Annual Security Report for Calendar Year 2020

The information in this report is provided annually as part of the commitment of the University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) to safety and security and is in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998 (formerly the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990). This report includes information for the Augusta campus, the Bangor campus, and the UMA Centers. In 2013, the Violence Against Women Act required additional categories be tracked as part of the crime statistics. The Additional VAWA categories can be located at the end of each campus’s crime statistics.

The University is committed in its efforts to ensure that the campus remains safe and secure. To do so requires not just the efforts of the University Security department, but the cooperation and understanding of everyone at the University. We ask that everyone do their part to help protect yourself and others. Please carefully review this report and take notice of all the services available to you and then make informed decisions in regards to your personal safety while here at the University of Maine at Augusta.

Contents of this Report

  • Annual Crime Statistics
    • Augusta
    • Bangor
    • UMA Centers
  • Information Used to Compile Report
  • Campus Safety & Security
    • Crime Log
    • Access to UMA Facilities
    • Campus & Center Security
      • Augusta
      • Bangor
      • UMA Centers
    • Evacuation Procedures
      • Regrouping Areas
    • Sheltering in Place
    • Timely Reporting of Crime to the University Community (Emergency Notification)
      • UMA Alerts
    • Law Enforcement Authority and Inter-agency Relationships
  • Reporting Procedures, General Prevention & Awareness Programs
  • Alcohol & Drug Abuse
    • University Policy on Alcohol and Illegal Drugs
    • Alcoholic Beverages
    • Illegal Drugs
    • Sanctions
    • Special Rules That Apply to Employees and Students Under The Drug Free Workplace Act
  • Sex and Gender Based Discrimination and Sexual Violence
    • Sexual Assault Prevention & Education
    • Bystander Intervention
    • Risk Reduction
    • What to do if you are Sexually Assaulted or Experience Domestic Violence, Dating Violence or Stalking
    • Reporting to the University
    • Reporting to Law Enforcement
    • Confidential Resources
    • Protection Orders
    • Process Rights
    • Process Outcomes
    • Training
    • Recordkeeping and Privacy
    • Retaliation
    • Where to Get Additional Support
    • Definitions of Prohibited Conduct
      • Federal / Clery
      • Maine State Law
      • University Specific
    • Location of Sex Offender Registry

Questions concerning this document can be referred to Robert Marden, (207) 621-3103.

To obtain a paper copy of this report or if you have questions concerning this document, contact:

Robert Marden
Director of Campus Safety & Security
University of Maine at Augusta

46 University Drive

Augusta ME, 04330
(207) 621-3103

Robert.Marden@maine.edu

Crime Statistics

UMA offers a wide variety of courses using distance education technologies. UMA students using distance learning options attend classes at other University of Maine campuses as well as at the UMA Centers. Policies and procedures for these locations as well as the annual crime statistics may be obtained from the following locations:

Information Gathering and Preparation of the Annual Security Report

The Office of Campus Safety & Security compiles this report for all UMA locations. This report includes policies and procedures, as well as crime statistics for the UMA Augusta Campus and Bangor Campus. Policies and procedures for the UMA Centers can be found by clicking on one of the web links listed above.

Once a year the President sends an email notification to every current employee with a link to the UMA Accident/Incident Report form. This email contains a brief description of the University’s responsibility under the Jeanne Clery Act. It informs the employees of their responsibility to report any accident or incident using the link. The information gathered is included in the Annual Security Report as appropriate.

Once a year the staff in the Office of Campus Safety & Security contacts the local police departments in Augusta, Bangor and of each UMA Center in writing to request the required statistics under the Jeanne Clery Act.

Reports are forwarded to the Office of Campus Safety & Security throughout the year. During the preparation of the Annual Security Report, Campus Security Authorities (see below) are contacted to ensure that all reports for the year have been received by the Office of Campus Safety & Security.

A review of the statements, policies and procedures, and the programs described in the previous year’s Annual Security Report is completed annually by the appropriate departments.

Crime Log

The Office of Campus Safety & Security Maintains a Daily Crime Log of all reported crimes. This report includes the nature of the crime, date and time, general location, along with the status of the complaint. Entries or updates are made within two business days. This log is available at the Office of Campus Safety & Security (Farmhouse) upon request.

All Crimes and other emergencies must be reported to the Office of Campus Safety & Security (621-3103 or 1-877-862-1234, extension 3103).

UMA does not have a procedure in place for crimes to be reported in a confidential manner.

A list of the current Campus Security Authorities for UMA is kept with the Crime Log.

Access to UMA Facilities

The University of Maine at Augusta welcomes the opportunity to make facilities available to the University community, guests, and visitors during normal hours of operation. Access at other times will be permitted when advance arrangements are made. UMA does not maintain any on campus residences.

A detailed list of the UMA campus geography including On Campus property, Off-Campus property and adjoining Public Property is kept with the Crime Log.

Exterior doors are locked and secured after normal operating hours at all locations. All campus buildings are routinely checked.

Keys to UMA facilities are distributed to University faculty and staff whose job responsibilities require that they have access during times when the buildings might not otherwise be open. When no longer needed, keys must be returned. Lost keys present a significant security problem. In the event keys are lost, a report must be filed immediately with the Director of Campus Safety & Security for the Augusta or Bangor campus, and with the appropriate Center Director for one of the UMA Centers. Persons who find keys should promptly return them to the Office of Campus Safety & Security on the Augusta campus, the Office of Administrative Services on the Bangor campus, or to the appropriate UMA Center Director for one of the UMA Centers.

The University of Maine at Augusta does not have any officially recognized student organizations with a non-campus location.

Facility & Campus Security

Augusta –

UMA employs two security guards at the Augusta campus. Their responsibilities include patrolling the campus, assisting with campus emergencies, handling security issues, providing an escort service, and securing campus buildings.

Emergency services can be reached at the Augusta campus by dialing “911” from campus phones. On-campus courtesy phones are located in Jewett Hall, the Katz Library, the Randall Student Center and the UMA section of the Augusta Civic Center. Emergency 911 stations are located throughout the Augusta campus. When the button is pushed on a station, a blue light flashes at the top of the station and a call is automatically placed to the local 911 Dispatcher. A prerecorded message indicating the location of the call is delivered and the person needing emergency assistance is able to speak directly to the Dispatcher. Exterior lighting in parking lots and along walkways is routinely checked to ensure that all lights are in working order.

Any significant emergency or dangerous situation must be reported to Campus Security at 621-3400 on the Augusta Campus.

Bangor –

UMA employs two security guards at the Bangor campus. Their responsibilities include patrolling the campus, assisting with campus emergencies, handling security issues, providing an escort service, and securing campus buildings.

At the University of Maine at Augusta – Bangor Campus, emergency services can be reached by dialing “911.” On-campus courtesy phones are located in Eastport Hall, Belfast Hall, and the College Center. Emergency 911 stations are located throughout the Bangor campus. When the button is pushed on a station, a blue light flashes at the top of the station and a call is automatically placed to the local 911 dispatcher. A prerecorded message indicating the location of the call is delivered and the person needing emergency assistance is able to speak directly to the dispatcher. Exterior lighting in parking lots and along walkways is routinely checked to ensure that all lights are in working order.

Any significant emergency or dangerous situation must be reported to Campus Security at 262-7777 on the Bangor Campus.

UMA Centers –

Emergency services can be reached at each of the UMA Centers by dialing “911.” Exterior lighting in parking lots and along walkways is routinely checked to ensure that all lights are in working order. The local police department at each location makes routine patrols through parking lots after dark.

Note: VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) telephones will not provide Enhanced 911 information (Name, location and phone number) if you dial 9-1-1 from many of our campus phones. Dialing 9-1-1 on a VoIP phone will connect you to an emergency dispatch center, but will not automatically relay the details of your location. You will have to stay on the line to relay your location to the emergency dispatch.

Timely Reporting of Crime to the University Community (Emergency Notification)

In an effort to protect the safety of University students, faculty, staff and visitors, UMA makes timely reports to the campus community of crimes and other emergencies considered to be a threat to the community. The decision to take this action is made by anyone on the Emergency Operations team, though normally the Provost and/or the highest ranking member of Campus Safety & Security make this decision.  Campus Safety and Security will take steps to verify the legitimacy of the reported crime / emergency.  Notification occurs when a criminal action is reported that poses a potential threat and it is determined that such notification will aid in the prevention of similar occurrences.  UMA will without delay and taking into account the safety of the community determine the content of the notification and initiate the notification system, unless issuing a notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency.

The UMA Alerts system allows faculty, staff, and students to receive timely information regarding weather closures and any serious campus emergency via e-mail and/or cell phone text message. The UMA web site (www.uma.edu) posts notices of emergencies. Reports are also made using any or all of the following communication methods: verbal communication, radio and TV announcements, press releases, posted notices, class announcements, articles in newsletters, Electronic message board notifications and electronic mail.

Testing of the Emergency Notification and Timely Warning Process

The University of Maine at Augusta tests the Emergency Notification and Timely Warning process annually. The test may be announced or unannounced. The testing will be preceded by a reminder to the campus community of the UMA Alerts system, Building Evacuation and Shelter In Place procedures. The Annual Crime Report may act as this reminder.

This emergency notification requirement does not replace the timely warning requirement of the Clery Act. They differ in that the timely warning applies only to Clery-reportable crimes, while the emergency notification requirement addresses a wider range of threats (e.g. gas leaks, weather emergencies, contagious diseases, etc.).

A record of the annual test of the Emergency Notification / Timely Warning process is kept with the Crime Log.

Building Evacuation:

“Evacuation” means leaving the location of the hazard. This may involve exiting a room or building, or leaving campus, depending on the nature of the emergency. Evacuation maps are posted in each campus room and supervisors are responsible for informing employees of the evacuation plan for the building. Students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the evacuation plan posted in each classroom.

In the event of an emergency, these procedures should be followed when evacuating the building. Be aware of all the marked exits from your area and building. An emergency evacuation plan showing the building floor plan and how to get out is posted in all occupied spaces.

  1. Remain calm.
  2. Close doors and windows in your area as you exit, if safe to do so.
  3. Assist those with special needs to areas of refuge (i.e. stairwell landings) and close the fire door. Ask for their name.
  4. Walk quickly to the nearest marked exit and advise others to do the same. Do not use the elevators.
  5. Proceed to the designated regrouping area.
  6. Report the name and location of individuals waiting for assistance to Fire/Police/Security officials.
  7. Do not reenter the building.
  8. Keep all walkways and roadways clear for emergency vehicles.

Augusta Regrouping Areas

Building Regrouping Area
Jewett Hall Bennett D. Katz Library Lobby
Bennett D. Katz Library Jewett Hall Auditorium
Michael Klahr Center Jewett Hall Auditorium
Randall Student Center Bennett D. Katz Library Lobby
Fine Arts Building Jewett Hall Auditorium
Arts Building Jewett Hall Auditorium
Modular Bldg I and II Jewett Hall Auditorium
Mail Room Farmhouse
Modular 3 Farmhouse
Alumni Center Farmhouse
Robinson Hall Farmhouse
Stoddard House Farmhouse
Augusta Civic Center Farmhouse
Farmhouse Alumni Center
Ceramics Studio (Pottery Shop) Farmhouse
Handley Hall Rhines Hill Parking Lot
Stevens Hall (Hallowell) Stevens Quad
Erskine Hall (Hallowell) Stevens Quad

Bangor Regrouping Areas

Building Regrouping Area
Acadia Hall College Center Lobby
College Center Eastport Hall Huskins Lounge
Eastport Hall Belfast Hall Nottage Library
Belfast Hall Eastport Hall Huskins Lounge
Lewiston Hall Belfast Hall Nottage Library
Fitness Center Belfast Hall  Nottage Library
Bangor Hall Fitness Center
Camden Hall Fitness Center

Shelter in Place –

“Shelter in Place” means going to and remaining in a building, away from the threat. The Shelter in Place notification could be used in situations such as a Hazardous materials spill near or on Campus, or an active shooter on campus.

If directed to shelter in place:

  1. If outdoors, go inside and into a room.
  2. Close and lock the door (if possible).
  3. Close and lock all windows.
  4. Stay out of window and door openings.
  5. Turn off fans/air conditioners.
  6. Remain calm and quiet.
  7. Do not unlock doors or windows and do not exit, until directed by a public safety officer or university official.

Law Enforcement Authority and Inter-Agency Relationships

The University of Maine at Augusta does not maintain a campus law enforcement office at any of its locations. The UMA security guards do not have law enforcement authority. The University maintains a working relationship with the public safety departments in communities where its campuses are located. The appropriate University administrator reports criminal activity and campus emergencies to the local public safety department. Campus personnel assist public safety officers who respond to emergencies on any campus and when officers are investigating crimes on or near any campus.

Reporting Procedures, General Prevention & Awareness Programs

All members of the University community are encouraged to report all crimes, unsafe and/or potentially hazardous conditions. Employees are reminded periodically that all accidents and incidents are to be reported to the administration immediately. These reminders are delivered electronically through the “UMA Weekly” notification email. An annual letter from the University President is delivered to all employees reminding them of their reporting responsibility.

The information found in the UMA Department of Campus Safety & Security requires employees to report crimes and other emergencies. This information is found on the UMA Safety web page. This webpage is reviewed and updated every year.

The UMA Student Handbook encourages students to report crimes and other emergency situations and provides reporting procedures for students. General safety and security information is also found in the Student Handbook and the UMA Safety & Security web page.

All new employees are informed of the Jeanne Clery Act and of their reporting responsibilities under the Act. The University of Maine System offers an online annual safety training for all employees though UMS Academy. This training covers reporting procedures and phone numbers for use to report an emergency or safety concern.

Alcohol and Drug Abuse

The University of Maine at Augusta complies with all state and federal laws pertaining to both the possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages and the possession and use of illegal drugs. In compliance with the Drug Free Workplace Act and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments, the University publishes and distributes annually a booklet that informs all employees and students of UMA’s substance abuse policy, sanctions for violations of the policy, and state and federal alcohol and drug laws, offenses and sanctions. Policies and procedures regarding Alcohol and Drug Abuse are available for students in the Student Handbook and are as follows.

University Policy on Alcohol and Drugs

University policy recognizes that substance abuse is a complex problem that is not easily resolved solely by personal effort and may require professional assistance and/or treatment. Accordingly, each campus and System-wide Services have designated an individual to assist employees and students who seek referral for assistance with a substance-abuse problem. Students, faculty, and staff members with substance-abuse problems are encouraged to take advantage of available diagnostic, referral, counseling, and prevention services. However, employees and students availing themselves of these services will not be granted special privileges and exemptions from standard personnel practices applicable to job performance requirements and from standard academic and student conduct requirements. The University will not excuse acts of misconduct committed by employees and students whose judgment is impaired due to substance abuse.

Alcoholic Beverages

The sale, possession, and use of alcohol on campuses of the University of Maine System must comply with the laws of the state of Maine and with local campus regulations and procedures. The acquisition, possession, transportation, and consumption of alcohol by anyone under 21 years of age is prohibited by University policy.
Alcohol may be possessed or consumed on University property only by persons 21 years of age or older in their rooms or in appropriately licensed and/or approved campus facilities. Persons are expected to assume responsibility for their own behavior while drinking and must understand that being under the influence of alcohol in no way lessens their accountability to the University community.

Illegal Drugs

The possession, use, manufacture, dispensing or distribution of illegal drugs (heroin, cocaine, marijuana, LSD, steroids, etc.) is prohibited at any time on University property and as part of any University activities. “Illegal drugs” does not mean the use of drugs under a valid prescription. Employees and students known to use, possess, manufacture, dispense, or distribute illegal drugs are liable to public law-enforcement actions and University disciplinary actions.

Sanctions

Employees and students who violate the University’s policy will be subject to disciplinary action by the University. The severity of the imposed sanctions will be appropriate to the violation; possible sanctions include suspension, probation, dismissal, restitution, official censure or reprimand, referral for prosecution, participation in a rehabilitation program, and other actions the University deems appropriate.

Special Rules That Apply to Employees and Students Under The Drug Free Workplace Act

In November of 1988, the United States Congress enacted the Anti-Drug Abuse Act which contains a section called the “Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988.” This section requires organizations receiving federal grants and contracts to ensure that their workplaces are free from illegal use, possession, manufacture, dispensation, or distribution of controlled substances.

The law requires employers who receive federal funds to:

  • notify employees that drug abuse is prohibited in the workplace,
  • establish a drug-free awareness program,
  • require each employee to notify the University of any criminal drug conviction for violations occurring in the workplace, and
  • impose sanctions or remedial actions for convicted employees.

As a result of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, a court of law may suspend or terminate an individual’s eligibility for federal benefits, including student financial assistance, if that individual is convicted of certain drug offenses.

As a University employee, the Drug Free Workplace Act requires notification of one’s supervisor (for example, Department Director or Principal Investigator) if an employee is convicted of any workplace-related criminal drug violation within five calendar days of the conviction. Failure to report a conviction may be grounds for dismissal.

The University must report in writing to the contracting or granting agency within 10 calendar days of receiving notice of the conviction.

Violations of the Drug Free Workplace Act may result in:

  • disciplinary action, including dismissal
  • suspension of payments under the grant
  • suspension or termination of the grant
  • suspension or debarment of the grantee

Maine has a medical marijuana law that permits medical and recreational use and possession of marijuana under certain circumstances. However, permitting employees or students to use or possess marijuana for medical purposes on campus would violate the federal Drug Free Workplace Act. Consequently, medical or recreational use or possession of marijuana on campus is prohibited. Employees and students who are under the influence of marijuana are not exempt from normal conduct and job performance standards.

Sex and Gender Based Discrimination and Sexual Violence

The University of Maine at Augusta and University of Maine System’s policy prohibits sex and gender-based discrimination, harassment, and violence, including acts of sexual assault, dating and domestic violence, and stalking, which may also constitute crimes. While UMA and the University of Maine System’s policy uses different standards and definitions than Maine’s law, sex and gender-based incidents often overlap with the crimes of rape, sexual assault, stalking, dating violence, and domestic violence.

Acts of violence and harassment based on sex or gender, including sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression, may also constitute crimes. Individuals who have experienced incidents involving one or more of these behaviors are protected by federal laws, specifically Title IX, and the Clery Act, which mandates the contents of this report.

Sexual Assault Prevention Education

Educational efforts to promote the awareness of rape, acquaintance rape, and other forcible and non-forcible sex offenses include the following initiatives:

  1. Mandatory “Get Inclusive” online training.  “Get Inclusive” is an interactive program designed to educate about the prevention of sexual assault, dating or domestic violence, and stalking while helping each campus meet Campus SAVE Act (VAWA) and Title IX education mandates.  This training is required for all incoming students (first time in college, and transfer students) and employees of the University of Maine System. All students are encouraged to receive the training.
  2. Educational activities include informational displays and brochures, bulletin boards, student newsletter tips, student-life supported programs, including Lunch & Learns, and regular sharing of reporting information.
  3. Information for related community agencies are available in display racks and posted on bulletin boards.

Bystander Intervention

UMA offers a range of campaigns, strategies, and initiatives to promote awareness, education, risk reduction, and prevention in an effort to reduce the frequency of sex or gender-based discrimination, harassment, and violence amongst members of the campus community.

It is the policy of the University to offer programming to identify and prevent domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault (including stranger and known offender assaults), and stalking each year.

Educational programs are offered to raise awareness for all incoming students and employees and are often conducted during new student and new employee orientation and throughout an incoming student’s first semester. New students are directed to complete the online program “Get Inclusive” as part of their orientation process. Awareness, response and some bystander intervention information is also included in UMA’s Online New Student Orientation.

Programs and other campaigns offered throughout the year to all students and employees include strong messages regarding not just awareness, but also primary prevention (including normative messaging, environmental management, and bystander intervention), and discuss institutional policies on sex or gender-based discrimination, harassment, and violence as well as the Maine definitions of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and consent in reference to sexual activity.

Programs also offer information on risk reduction that strives to empower individuals who experience these incidents, how to recognize warning signs, and how to avoid potential attacks, and do so without biased approaches. Programs are informed by evidence-based research and/or are assessed for their effectiveness.

Bystander engagement is encouraged through safe and positive intervention techniques and by empowering third-party intervention and prevention such as calling for help, using intervention-based apps, identifying allies, and/or creating distractions.

Bystander empowerment training highlights the need for those who intervene to ensure their own safety in the intervention techniques they choose and motivates them to intervene as stakeholders in the safety of the community when others might choose to be bystanders.

Information on Risk Reduction

Risk reduction means options designed to decrease perpetration and bystander inaction, and to increase empowerment for victims in order to promote safety and to help individuals and communities address conditions that facilitate violence.

While victim-blaming is never appropriate, and UMA fully recognizes that only those who commit sexual or other violence are responsible for their actions, UMA provides the suggestions that follow to help individuals reduce their risk of being victimized and their risk of committing acts of sexual misconduct.

Reducing Personal Risk

  • Make any limits/boundaries you may have known as early as possible.
  • Clearly and firmly articulate consent or lack of consent.
  • Remove yourself, if possible, from an aggressor’s physical presence.
  • Reach out for help, either from someone who is physically nearby or by calling someone. People around you may be waiting for a signal that you need help.
  • Take affirmative responsibility for your alcohol and/or drug consumption. Alcohol and drugs can increase your vulnerability to sexual victimization.
  • Look out for your friends, and ask them to look out for you. Respect them, and ask them to respect you, but be willing to challenge each other about high-risk choices.

Reducing the Risk of Being Accused of Sexual Misconduct

  • Show your potential partner respect if you are in a position of initiating sexual behavior.
  • If a potential partner says “no,” accept it and don’t push. If you want a “yes,” ask for it, and don’t proceed without clear permission.
  • Clearly communicate your intentions to your potential sexual partners, and give them a chance to share their intentions and/or boundaries with you.
  • Respect personal boundaries. If you are unsure what’s OK in any interaction, ask.
  • Avoid ambiguity. Don’t make assumptions about consent, about whether someone is attracted to you, how far you can go with that person, or if the individual is physically and mentally able to consent. If you have questions or are unclear, you don’t have consent.
  • Don’t take advantage of the fact that someone may be under the influence of drugs or alcohol, even if that person chose to become that way. Others’ loss of control does not put you in control.
  • Be on the lookout for mixed messages. That should be a clear indication to stop and talk about what your potential partner wants or doesn’t want to happen. That person may be undecided about how far to go with you, or you may have misread a previous signal.
  • Respect the timeline for sexual behaviors with which others are comfortable, and understand that they are entitled to change their minds.
  • Recognize that even if you don’t think you are intimidating in any way, your potential partner may be intimidated by or fearful of you, perhaps because of your sex, physical size, or a position of power or authority you may hold.
  • Do not assume that someone’s silence or passivity is an indication of consent. Pay attention to verbal and non-verbal signals to avoid misreading intentions.
  • Understand that consent to one type of sexual behavior does not automatically grant consent to other types of sexual behaviors. If you are unsure, stop and ask.
  • Understand that exerting power and control over another through sex is unacceptable conduct.

What to do if you are Sexually Assaulted or Experience Domestic Violence, Dating Violence or Stalking

If you experience sex- or gender-based discrimination, harassment, or violence; or incidents of rape, acquaintance rape, sexual assault, sexual harassment, stalking, dating violence, or domestic violence, some or all of these safety suggestions may guide you after an incident has occurred:

  1. Go to a safe place and speak with someone you trust. Tell this person what happened. If there is any immediate danger, call 911.
  2. Consider securing immediate professional support (e.g., counseling, victim advocacy, medical services, etc.) to assist you in the crisis.
  3. If you are on either the Augusta or Bangor campuses during regular business hours, you may go to Student Support and Development to speak with counseling services for support and guidance. UMA’s licensed, clinical counselors are confidential resources. After regular business hours, off-campus, or in any situation where an individual wishes, local resources are also available and may be able to provide confidential assistance, which you can locate through the Maine Coalition to End Domestic Violence and the Maine Coalition Against Sexual Assault.
  4. For your safety and well-being, immediate medical attention is encouraged. Further, being examined as soon as possible, ideally within 120 hours, is important in the case of rape or sexual assault. Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners (also called SAFE nurses) are available throughout Maine to ensure you receive proper care. In Augusta, individuals can go to MaineGeneral, and in Bangor, to St. Joseph’s Hospital. The hospital will arrange for a specific medical examination at no charge or can work with you to arrange state reimbursement. You do not need to have insurance to receive a SAFE exam.
  • To preserve evidence, it is recommended that you do not bathe, shower, douche, eat, drink, smoke, brush your teeth, urinate, defecate, or change clothes before receiving medical attention. Even if you have already taken any of these actions, you are still encouraged to have prompt medical care, and evidence may still be recoverable.
  • In Maine, individuals who seek medical care at a hospital for instances of sexual assault or domestic abuse will be offered the presence and support of a specially trained advocate. You may also bring personal support if you so choose.
  • You may wish to bring a full change of clothes to the hospital, should circumstances permit, so that if you decide to leave items as evidence, you have a full set of your own clothes to change into as that may make you more comfortable. Maine hospitals and local advocacy agencies also can supply a change of clothing as needed.
  • Typically, if police are involved or will be involved, they will obtain evidence from the scene, and it is best to leave things undisturbed until their arrival. They will gather bedding, linens or unlaundered clothing, and any other pertinent items that may be used for evidence. It is best to allow police to secure items in evidence containers, but if you are involved in transmission of items of evidence, such as to the hospital, secure them in a clean paper bag or clean bed sheet to avoid contamination.
  • If you have physical injuries, photograph or have them photographed, with a date stamp on the photo. You may be asked to photograph injuries at different stages, such as bruises develop or during the healing process.
  • Record the names of any witnesses and their contact information. This information may be helpful as proof of a crime, to obtain an order of protection, or to offer proof of a campus policy violation.
  • If you have access to information that could help document the incident, such as text messages, postings to your social media, etc., do not delete. If you wish to block a party on social media, take screenshots of any communication that could be evidence prior to blocking the individual.
  • Record any details (e.g., physical description, names, license plate number, car description, etc.) if possible.
  1. If you obtain external orders of protection (e.g., restraining orders, injunctions, protection from abuse), please notify Campus Security or the campus Title IX Coordinator so that those orders can be observed on campus.
  2. Even after the immediate crisis has passed, consider seeking support from confidential UMA Counseling Services. Students at any location are welcome to seek such support, and distance options are available through phone and Zoom appointments.  It is also recommended that you connect with the your local sexual assault or domestic violence agency for 100% confidential services.
  3. Contact the Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Laura Rodas, if you need assistance with university related concerns, such as no-contact orders or other supportive measures. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator will also assist in any needed advocacy for students who wish to obtain protective or restraining orders from local authorities. UMA is able to offer reasonable academic support, changes to living arrangements, transportation resources or modifications, safety escorts, no contact orders, counseling services access, and other supports and resources as needed. UMA is able to offer information about legal assistance, visa/immigration assistance, and student financial aid considerations for victims.

Reporting to Law Enforcement

It is the policy of the University not to notify local/campus law enforcement when sex or gender-based discrimination, harassment, or violence occurs, unless a Complainant wishes or there is an emergency threat to health or safety.

Complainants have the option to notify law enforcement directly, or to be assisted in doing so by campus authorities. If requested, campus officials can facilitate reporting to campus or local law enforcement but may also respect a Complainant’s request not to do so.

University Reporting

In the event that sex or gender-based discrimination, harassment, or violence or the crimes of sexual assault, stalking, dating violence, or domestic violence do occur, UMA takes the matter very seriously.

UMA employs supportive and protective measures such as no contact orders or emergency removal in cases in which a violence risk assessment indicates such action is warranted.

If a student is accused of sex or gender-based discrimination, harassment, or violence, they are subject to action in accordance with the University of Maine System Policy on in the UMA Student Handbook. A student wishing to officially report such an incident may do so by contacting Deputy TIX Coordinator for Students for instances involving students only, or Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Employees for instances involving guests of the University or University employees. Complaints may also be filed with the University of Maine System Title IX Coordinator.

Anyone with knowledge about sex- or gender-based discrimination, harassment, or violence, or the crimes of rape, sexual assault, sexual harassment, stalking, dating violence, or domestic violence is encouraged to report it immediately.

Supportive and protective measures for individuals who have experienced these incidents are available from the campus whether the individual chooses to report to local and/or campus law enforcement, and irrespective of whether the individual pursues a formal complaint through the University resolution process.

Confidential Resources

An individual who seeks completely confidential assistance may do so by speaking with professionals who have legally protected confidentiality. At UMA, very few individuals are considered Confidential – this includes licensed, clinical counselors acting in that capacity, and medical personnel such as athletic trainers. Information shared with these resources will remain confidential and will not be shared with the University, or anyone else without expressed, written permission of the individual seeking services unless required by law or court order. All other faculty and staff of UMA are considered “Title IX Mandated Reporters” and must report a disclosure to the Deputy Title IX Coordinator.

Protection Orders

The University of Maine at Augusta does not issue orders of protection. Orders of protection, restraining orders, injunctions, or similar lawful orders may be obtained through the court system and can be enforced by the University. Individuals who have obtained a protection order are encouraged to provide a copy to Campus Security or their Student Services Coordinator or Center Director as soon as possible following the issuance to ensure full enforcement.

Although the University does not issue orders of protection, individuals may request that UMA issue an administrative No Contact Order. Upon request, a determination will be made by the University whether to issue an administrative No Contact Order directive.

For information regarding how to obtain a protection order, see the Maine Court’s guide, seek the assistance of a local domestic violence or sexual assault resource center, or contact UMA’s Deputy Title IX Coordinator for students or for employees.

Process Rights

A summary of rights, options, supports, and procedures, in the form of this document, is provided to all Complainants, whether they are students, employees, guests, or visitors.

When appropriate upon receipt of a formal complaint, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator will initiate a prompt, fair, and impartial process, commencing with an investigation, which may lead to the imposition of sanctions for a Respondent based upon a preponderance of evidence (what is more likely than not).

Procedures detailing the investigation and resolution processes of the University of Maine System can be found online in the Student Conduct Code or the UMS Policy on Sex Discrimination….  The Title IX Coordinator is ultimately responsible for assuring in all cases that the behavior is brought to an end, the University acts to reasonably prevent its recurrence, and the effects on the Complainant and the community are remedied.

All parties are entitled to a process which:

  • Is prompt, fair, and impartial from initial investigation to final result, including being:
    • Completed within reasonably prompt timeframes, including allowing for the extension of timeframes for good cause with written notice to the parties of the delay and the reason for the delay;
    • Conducted in a manner that is consistent with the institution’s policies and transparent to the parties;
    • Given timely notice of meetings at which the parties (one or all) may be present;
    • Given timely provision to the parties and any appropriate officials of equal access to any information that will be used during informal and formal disciplinary meetings and hearings; and is
    • Conducted by officials who do not have a conflict of interest or bias for or against the any of the parties
  • Is conducted by administrators who, at minimum, receive annual training on:
    • Issues related to dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking; and
    • How to conduct an investigation and hearing process the protects the safety of the parties and promotes accountability
    • Allows all parties the same opportunities to have others present during any institutional disciplinary proceeding, including the opportunity to be accompanied to any related meeting or proceeding by the advisor of their choice
    • Does not limit the choice of advisor or presence for any party in any meeting or institutional disciplinary proceeding; however, the institution may establish regarding the extent to which the advisor may participate in the proceedings, as long as the restrictions apply equally to all parties
  • Provides for simultaneous written notification to all parties of:
    • The result of any institutional disciplinary proceeding that arises from an allegation of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking;
    • The institution’s procedures for the parties to appeal the result of the institutional disciplinary proceeding, if such procedures are available;
    • Any change to the result; and
    • When such results become final
  • Prohibits retaliation

Process Outcomes

For offenses including sex or gender-based discrimination, harassment, and violence, which typically include the crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, sanctions range from warning to dismissal.

Serious and violent incidents and acts of sexual assault usually result in suspension, dismissal, or termination of employment.

Knowingly providing false or misleading information to investigators can result in additional consequences under the  Student Conduct Code.

Training

The UMS Title IX Coordinator is also responsible for assuring that training is conducted annually for all institution-provided advisors, investigators, decision-makers, and appeal decision-makers involved in the resolution of formal complaints through a process which ensures the safety of all parties and promotes accountability.

Training will focus on sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, sexual harassment, retaliation, and other behaviors that can be forms of sex or gender-based discrimination, harassment, or violence covered by Title IX and Clery Act.

Recordkeeping and Privacy

The University records of investigations and resolutions are maintained in privacy in accordance with the institution’s record retention policy for a minimum of seven years.  Information is shared internally between administrators who need to know in order to complete their job duties.

When information must be shared to permit the investigation to move forward, the parties will be informed. Privacy of the records specific to the investigation is maintained in accordance with Maine law and the federal FERPA statute. Information pertaining to FERPA rights for UMA students may be found here. Any public release of information needed to comply with the open crime logs or timely warning provisions of the Clery Act will not include the names of Complainant or information that could easily lead to a Complainant’s identification.

Additionally, the University maintains privacy in relation to any supportive measures afforded to a Complainant, except to the extent necessary to provide the supportive measures. Typically, if faculty members or administrators are asked to provide supportive measures for a specific student, they are told that such measures are necessary under Title IX or the Clery Act, but they are not given any details of the incident, or what kind of incident it is.

Irrespective of state law or public records access provisions, information about Complainants is maintained privately in accordance with Title IX and FERPA.

In any complaint of sex or gender-based discrimination, harassment, or violence covered under Title IX and/or the Clery Act, the Complainant and Respondent are entitled to the same opportunities for a support person of their choice throughout and to fully participate in the process, including any meeting, conference, hearing, appeal, or other procedural action.

The role of Advisors is described in detail in the Title IX policy. The parties will receive written notification of the allegations as well as any hearing outcome; they will also be afforded opportunities to review and respond to the investigation report before it is finalized and again before a hearing.

Delivery of written notifications to the parties will occur simultaneously (without undue delay between notifications). All parties will be informed of the University’s appeal processes, and their rights to exercise a request for appeal. Should any change in outcome occur prior to finalization, all parties will be timely informed in writing, and will be notified when the results of the resolution process become final.

Retaliation

Both Title IX and the Clery Act provide protections for whistleblowers who bring allegations of non-compliance with the Clery Act and/or Title IX to the attention of appropriate campus administrators.

The University of Maine at Augusta does not retaliate against those who raise concerns of non-compliance. Any concerns should be brought to the immediate attention of the campus Deputy Title IX Coordinator, the University of Maine System Title IX Coordinator, and/or to officials of the U.S. Department of Education.

MANDATED REPORTING

All University of Maine at Augusta employees (with the exception of licensed, clinical counselors and their interns, as applicable) are mandated reporters for all the details of which they are aware about an incident (recent or historic). They share this information with the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy. Giving a mandated reporter notice of an incident constitutes official notice to the institution. Incidents of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence and/or stalking will be taken seriously when official notice is given to the institution. Such incidents will be investigated (if involving a community member such as another student or staff) and resolved in a prompt and equitable manner under the university’s resolution procedures.

Individuals may request confidentiality and/or that the Title IX Coordinator/Deputy provide remedies and resources without initiating a formal resolution process. The coordinator will weigh requests for confidentiality against the institutional need to address and remedy discrimination under Title IX. Generally, the university will be able to respect reporting parties’ wishes, unless it believes there is a threat to the community based on the use of weapons, violence, pattern, predation, or threatening conduct by the person being accused.

UMA will offer available resources, supports, and remedies regardless of whether any request for confidentiality is granted. Individuals are not obligated to pursue formal resolution in order to access the resources that are available. If the university decides that it is obligated to pursue a formal resolution based on the notice given, parties are not obligated to participate in the resolution process. However, the ability of university to enforce our policies or provide some remedies may be limited as a result of one’s decision not to participate.

INCIDENTS INVOLVING MINORS

Please be aware that institutional duties with respect to minors (those under the age of 18) may require reporting incidents to state agencies and/or local law enforcement. As a result, confidentiality cannot be guaranteed in incidents involving minors.

Definitions of Prohibited Conduct

The University prohibits the crimes of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking as defined by Federal Clery regulations and Maine State law as follows:

Federal Clery Regulations

Dating Violence

Dating violence is violence committed against a person by an individual who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with that person. Whether a dating relationship exists is determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

Domestic Violence

A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed—

By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;

  • By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common;
  • By a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner;
  • By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred, or
  • By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.
Sexual Assault
  • Sexual assault means an offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape.
  • Rape is the penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
  • Fondling is the touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
  • Incest is sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
  • Statutory rape is sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.
Stalking
  • Stalking is engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to—
    (A) Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or
    (B) Suffer substantial emotional distress.

Maine State Law

Maine law defines the crimes of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking differently than the federal Clery regulations. The State of Maine definitions of these crimes and of consent are as follows:

Dating Violence

Intentionally, knowingly or recklessly causing bodily injury or offensive physical contact to another person.

Domestic Violence

Intentionally, knowingly or recklessly causing bodily injury or offensive physical contact to another person and the victim is a spouse or domestic partner or former spouse or former domestic partner, an individual presently or formerly living together as a spouse, a natural parent of the same child, adult household member related by consanguinity or affinity or minor children of a household member when the defendant is an adult household member and, individuals presently or formerly living together and individuals who are or were sexual partners. Holding oneself out to be a spouse is not necessary to constitute “living as spouses.” For purposes of this definition, “domestic partners” means 2 unmarried adults who are domiciled together under long-term arrangements that evidence a commitment to remain responsible indefinitely for each other’s welfare.

Sexual Assault

In Maine, a person is guilty of gross sexual assault if that person engages in a sexual act with another person and:

  • The other person submits as a result of compulsion.
  • The other person, not the actor’s spouse, has not in fact attained the age of 14 years.
  • The other person, not the actor’s spouse, has not in fact attained 12 years of age.
  • A person is guilty of gross sexual assault if that person engages in a sexual act with another person and:
  • The actor has substantially impaired the other person’s power to appraise or control the other person’s sexual acts by furnishing, administering or employing drugs, intoxicants or other similar means.
  • The actor compels or induces the other person to engage in the sexual act by any threat.
  • The other person suffers from mental disability that is reasonably apparent or known to the actor, and which in fact renders the other person substantially incapable of appraising the nature of the contact involved or of understanding that the person has the right to deny or withdraw consent.
  • The other person is unconscious or otherwise physically incapable of resisting and has not consented to the sexual act.
  • The other person, not the actor’s spouse, is under official supervision as a probationer, a parolee, a sex offender on supervised release, a prisoner on supervised community confinement status or a juvenile on community reintegration status or is detained in a hospital, prison or other institution, and the actor has supervisory or disciplinary authority over the other person.
  • The other person, not the actor’s spouse, has not in fact attained the age of 18 years and is a student enrolled in a private or public elementary, secondary or special education school, facility or institution and the actor is a teacher, employee or other official having instructional, supervisory or disciplinary authority over the student.
  • The other person, not the actor’s spouse, has not attained the age of 18 years and is a resident in or attending a children’s home, child care facility, facility operated by a family child care provider, children’s residential care facility, drug treatment center, youth camp licensed under Title 22, section 2495 or similar school, facility or institution regularly providing care or services for children, and the actor is a teacher, employee or other person having instructional, supervisory or disciplinary authority over the other person.
  • The other person has not in fact attained the age of 18 years and the actor is a parent, stepparent, foster parent, guardian or other similar person responsible for the long-term care and welfare of that other person.
  • The actor is a psychiatrist, a psychologist or licensed as a social worker or purports to be a psychiatrist, a psychologist or licensed as a social worker to the other person and the other person, not the actor’s spouse, is a current patient or client of the actor.
  • The actor owns, operates or is an employee of an organization, program or residence that is operated, administered, licensed or funded by the Department of Health and Human Services and the other person, not the actor’s spouse, receives services from the organization, program or residence and the organization, program or residence recognizes the other person as a person with an intellectual disability or autism. It is an affirmative defense to prosecution under this paragraph that the actor receives services for an intellectual disability or autism or is a person with an intellectual disability, as defined in Title 34-B, section 5001, subsection 3, or autism, as defined in Title 34-B, section 6002.
  • The actor owns, operates or is an employee of an organization, program or residence that is operated, administered, licensed or funded by the Department of Health and Human Services and the other person, not the actor’s spouse, receives services from the organization, program or residence and suffers from a mental disability that is reasonably apparent or known to the actor.
  • The actor is employed to provide care to a dependent person, who is not the actor’s spouse or domestic partner and who is unable to perform self-care because of advanced age or physical or mental disease, disorder or defect. For the purposes of this paragraph, “domestic partners” means 2 unmarried adults who are domiciled together under a long-term arrangement that evidences a commitment to remain responsible indefinitely for each other’s welfare.
Unlawful Sexual Touching

A person is guilty of unlawful sexual touching if the actor intentionally subjects another person to any sexual touching and:

  • The other person has not expressly or impliedly acquiesced in the sexual touching.
  • The other person is unconscious or otherwise physically incapable of resisting and has not consented to the sexual touching.
  • The other person, not the actor’s spouse, is in fact less than 14 years of age and the actor is at least 5 years older.
  • The other person suffers from a mental disability that is reasonably apparent or known to the actor that in fact renders the other person substantially incapable of appraising the nature of the touching involved or of understanding that the other person has the right to deny or withdraw consent.
  • The other person, not the actor’s spouse, is under official supervision as a probationer, a parolee, a sex offender on supervised release, a prisoner on supervised community confinement status or a juvenile on community reintegration status or is detained in a hospital, prison or other institution and the actor has supervisory or disciplinary authority over the other person.
  • The other person, not the actor’s spouse, is in fact less than 18 years of age and is a student enrolled in a private or public elementary, secondary or special education school, facility or institution and the actor is a teacher, employee or other official having instructional, supervisory or disciplinary authority over the student.
  • The other person is in fact less than 18 years of age and the actor is a parent, stepparent, foster parent, guardian or other similar person responsible for the long-term general care and welfare of that other person.
  • The other person submits as a result of compulsion.
  • The actor owns, operates or is an employee of an organization, program or residence that is operated, administered, licensed or funded by the Department of Health and Human Services and the other person, not the actor’s spouse, receives services from the organization, program or residence and the organization, program or residence recognizes that other person as a person with an intellectual disability or autism. It is an affirmative defense to prosecution under this paragraph that the actor receives services for an intellectual disability or autism or is a person with an intellectual disability, as defined in Title 34-B, section 5001, subsection 3, or autism, as defined in Title 34-B, section 6002.
  • The other person, not the actor’s spouse, is in fact less than 18 years of age and is a student enrolled in a private or public elementary, secondary or special education school, facility or institution and the actor, who is at least 21 years of age, is a teacher, employee or other official in the school district, school union, educational unit, school, facility or institution in which the student is enrolled.
  • The actor is a psychiatrist, a psychologist or licensed as a social worker or purports to be a psychiatrist, a psychologist or licensed as a social worker to the other person and the other person, not the actor’s spouse, is a current patient or client of the actor.
  • The actor owns, operates or is an employee of an organization, program or residence that is operated, administered, licensed or funded by the Department of Health and Human Services and the other person, not the actor’s spouse, receives services from the organization, program or residence and suffers from a mental disability that is reasonably apparent or known to the actor.
  • The actor is employed to provide care to a dependent person, who is not the actor’s spouse or domestic partner and who is unable to perform self-care because of advanced age or physical or mental disease, disorder or defect. For the purposes of this paragraph, “domestic partners” means 2 unmarried adults who are domiciled together under a long-term arrangement that evidences a commitment to remain responsible indefinitely for each other’s welfare.
Sexual Abuse of a Minor

A person is guilty of sexual abuse of a minor if:

  • The person engages in a sexual act with another person, not the actor’s spouse, who is either 14 or 15 years of age and the actor is at least 5 years older than the other person.
  • The person violates paragraph A and the actor knows that the other person is related to the actor within the 2nd degree of consanguinity.
  • The person violates paragraph A and the actor is at least 10 years older than the other person.
  • The person is at least 21 years of age and engages in a sexual act with another person, not the actor’s spouse, who is either 16 or 17 years of age and is a student enrolled in a private or public elementary, secondary or special education school, facility or institution and the actor is a teacher, employee or other official in the school district, school union, educational unit, school, facility or institution in which the student is enrolled.
  • The person violates paragraph C and the actor knows that the student is related to the actor within the 2nd degree of consanguinity.
  • The person violates paragraph C and the actor is at least 10 years older than the student.
Incest

A person is guilty of incest if the person is at least 18 years of age and:

Engages in sexual intercourse with another person who the actor knows is related to the actor within the 2nd degree of consanguinity.

It is a defense to a prosecution under this section that, at the time the actor engaged in sexual intercourse with the other person, the actor was legally married to the other person.

Stalking

A person is guilty of stalking if:

  • The actor intentionally or knowingly engages in a course of conduct directed at or concerning a specific person that would cause a reasonable person:

(1) To suffer serious inconvenience or emotional distress;
(2) To fear bodily injury or to fear bodily injury to a close relation;
(3) To fear death or to fear the death of a close relation;
(4) To fear damage or destruction to or tampering with property; or
(5) To fear injury to or the death of an animal owned by or in the possession and control of that specific person.

Non-Consent

It is not consent to sexual activity if:

  • The injury inflicted or the injury threatened was such as to endanger life or to cause serious bodily injury.
  • The conduct and the injury are not reasonably foreseeable hazards of joint participation in a lawful athletic contest or competitive sport; o
  • The conduct and the injury are reasonably not foreseeable hazards of an occupation or profession or of medical or scientific experimentation conducted by recognized methods, and the persons subjected to such conduct or injury have not been made aware of the risks involved prior to giving consent.
  • It is given by a person who is declared by a statute or by a judicial decision to be legally incompetent to authorize the conduct charged to constitute the crime, and such incompetence is manifest or known to the actor;
  • It is given by a person who, by reason of intoxication, physical illness, mental illness or mental defect, including, but not limited to, dementia and other cognitive impairments, or youth, is manifestly unable, or known by the defendant to be unable, to make a reasonable judgment as to the nature or harmfulness of the conduct charged to constitute the crime; or
  • It is induced by force, duress or deception or undue influence.

University Definitions

Consent:

An individual’s agreement to engage in sexual activity.

  1. Consent must be:
    1. Informed, freely, and actively given, and consist of a mutually agreeable and understandable exchange of words or actions.
    2. Clear, knowing and voluntary.
    3. Active, not passive.
  2. Consent may be withdrawn at any time.
  3. Silence, in and of itself, cannot be interpreted as consent.
  4. Consent can be given by words or actions, as long as those words or actions create mutually understandable clear permission regarding willingness to engage in (and conditions of) sexual activity.
  5. Past consent does not imply future consent.
  6. Consent to engage in one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to engage in any other sexual activity.
  7. Consent to engage in sexual activity with one person does not imply consent to engage in sexual activity with any other person.
  8. There is no consent when the exchange involves unwanted physical force, coercion, intimidation and/or threats.
  9. If an individual is mentally or physically incapacitated or impaired such that one cannot understand the fact, nature, or extent of the sexual situation, and the Incapacitation or impairment is known or should be known to a Reasonable Person, there is no consent. This includes conditions resulting from alcohol or drug consumption, or being asleep, or unconscious.
  10. Consent is not valid if the person is too young to consent to sexual activity under Maine law, even if the minor wanted to engage in the activity.

More information can be located at the following sites:

Location of Sex Offender Registry

In accordance with the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, information concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained at:

Maine State Police, Bureau of Identification
Sex Offender Registry
http://sor.informe.org/sor/