classes and social strata on issues ranging from public health (childhood vaccination, nutrition, health care), to educational policy (intelligent design), to critical environmental issues (climate change, species loss).

 

Drawing on more than two decades of experience as an educator and conservation biologist, University College at Rockland Adjunct Professor Philip Gerard will share his understanding of and perspective on the roots of this change. Professor Gerard's presentation is relevant to any members of the community impacted by science and its applications in society.

 

 

"A 15th-Century Life of St. Cuthbert: or, Why Read Medieval Saints’ Lives?"

 

Associate Professor of English Robert Kellerman

Wednesday, February 13, Noon to 1 pm

University of Maine at Augusta, Katz Library

Saints’ lives were among the most popular, well known, and oddest texts of the European Middle Ages. Filled with fantastic events and miracles alongside the standard biography of the saint in question, they combine local history, pop culture, theology, and Church doctrine into a form of biography that was, and remains, immensely popular. This presentation will explore what saint’s lives were and why they are essential to “reading” the Middle Ages through the medium of one saint's life: a metrical version of the Life of St. Cuthbert, printed in the mid-15th century.

 

St. Cuthbert was one of the earliest English saints (late 7th century), as well as monk and abbot of Lindisfarne. Retold over the centuries, his life accumulated a wealth of material so that when it took its 15th century form, it combined biography with fairy tale, miracles with a political history of Northumbrian Church—in short, a mishmash of everything the poet could lay his hands on about Cuthbert. We’ll explore why it took such a form, and why the form apparently did not concern medieval readers much, an issue that informs how medieval readers read texts as well as how we modern readers read them.

 

 

"From Shebeens to the Governorship: How the Irish 'Made It' in Belfast, Maine"

Associate Professor of English Kay Retzlaff

Tuesday, November 13, Noon to 1 pm

UMA Bangor Campus, Eastport Hall Room 124

Born in Ireland, Bridget Haugh McCabe died under mysterious circumstances in Belfast, Maine, on January 4, 1861. Her death brought attention to an entrepreneurial enclave of Irish immigrants cooperating with some Yankee locals who were operating an illegal liquor trade in the heart of the city. This thriving "shebeen" ran afoul of the local authorities, themselves descended from Irish immigrants. This interconnection between the old, established “lace curtain” Irish and the “bog” Irish of mid-nineteenth century Belfast illustrates the diversity of the Irish presence in Maine and disproves a number of assertions made by Irish American scholars about the Irish in America.

 

"Matters in Maine: Measuring Individual Health, Well-Being, and Life Satisfaction."

Assistant Professor of Social Science Catherine Turcotte

Wednesday, November 14, Noon to 1 pm

UMA Augusta Campus, Katz Library

While the ongoing (and many claim, deepening) economic crisis has been chronicled extensively on a national and global level, less examination has been undertaken on the welfare of residents in our local communities. Many individuals in central Maine are facing increasing challenges in obtaining and maintaining adequate housing, employment, heating, medical and dental care, and nutrition, for example, with close to one-third of Maine residents classified as poor or near-poor.

Using surveys and semi-structured interviews, residents of Augusta, Bangor, and surrounding communities were asked by students in selected Social Problems courses at UMA to assess their living standards across six domains, including self-reported life satisfaction. This presentation will introduce this ongoing project and present preliminary findings from qualitative and quantitative data. Results thus far indicate that many residents experience difficulty in acquiring adequate dental care and residential heat and encounter extended periods of unemployment. Moreover, lower levels of overall life satisfaction were found among individuals reporting more challenges to their well-being.

 

 

 

"Nurses’ Experiences of the Practice of the Peerspirit Circle Model from a Gadamerian Philosophical Hermeneutic Perspective"

 Assistant Professor of Nursing Kristen Lombard

 Thursday, October 11, Noon to 1 pm

 UMA Augusta Campus, Katz Library 

 

In a culture that has values technology, the bottom line and polar opposites, it is a challenge is to find a basis for non-hierarchical, face-to-face human interaction. How can we re-learn the human instinct to connect despite our anxieties about authenticity, confidence and fear itself?

