It is the intention of The University of Maine at Augusta that every degree graduate will be prepared to function in our society as an effective and informed citizen. To this end, the faculty has designed a set of minimum expectations that students are expected to satisfy to be an educated person. These aspirations are defined by core skills, competencies, and abilities as well as knowledge based learning experiences that are the grounds for the General Education Requirements.

General Education is the bedrock of a student’s educational experiences at UMA. In the first years of study, students will be introduced to the core skills, competencies, and abilities in General Education courses but will continue to encounter, build upon and demonstrate mastery of General Education outcomes throughout their respective programs of study.

The Educated Person

University graduates are reflective, demonstrate integrity, and can thrive and contribute as members of contemporary societies.  They demonstrate a well-informed understanding of their place in the natural and cultural worlds. They value both historical and prospective perspectives. They are self-aware, think clearly, and have strong collaborative, problem finding and solving skills.

They are prepared to contribute to the knowledge of their field, perform competently in their work and have a sense of personal and social responsibility. They value imaginative, practical and life-long inquiry and learning. Graduates have demonstrated core literacies described in UMA’s General Education Requirements.

Program Level Outcomes and Indicators:

The UMA graduate will demonstrate the skills to write clearly and effectively. Each baccalaureate degree program is expected to include two writing intensive courses (e.g. ENG 101 and one other) with one being at the upper division. Associate degree programs also require a minimum of two writing intensive courses.

Indicators

The UMA graduate will be able to:

        1. Write effectively in the following formats: essay, research report, and literature review.
        2. Organize and manipulate sentences, paragraphs and documents to achieve coherence and clarity, using correct diction and grammar.
        3. Find, evaluate, integrate, and cite sources, using an appropriate citation style.
        4. Evaluate the needs, background, and values of an audience and adapt the writing accordingly.
        5. Revise and edit written documents as well as produce documents in electronic format.
        6. Demonstrate an understanding of the vocabulary used in the academic discipline of rhetoric.
        7. Demonstrate an understanding of and effectively employ the vocabulary of one’s major and/or minor when writing discipline-specific documents.

The UMA graduate will be able to communicate clearly and effectively in a variety of settings.

Indicators

The UMA graduate will be able to:

  1. Organize and present complex material at appropriate levels of abstraction and technical detail for the audience.
  2. Communicate clearly, concisely, and effectively with clarity, tone, diction, gesture, affect, volume, and presence suitable to the situation.
  3. Process information with others in a productive manner as well as practice active and appropriate listening skills.
  4. Evaluate the needs, background, and values of an audience and adjust communications as necessary.
  5. Make a persuasive and logical case for a plan of action and/or a particular point of view.
  6. Recognize the strengths, weaknesses, and assumptions of oral arguments.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of the vocabulary used in the academic discipline of oral communications.
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of and effectively employ the vocabulary of one’s major and/or minor in oral discourse.

The UMA graduate will possess competence in quantitative reasoning.

Indicators

The UMA graduate will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a variety of problem-solving strategies needed to analyze quantitative problems and determine appropriate solutions.
  2. Evaluate practical quantitative problems and translate them into appropriate mathematical statements, and their solutions.
  3. “Use technology appropriately to assist in representation, organization, and data collection,” as per the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Principles and Standards 2000.
  4. Use statistical and numerical data and sound reasoning skills to discuss effectively and write convincing mathematical arguments.
  5. Perform arithmetic operations, develop relationships between abstract variables and concrete applications, recognize mathematical functions, and draw appropriate conclusions from numerical information.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of and effectively employ the language and vocabulary used in the academic discipline of mathematics.

The UMA graduate will demonstrate an ability to apply scientific knowledge and methodologies to practical problems and issues related to personal and societal needs.

Indicators

The UMA graduate will be able to:

  1. Work effectively with others to analyze scientific problems and apply scientific methodologies.
  2. Articulate the relationships among observed phenomena and the scientific principles those observations inform.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of natural diversity and of how knowledge about the natural world is organized.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of laws, theories, models, and the effect of new technologies used in analyzing the natural world.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the dynamic nature of scientific inquiry.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of the unifying concepts and processes that transcend all scientific disciplines. These are:
    1. Causality and consequence
    2. Dynamic equilibrium
    3. Scale and proportion
    4. Change and evolution
    5. Evidence and explanation
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationships of human beings with the natural world.
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of the vocabulary used in at least one of the scientific academic disciplines.

The UMA graduate will understand how anthropology, sociology, psychology, political science, geography, and/or economics shape culture.

Indicators

The UMA graduate will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of basic theories within one or more social science, including anthropology, psychology, political science, sociology, economics, and geography.
  2. Acknowledge the variability and complexity of human societies and cultures.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of social science information resources available through the library as well as other information sources.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of social systems, including their biological and psychological determinants.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of social and cultural value systems.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of the social institutions that shape our society.
  7. Apply social science perspectives, research, and information to other disciplines and professional studies.
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of the vocabulary used in one of the social science disciplines.

UMA courses that meet the Social Science outcome:

  • ANT 1xx any 100-level Anthropology course
  • ECO 1xx any 100-level Economics course
  • ECO 201 Macroeconomics
  • ECO 202 Microeconomics
  • JUS 1xx any 100-level Justice Studies course
  • POS 1xx any 100-level Political Science course
  • PSY 1xx any 100-level Psychology course
  • SOC 1xx any 100-level Sociology course
  • SSC 1xx any 100-level Social Science course

The UMA graduate will exhibit an understanding of ideas, events cultures and languages through which societies have evolved.

Indicators

The UMA graduate will be able to:

  1. Evaluate, analyze and compare significant texts, using historical contexts and a variety of cultural perspectives.
  2. Describe and analyze how texts reflect the culture(s) that produced them within a global context.
  3. Analyze and interpret the ideas of “value” and “meaning” from a variety of humanities perspectives.
  4. Articulate and defend a thoughtful assessment of these ideas.
  5. Interpret meaning from a variety of media and construct, as well as appreciate alternative interpretations.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of the vocabulary used in one or more of the disciplines within the humanities (e.g., literary or historical terminology).

UMA courses that meet the Humanities requirement:

  • AME xxx any American Studies course
  • ARH 105 History of Art & Architecture I
  • ARH 106 History of Art & Architecture II
  • DRA xxx any Drama course
  • ENG xxx any English course (except ENG 101 or 317w)
  • FRE xxx any French course
  • HGH xxx any Holocaust, Human Rights & Genocide course
  • HTY xxx any History course
  • HUM xxx any Humanities course
  • MUH xxx any Music History course
  • PHI xxx any Philosophy course (except PHI 135 or 335)
  • SPA xxx any Spanish course
  • WGS xxx any Women and Gender Studies course

The UMA graduate will understand the modes of expression within one or more areas of art (including, but not limited to visual arts, architecture, music, dance, theater, and cinematography).

Indicators

The UMA graduate will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the compositional elements within a work of art.
  2. Identify and describe important works of art within a given genre.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of cultural influences on artworks
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which art influences society.
  5. Provide a cogent interpretation for a chosen work of art.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of the vocabulary used in one of the disciplines within the arts.

UMA courses that meet the Fine Arts outcome:

  • ART 1xx any 100-level Art course
  • DRA xxx any Drama course
  • ENG 351 Creative Writing I
  • ENG 452 Creative Writing II
  • MUH 1xx any 100-level Music History course
  • MUS 1xx any 100-level Music course

The UMA graduate will be able to identify, discuss, analyze and evaluate issues pertaining to diversity.

Indicators

The UMA graduate will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of diversities within and among cultures, religions, races, ethnicities, genders, sexual preferences, abilities, ages and/or socioeconomic groups.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the scope and limitations of one’s own cultural perspective.
  3. Identify issues and problems that people from minority cultures have negotiating the dominant culture.
  4. Engage in critical inquiry into the problems, challenges and possibilities inherent in a diverse society.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the vocabulary used in one or more of the interdisciplinary studies of diversity.

The UMA graduate will be able to use basic computer technology required to communicate in a technology-based society.

Indicators

The UMA graduate will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the function of computer hardware components required to input, store, and process data, including appropriate peripheral devices.
  2. Perform basic operating systems file maintenance commands.
  3. Use a word processor to create, edit, and save a short research paper.
  4. Manage and comprehend a spreadsheet to organize/summarize/visualize quantitative data.
  5. Build an electronic database to store and use information.
  6. Professionally present information using presentation software.
  7. Use appropriate technology to communicate electronically

UMA courses that meet the Computer Literacy outcome:

  • CIS 100 Introduction to Computer Applications
  • CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Science

The UMA graduate will be able to find, evaluate, and use information from traditional and new technology sources.

Indicators

The UMA graduate will be able to:

  1. Determine the extent of information needed.
  2. Access the needed information effectively and efficiently.
  3. Evaluate information and its sources critically and constructively.
  4. Retain and integrate selected information into his or her knowledge base.
  5. Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose.
  6. Demonstrate the ethical use of information.

The UMA graduate will be able to think critically.

Indicators

The UMA graduate will be able to:

  1. Develop well-reasoned arguments.
  2. Demonstrate evaluative skills such as the ability to distinguish fact from opinions, identify central issues and problems, classify data, judge credibility, predict consequences, recognize assumptions and inconsistencies, detect bias, plan alternate strategies, and evaluate arguments and hypotheses.
  3. Demonstrate thinking skills such as flexibility, precision, accuracy and/or reflection.
  4. Identify and solve a variety of types of problems
  5. Demonstrate the use of both inductive and deductive reasoning
  6. Demonstrate creative thinking

The UMA graduate will be able to assess their own ethical values and the social context of problems, recognize ethical issues in a variety of settings, think about how different ethical perspectives might be applied to ethical dilemmas, and consider the ramifications of alternative actions.  (adapted from LEAP VALUE rubric: https://www.aacu.org/ethical-reasoning-value-rubric)

Indicators

The UMA graduate will be able to:

  1. Analyze and discuss in depth both core beliefs and the origins of the core beliefs.
  2. Identify and explain different ethical perspectives, concepts or theories.
  3. Recognize ethical issues when presented in a complex, multilayered (gray) contest AND recognize interrelationships between issues.
  4. Apply ethical perspectives/concepts to an ethical question, accurately, and consider the full implications of the application.
  5. State a position and state the objections to, assumptions and implications of and can reasonably defend against the objections to, assumptions and implications of different ethical perspectives/concepts.