Assistant Professor of Nursing Kristen Lombard presents her qualitative research on the viability of a collaborative "peerspirit" model in nursing with broader implications for the way we inhabit our home and work lives.

 

 

"Wild Blue Yonder: How Bangor, Maine, Decided to Reinvent a Neighborhood, an Air Base, and its Downtown."

 Lecturer in Liberal Studies Tom McCord

 Tuesday, October 16, Noon to 1 pm

 UMA Bangor Campus, Eastport Hall Room 124

 

Abstract: A convergence of opportunities, trends, money, and leadership in the early nineteen sixties convinced civic leaders in Bangor, Maine, to embark on three strikingly different urban renewal projects. While two were superficially successful, the third project, a fifty-acre clearing of the city's downtown, dramatically failed in its primary objective: It failed to stimulate retail growth, which meant that increased property tax revenues did not materialize. The presentation argues that all three urban renewal projects were highly contingent on private choices, not public incentives, and that Bangor was most successful when locally controlled decision-making coincided with private enterprise.

 

 

"Culturally-Appropriate Care: What The Youth are Saying."

 Adjunct Professor Kathleen Fox

 Thursday, October 18, Noon to 1 pm

 University College at Rockland

 

A discussion of the results of a study of mental health needs among Mohawk young adults of New York State. Findings are that youth prefer their own traditions to current "Evidence Based Treatment", which they find to be stigmatizing and irrelevant.

 


"Carol Dweck's Mindsets: A Workshop for Faculty and Students on Expanding our Potential."
 

Associate Professor of Mathematics Christine LeGore

Wednesday, October 3, Noon to 1 pm

University College at Rockland

In her book Mindset, Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck passionately espouses the importance of believing in a "growth mindset" in teaching and learning. After a brief presentation, we will consider the impact of positive and negative messages on our mindsets and how faculty and students might incorporate Dweck's insights into our daily practices.

People who wish to attend this workshop might benefit from perusing Dweck’s highly informative website (mindsetonline.com) and will have an opportunity to take a related assessment quiz.

 

 

"American Fitness from Jane Fonda to Wii Fit: Critical and Creative Explorations of Women, Exercise, and Transformation"

Assistant Professor of American Studies Sarah Hentges

Tuesday, September 25, Noon to 1 pm

UMA Bangor Campus, Eastport Hall Room 124

Dr. Hentges will share some of her critical and creative explorations of American fitness, focused on making connections between food (the UMA colloquium theme for this academic year) and fitness.  Beyond the obvious connections of food as fuel, food and fitness share some interesting dimensions that tell us much about American culture, economics, and politics.

 

Associate Professor of Philosophy Greg Fahy"Publics and Places: An Architecture of Democracy."

Associate Professor of Philosophy Greg Fahy

Wednesday, April 11, Noon to 1 pm

Katz Library, Augusta Campus

Abstract: 

This paper argues that there is a strong connection between the design of built environments in America and the quality of democratic practice that occurs within these environments. It begins by discussing the self-identification of publics as crucial for democratic practice, and argues that there is an inherently spatial component to public self-identification. In particular, suburban built environments solicit strong tendencies to withdraw into private spaces and avoid social engagement in response to social conflict. This limits the potential for any publics to self-identify and to define their interests. The paper concludes by discussing two characteristics of built environments that solicit democratic practice: axial rings that enable strangers to traverse neighborhoods and convex spaces around bunched building entrances that encourage public transactions.

 

 

Community in Communication: RAP colloquium in the Katz Library at the University of Maine at AugustaThe Deep RaP Archive:

The Research And Pedagogy program is made possible by the support of the Faculty Senate and the Office of the Provost.  If you are interested in giving a presentation at a future RAP session, please contact: